Who also makes $1,000 per day CLEAN?!

#1
So I would like to hear from other truck drivers or owner operators that after fuel and all expenses average atleast $1,000 per day in clean net before tax? Leaving aside something big breaking on your truck or trailer, so for the majority of the time how many of you are making such numbers? So if I’m out on the road 10 days I will take home $10k. If 15 days = $15,000 and such. Because this whole time with the ELD mandate I have never written a comment or spoken out, trying to understand everyone’s point of view and where they all come from, but at the end of the day I think most people that are all for it just have nothing to lose in the first place. I would like to hear someone else driving trucks pulling in the same figures in the same amount of time. And to not have to live in a truck year round. Work when u want and sit home when you want as long as you want. It’s as good as it gets in trucking with how I’ve been working for years and how much been making, so, what am I missing with all of you pro eld truckers?
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
#4
Because it's your attitude that makes it out here.

I worked 4 years with multiple log books years ago. Bossman calls me up and wants me to leave town with a load. Mind you my logs are still not home for another 5 days. He finally said either take it or clean out the truck.

I worked local hauling concrete after that week.

I bought my truck in 2012 this k of those days of 900-1000 mile days and having to live that life again.

**** that.

If it pisses one off that you can't lie anymore and make those runs, then one has to question the work ethics and such. As well as whether or not one should even be driving.


I knew just from the original post it's going to turn into a ELD pissing match all over again. One of about 1,000 already on the forum.
 
#5
No that’s where you’ve got me confused with majority of the other eld discussions and forums. But I could definitely see where you’re coming from and sounds like it was a ****ty situation. But to be honest I’ve never been in such a spot, I guess I’m lucky because my family’s been in trucking for a long while and I grew up in a truck. So I don’t even have that side of trucking to compare my experience to those bad ridiculous company’s out there. Which if that’s the case I still think it’s up to everyone to pick and choose who you want to work for or not, nobody is forcing anyone to stick around for bad employers. But for us, it’s never about the miles. In a 8-10 day trip, we will have 2-3 days tops where it’s only getting miles in from the time you wake up till the time you go to sleep. Even running multiple logs at once? That’s something we never need to do, because we usually have more than enough time to push back the logs whenever needed. Because with us we spend most the time making schedules and appointments and loading cars and unloading. So that’s like 70% of the work and then the rest driving in between. So for years it’s been as easy as you could imagine, I go to bed around same time everyday, when I’m tired and when I want to sleep, some days sooner some later. And also wake up whenever I feel like or when I agreed for a drop off or pickup of a car with a customer for example, often times even if I setup for 7-8am and still want to sleep, I would go unload the car that takes 30min to do roughly, and jump back in bed. So we always do what’s best for our health and what we want to do, then as long as it works with our schedules and customers. Then logs come last, just taylor them to our days and work. So with all of that in mind yea ELD vs paper doesn’t help our case at all, and I don’t need to push myself to ridiculous limits nor threatened to be out of a job if u don’t become a zombie and keep rolling when you have no strength to do so. So sounds like it all comes down to the “bad employers”? Which someone mentioned just don’t work for them and they will weed themselves out.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
#6
Car hauling is a specialty market. You will not be in the same income as someone who just hauls general freight.

Even moving from reefer to step deck has been a huge change in income.

I won't say I make and clear $1000 every day. But the monthly average is way better than when I worked as an engineer.
 
#7
At the end of the day this won’t affect me or my operation much at all, just a little hiccup where I swapped my few units out for glider kits instead. So back to business as usual. I’m just trying to find out better why anyone would want ELD at all in the first place? Because we don’t need to run 800-900 mile days all day everyday to make good money, for us it’s the opposite, we wait a day or 2 think about best load plan and cherry pick the best of the best then go about our business getting it done on our terms. When I’m driving down the freeway and randomly see some restaurant I crave right away I pull in and eat like a human, I’m not rushed in anyway at all. If afterwards feel a bit tired I’ll take a nap for few hours, maybe for the whole evening and night. Sometimes will sleep 14-16 hours randomly just because I feel like it. But the beauty is I can still do the work in a timely manner, live like a human being. & actually make a killing paycheck. That is why eld doesn’t make sense for me personally. Can everyone say the same? If forced to run harder then u want to or can handle then ditch that company and go find what fits you. But shoving down the crappy situation you’re in down everyone else’s throat doesn’t make sense lol. Seems like that’s just people hating that they don’t have it as good and if they suffering they want everyone else to suffer as well.
 
#8
Yes I agree, so that just proves how the trucking industry is so complex and very different apart from what type of trailer you’re pulling. So expecting everyone to play by the same exact rules? I don’t see that possible at all with the work that we do, because it’s not about running hard and killing your self, it’s just as simple as making the schedules at the right time, most the time going to kill waiting on someone that can’t keep there appointment time, or some car not starting. Or reloading them extra times. And to do the job properly you won’t be 100% legal on the logs. If you do it while being 100% legal on logs then u won’t make anything near what I would make. Now keep in mind a decent tractor trailer setup for us runs $300-$400k all day long. So the stakes are much higher all around in this sector of trucking vs pulling a box.
 

Agent_Z

Well-Known Member
#9
Car hauling is a specialty market. You will not be in the same income as someone who just hauls general freight.

Even moving from reefer to step deck has been a huge change in income.

I won't say I make and clear $1000 every day. But the monthly average is way better than when I worked as an engineer.
What kind of engineer? Civil, mechanical?

My uncle is a train "engineer" for BNSF, and he makes between $100 & $115K a year. And the time away from home is not that different than driving a big truck.
 

Blood

Driveler Emeritus
Supporter
#10
So I would like to hear from other truck drivers or owner operators that after fuel and all expenses average atleast $1,000 per day in clean net before tax? Leaving aside something big breaking on your truck or trailer, so for the majority of the time how many of you are making such numbers? So if I’m out on the road 10 days I will take home $10k. If 15 days = $15,000 and such. Because this whole time with the ELD mandate I have never written a comment or spoken out, trying to understand everyone’s point of view and where they all come from, but at the end of the day I think most people that are all for it just have nothing to lose in the first place. I would like to hear someone else driving trucks pulling in the same figures in the same amount of time. And to not have to live in a truck year round. Work when u want and sit home when you want as long as you want. It’s as good as it gets in trucking with how I’ve been working for years and how much been making, so, what am I missing with all of you pro eld truckers?
What are your equipment costs?
A new parking lot T/T is approaching $400k, right?
That's a lot of capital.
No idea what M&R cost are but I imagine it's much more significant than a 'typical' operation.

Assuming a 5 year life cycle, that would amount to your biggest cost replacing the top 2 (fuel & wages) in a standard operation (without considering residual value).

Not an indictment, merely an observation.
Apples and oranges.

A new entrant stepping into your segment would need cash n credit of around half a million to get started.
Of course, that's starting with new equipment...
considerably less initial investment up front starting with used equipment but also higher M&R cost coupled with lower revenue due to reliability.

I'm glad it's woikin out for you.
:smile:
 
#11
Yeah I can’t tell you much about any other trucking industry. But the enclosed car hauling is what my whole family has been into for 18+ years. So that’s all I know. It’s definitely a hard market to get into equipment wise and to be successful at, because doesn’t take much to lose big, and you can’t send it to insurance always because as anyone knows couple claims and you can forget about having descent insurance or having it at all. Between me and my brothers we run around 30 trucks plus minus. Majority are hardside liftgates, with a good handful of some soft side 9 car carriers. And we did start from the bottom so we have tried and gone through pretty much all the equipment for the enclosed car transport market with oldest being 80’s trailers and currently most of equipment is 2010+ some we still have are like 1998-1999-2005 Kentucky car haulers. Which they’re built pretty tough and most definitely run much longer than 5 years. So it’s hard to say exact numbers as we’ve had a big variety of different trucks and trailers to figure out what works best for us. Just within last 3-4 years did we start getting complete new units where just 6 car trailer is $220k if u pay cash, so with a loan on it you’re looking to pay out $250k+ just for the trailers. The soft side truck-trailer combinations range usually from $250k+ for a 3-5 year used setup. New will take about a year for Cottrell to build and right around $400k. But toughest thing usually is to get financing for used equipment, and even harder for new sometimes. If you get over that hurdle it’s how to do well in the field right away to keep up with those payments, so that is why seems like most don’t get into car hauling and even as drivers 3 out of 5 drivers will quit after first or 2nd trip lol. Not because worked too hard but because it’s a very fragile job dealing with high end cars and high end pickup and drop off locations. Billions of things could go wrong all day long.
 

Blood

Driveler Emeritus
Supporter
#12
Yeah I can’t tell you much about any other trucking industry. But the enclosed car hauling is what my whole family has been into for 18+ years. So that’s all I know. It’s definitely a hard market to get into equipment wise and to be successful at, because doesn’t take much to lose big, and you can’t send it to insurance always because as anyone knows couple claims and you can forget about having descent insurance or having it at all. Between me and my brothers we run around 30 trucks plus minus. Majority are hardside liftgates, with a good handful of some soft side 9 car carriers. And we did start from the bottom so we have tried and gone through pretty much all the equipment for the enclosed car transport market with oldest being 80’s trailers and currently most of equipment is 2010+ some we still have are like 1998-1999-2005 Kentucky car haulers. Which they’re built pretty tough and most definitely run much longer than 5 years. So it’s hard to say exact numbers as we’ve had a big variety of different trucks and trailers to figure out what works best for us. Just within last 3-4 years did we start getting complete new units where just 6 car trailer is $220k if u pay cash, so with a loan on it you’re looking to pay out $250k+ just for the trailers. The soft side truck-trailer combinations range usually from $250k+ for a 3-5 year used setup. New will take about a year for Cottrell to build and right around $400k. But toughest thing usually is to get financing for used equipment, and even harder for new sometimes. If you get over that hurdle it’s how to do well in the field right away to keep up with those payments, so that is why seems like most don’t get into car hauling and even as drivers 3 out of 5 drivers will quit after first or 2nd trip lol. Not because worked too hard but because it’s a very fragile job dealing with high end cars and high end pickup and drop off locations. Billions of things could go wrong all day long.
Well there you go.
There is decent money to be made while working up to the kind of capital it takes to do what you do.

I'm older and I've made more than my fair share of mistakes but I cringe at some of the 'typical' business models from right here on TFN.
Home mortgage.
Second mortgage.
Car payment.
Pickup payment.
Truck payment.
Trailer payment.

GOOD GRIEF!!
:stare2:

I've worked less than a month since November first due to family crises and health issues.
I can hold out another 6 months if I have to...
but I ain't livin' large up in here.

I would MUCH rather knock around in my 1996 Suburban than sign a 6 month note on a vehicle...
let alone a damn 6 year mortgage on a pile of plastic n silicone that costs more than it's worth in PPT & insurance.

I have never lived in a house with more than 1 bathroom.
I have never had a truck note that costs more than I could clear in 1 week.

But I ain't frontin'...
A few decades back, after being on extended lay-off from my factory job, Sears sent a feeble old gent around to repo a TV set.

"I have to get a payment or I have to repo your television."

Sorry, boss.
I don't have money for anything but food & shelter right now.
There is your TV set.
(sumitch prolly weighed about 4 thousand pounds!)
I'm not stopping you.

Well...
(looking nervous)
if you just promise to make a payment by...

I can't promise anything...
except to do the best I can.
(He's looking at the massive 2-ton console tee-vee!!)
I can help you you load it if you want.

Well...
I'll just tell them you promised to do your best.

:biggrin-2:

Yeah,
it was embarrassing...
to a point.
but the biggest thing on my mind was...
DAMN!!
If my dad ever finds out that I financed a television he's going to **** a brick!!
:scared:

It made me remember a few years previous when I was on leave one time.
Dad said he had to go to the bank.
He asked if I wanted to come along and go for lunch so I said, "Sure."
He pulled 5 or 6 un-cashed paychecks out of the 'box' along with a few war bonds and paid it all on the house mortgage except for a hundred dollars or so.

'Lunch' was a gas-station hotdog.
:tongue:

At the time I thought he was the biggest skinflint in the history of the world!!
:redface:
But he paid off a 20 year mortgage in under 5 years.

The lesson wasn't lost on me...
merely delayed until I got a VERY small taste of what my parents faced coming up during the great depression.

DRIVEL ALERT!!
Yeah, I know...
too late.
:wink:

:thefinger:
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#13
I honestly can’t begin to tell you how much I profit per day, on average, as the owner of a single truck and trailer.

Few can tell you this number, and I would only believe a very few of those that told me.

My truck and trailer has a cost, and a lifespan that has yet to be determined. There will be a purchase cost, and eventually a resale or trade in profit. There is a depreciation which saves me on taxes in the beginning, and there will be a resale in which I have to give some on those tax savings back in the end.

The cost to maintain the truck and trailer during it’s lifespan is another undetermined cost. I can guess closely, but every piece of equipment is different.

So, how much do I truly make per day? Couldn’t tell you because the numbers are far from finalized.

I can say, for me to try to truly profit $1,000/day over the life of this truck and trailer, or better yet, over the life of my time as a motor carrier, I would have to work much harder than I plan on working.

We are talking far above $365k in revenue per year once you add in equipment costs, fuel, supplies, various daily expenses............

Just guessing, but I imagine I would have to generate in the neighborhood of $500k in revenue to turn a $1,000/day profit. And this is with me collecting the money myself, not delegating it to a factoring company.

Given the amount of miles I intend to drive, 100k (less if possible), I would have to manage $5/mile for every mile the truck moves. I will tell you right now get I am not doing that well. If you are in an area of the industry that requires more equipment cost, safe to say you will need to average even higher.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
#14
Well there you go.
There is decent money to be made while working up to the kind of capital it takes to do what you do.

I'm older and I've made more than my fair share of mistakes but I cringe at some of the 'typical' business models from right here on TFN.
Home mortgage.
Second mortgage.
Car payment.
Pickup payment.
Truck payment.
Trailer payment.

GOOD GRIEF!!
:stare2:

I've worked less than a month since November first due to family crises and health issues.
I can hold out another 6 months if I have to...
but I ain't livin' large up in here.

I would MUCH rather knock around in my 1996 Suburban than sign a 6 month note on a vehicle...
let alone a damn 6 year mortgage on a pile of plastic n silicone that costs more than it's worth in PPT & insurance.

I have never lived in a house with more than 1 bathroom.
I have never had a truck note that costs more than I could clear in 1 week.

But I ain't frontin'...
A few decades back, after being on extended lay-off from my factory job, Sears sent a feeble old gent around to repo a TV set.

"I have to get a payment or I have to repo your television."

Sorry, boss.
I don't have money for anything but food & shelter right now.
There is your TV set.
(sumitch prolly weighed about 4 thousand pounds!)
I'm not stopping you.

Well...
(looking nervous)
if you just promise to make a payment by...

I can't promise anything...
except to do the best I can.
(He's looking at the massive 2-ton console tee-vee!!)
I can help you you load it if you want.

Well...
I'll just tell them you promised to do your best.

:biggrin-2:

Yeah,
it was embarrassing...
to a point.
but the biggest thing on my mind was...
DAMN!!
If my dad ever finds out that I financed a television he's going to **** a brick!!
:scared:

It made me remember a few years previous when I was on leave one time.
Dad said he had to go to the bank.
He asked if I wanted to come along and go for lunch so I said, "Sure."
He pulled 5 or 6 un-cashed paychecks out of the 'box' along with a few war bonds and paid it all on the house mortgage except for a hundred dollars or so.

'Lunch' was a gas-station hotdog.
:tongue:

At the time I thought he was the biggest skinflint in the history of the world!!
:redface:
But he paid off a 20 year mortgage in under 5 years.

The lesson wasn't lost on me...
merely delayed until I got a VERY small taste of what my parents faced coming up during the great depression.

DRIVEL ALERT!!
Yeah, I know...
too late.
:wink:

:thefinger:
Don't need the drivel alert. Your name is adequate.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
#15
I honestly can’t begin to tell you how much I profit per day, on average, as the owner of a single truck and trailer.

Few can tell you this number, and I would only believe a very few of those that told me.

My truck and trailer has a cost, and a lifespan that has yet to be determined. There will be a purchase cost, and eventually a resale or trade in profit. There is a depreciation which saves me on taxes in the beginning, and there will be a resale in which I have to give some on those tax savings back in the end.

The cost to maintain the truck and trailer during it’s lifespan is another undetermined cost. I can guess closely, but every piece of equipment is different.

So, how much do I truly make per day? Couldn’t tell you because the numbers are far from finalized.

I can say, for me to try to truly profit $1,000/day over the life of this truck and trailer, or better yet, over the life of my time as a motor carrier, I would have to work much harder than I plan on working.

We are talking far above $365k in revenue per year once you add in equipment costs, fuel, supplies, various daily expenses............

Just guessing, but I imagine I would have to generate in the neighborhood of $500k in revenue to turn a $1,000/day profit. And this is with me collecting the money myself, not delegating it to a factoring company.

Given the amount of miles I intend to drive, 100k (less if possible), I would have to manage $5/mile for every mile the truck moves. I will tell you right now get I am not doing that well. If you are in an area of the industry that requires more equipment cost, safe to say you will need to average even higher.
Wait I thought you were gonna crack a billion dollars by June.
 
#16
Mike that is a very good answer. & I like the way you think. You are 100% right with taking all of those factors into count when coming up with anything near the exact digits we would want to calculate. Sadly I’m not as into it as I wish I was. But for what we do know and can count up for the most part is what I try to find out to compare something with. In our business trucks range from making a yearly gross between $300k-$600k+. It’s all very different from the drivers to the dispatchers to the equipment and everything else. And me personally I’ve been able to either sell my equipment for more than I purchased it for, or after it’s done well for me. I haven’t had any piece of equipment for more than 3-4 years till this point, the units I have currently I’m sure I’ll keep for a long while. But the till this day I’m confident to say that I at the very least came out flat even with all the trucks and trailers I bought and sold. Because some made a bunch more money on after using for 2 years or so, and others lost a bit. So from that I could say I came out even without it having to cost me anything besides the maintenance and other repair costs. But last 3 months I worked I’ve been able to do between $4-$6 per mile gross with the cars I been pulling. Where things change is I take big breaks and time off as well. So I work hard and relax even harder 😬
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
#17
Well there you go.
There is decent money to be made while working up to the kind of capital it takes to do what you do.

I'm older and I've made more than my fair share of mistakes but I cringe at some of the 'typical' business models from right here on TFN.
Home mortgage.
Second mortgage.
Car payment.
Pickup payment.
Truck payment.
Trailer payment.

GOOD GRIEF!!
:stare2:

I've worked less than a month since November first due to family crises and health issues.
I can hold out another 6 months if I have to...
but I ain't livin' large up in here.

I would MUCH rather knock around in my 1996 Suburban than sign a 6 month note on a vehicle...
let alone a damn 6 year mortgage on a pile of plastic n silicone that costs more than it's worth in PPT & insurance.

I have never lived in a house with more than 1 bathroom.
I have never had a truck note that costs more than I could clear in 1 week.

But I ain't frontin'...
A few decades back, after being on extended lay-off from my factory job, Sears sent a feeble old gent around to repo a TV set.

"I have to get a payment or I have to repo your television."

Sorry, boss.
I don't have money for anything but food & shelter right now.
There is your TV set.
(sumitch prolly weighed about 4 thousand pounds!)
I'm not stopping you.

Well...
(looking nervous)
if you just promise to make a payment by...

I can't promise anything...
except to do the best I can.
(He's looking at the massive 2-ton console tee-vee!!)
I can help you you load it if you want.

Well...
I'll just tell them you promised to do your best.

:biggrin-2:

Yeah,
it was embarrassing...
to a point.
but the biggest thing on my mind was...
DAMN!!
If my dad ever finds out that I financed a television he's going to **** a brick!!
:scared:

It made me remember a few years previous when I was on leave one time.
Dad said he had to go to the bank.
He asked if I wanted to come along and go for lunch so I said, "Sure."
He pulled 5 or 6 un-cashed paychecks out of the 'box' along with a few war bonds and paid it all on the house mortgage except for a hundred dollars or so.

'Lunch' was a gas-station hotdog.
:tongue:

At the time I thought he was the biggest skinflint in the history of the world!!
:redface:
But he paid off a 20 year mortgage in under 5 years.

The lesson wasn't lost on me...
merely delayed until I got a VERY small taste of what my parents faced coming up during the great depression.

DRIVEL ALERT!!
Yeah, I know...
too late.
:wink:

:thefinger:
Finally actually read all that.

And yeah I'm wishing I had stuck with just my Navigator. No truck, car, etc.

Regretting the house to a certain extent.

I enjoy most of it, but I'm locked into this gig until it's paid off. If I lose the gig for whatever reason, stuff's gonna come crashing down...hard.

I can afford it all easily...as long as nothing happens.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
#18
What kind of engineer? Civil, mechanical?

My uncle is a train "engineer" for BNSF, and he makes between $100 & $115K a year. And the time away from home is not that different than driving a big truck.

that would have been a "nunya engineer".....
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
#19
Mike that is a very good answer. & I like the way you think. You are 100% right with taking all of those factors into count when coming up with anything near the exact digits we would want to calculate. Sadly I’m not as into it as I wish I was. But for what we do know and can count up for the most part is what I try to find out to compare something with. In our business trucks range from making a yearly gross between $300k-$600k+. It’s all very different from the drivers to the dispatchers to the equipment and everything else. And me personally I’ve been able to either sell my equipment for more than I purchased it for, or after it’s done well for me. I haven’t had any piece of equipment for more than 3-4 years till this point, the units I have currently I’m sure I’ll keep for a long while. But the till this day I’m confident to say that I at the very least came out flat even with all the trucks and trailers I bought and sold. Because some made a bunch more money on after using for 2 years or so, and others lost a bit. So from that I could say I came out even without it having to cost me anything besides the maintenance and other repair costs. But last 3 months I worked I’ve been able to do between $4-$6 per mile gross with the cars I been pulling. Where things change is I take big breaks and time off as well. So I work hard and relax even harder 😬
Pulling exotics?
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
#20
What kind of engineer? Civil, mechanical?

My uncle is a train "engineer" for BNSF, and he makes between $100 & $115K a year. And the time away from home is not that different than driving a big truck.
Electrical here - worked in electronic and software design. And yeah, I'd agree with mndriver mndriver (Dear Lord, please don't smite me down!) I'm doing better in trucking than I did in engineering.

Besides, the view out the office window changes.

:biggrin-2:
 
Top