Truck Repair Which Wiper Blade is best?

DubbleD

Color Commentator
I spent $17.00 per blade for a nice set of Bosch wiper blades. I had read about all the R & D Bosch performed to get it right.

Bosch used the crazy dude on Tornado Chasers to sell 'em.

I was disappointed.

2 months and a fairly good snowstorm proved to ME ... Bosch didn't test 'em in northern climates.

First chance I got... I bought Anco Winter blades for $7.00 each... finished the worst of the storm without having to pull over and knock the ice out from under the blades like I was forced to do with the Bosch blades a dozen times in 4 hours.

Anybody have a brand you feel performs to the demands of commercial vehicles?
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I clean my windshield well with my own homemade cleaner on a regular basis.

I then apply rain-x to the windshield.

The cheap anco wipers work fine.

The rain-x step is just a preference of mine. The physical cleaning of the windshields is the important part.

I like a clean clear windshield
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
I use Rainex Latitude. I tried the Bosch after a friend endorsed them and was similarly disappointed. They only lasted a month before I was p/o'ed enough to buy another set of the Rainex ones.

I have never had a set of wipers NOT get gummed up during a snow storm, but it takes a lot longer for these Rainex ones to get that way. They're easier to clean off, too. Most times, all I have to do is put the defroster on high, hot and turn the wipers on full. The windshield warms up enough to melt the ice off the edge and the fast swiping flings most of the crud off. They don't streak nearly as much as any of the others, either.

So...Rainex Latitude for me.
 

Southern Fried

Well-Known Member
I have yet to see good snow wipers sold in the US. Everything's designed for summer weather.
 

DubbleD

Color Commentator
I have yet to see good snow wipers sold in the US. Everything's designed for summer weather.
Anco makes and sells under the name, Winter Blade. The blade mechanism and arm are encased in a thin rubber boot.

Theses blades work much better than an exposed arm and connection point that will collect snow and ice.

I'm wanting to know if anybody has a better blade or a favorite blade for extreme conditions.
 

Duck

Quack
Supporter
I clean my windshield well with my own homemade cleaner on a regular basis.

I then apply rain-x to the windshield.

The cheap anco wipers work fine.

The rain-x step is just a preference of mine. The physical cleaning of the windshields is the important part.

I like a clean clear windshield
I refuse to drive any vehicle that has Rain-X on the windshield.

The reason is because when you're driving at night, in the rain, with oncoming headlights, you can't see a ****ing thing. It's like it's fogged up, except the fog is on the outside and the wipers just smear it around.

A few weeks ago they replaced the windshield on this truck because it was cracked all the way across. The installer who came out to the shop to install it, put Rain-X on it. When I drove it in the rain at night, two days later, I figured out quick that it had Rain-X on it. When I got back to the shop I spent about an hour scrubbing that crap off with lighter fluid & paper towels.
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
The idiot who applied the Rainex didn't buff the windshield good enough after applying it. I can put the stuff on and almost not need wipers at all, especially at night...with lights in my face.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
The idiot who applied the Rainex didn't buff the windshield good enough after applying it. I can put the stuff on and almost not need wipers at all, especially at night...with lights in my face.
yep, it has to be applied properly. No issues with visibility at night other than the visibility being greatly improved.
 

8978

** Commie Express **
Supporter
I've tried all the wiper blades and they all seem to wear out. I just buy the El Cheapo ones now and replace on a regular basis.

As far as RainX. I swear by it 100%. I usually never have to use my wipers at night when it's raining and most times don't even know it's raining.

I get up there and clean the windshield twice. Then with clean paper towels I apply RainX twice waiting for it to dry in between coats. After the second coat is dry I buff with a clean cloth.

Anyone do it another way?
 

8978

** Commie Express **
Supporter
Also, Rainx is a great detector. If you have a small cut, YOU WILL KNOW IT
 

Duck

Quack
Supporter
The idiot who applied the Rainex didn't buff the windshield good enough after applying it. I can put the stuff on and almost not need wipers at all, especially at night...with lights in my face.
yep, it has to be applied properly. No issues with visibility at night other than the visibility being greatly improved.
I've never put Rain-X on a windshield myself. Never even read the instructions on the bottle to see how it's applied. But I'd tend to think that a professional windshield installer would know how to put it on.

I guess not.
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
A trained monkey can install a windshield. It's not exactly rocket science.

Windshield people get paid piecemeal. They aren't going to necessarily take the time to attend the small details.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
I tell ya what is good, Is the washer fluid made by Rain-X. It costs a bit more but it works well. Crystal clear windows and it melts frost,Snow and ice. I recently bought a jug just to try it and now I will be buying more.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
I've never put Rain-X on a windshield myself. Never even read the instructions on the bottle to see how it's applied.
I did read the directions on the bottle when thinking about buying it. That's why I chose not to buy it. There has to be a better way of applying it. Work on it Rain-X.
 

ProDriver77

Well-Known Member
Another vote for Anco blades. We use them on all of our trucks and get at least 6 months - a year out of them.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
The best wiper blades are what ever ones you put on the passenger side. I find they always work the best, no matter the brand.
 

DubbleD

Color Commentator
I refuse to drive any vehicle that has Rain-X on the windshield.

The reason is because when you're driving at night, in the rain, with oncoming headlights, you can't see a ****ing thing. It's like it's fogged up, except the fog is on the outside and the wipers just smear it around.

A few weeks ago they replaced the windshield on this truck because it was cracked all the way across. The installer who came out to the shop to install it, put Rain-X on it. When I drove it in the rain at night, two days later, I figured out quick that it had Rain-X on it. When I got back to the shop I spent about an hour scrubbing that crap off with lighter fluid & paper towels.
I heard there is a chemical reaction between RainX windshield gunk and sodium chloride, the windshield will get milky. and POTUS did it.

A trained monkey can install a windshield. It's not exactly rocket science.

Windshield people get paid piecemeal. They aren't going to necessarily take the time to attend the small details.

You want me to like you a little?.... I trained my brother, he's going on 30 years of auto glass installation. There's a ton more to it than meets the eye, you gotta know every make model and style, every application process...

...and know how to vacuum glass appropriately or you'll stick it in the fibers of the upholstery and the next call you get will be from the insurance agent informing you of the lawsuit.
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
You want me to like you a little?.... I trained my brother, he's going on 30 years of auto glass installation. There's a ton more to it than meets the eye, you gotta know every make model and style, every application process...
The glass shop that did my pickup had about three youngsters in their early 20's doing the windshields. The little gal who did mine had been on the job for a week. She did a fine job without direct supervision.

...and know how to vacuum glass appropriately or you'll stick it in the fibers of the upholstery and the next call you get will be from the insurance agent informing you of the lawsuit.
There was no vacuuming involved with any windshield replacement I have had done, ever. Every windshield I have had replaced was removed in a single piece because of the non-shatter layer.
 

DubbleD

Color Commentator
The glass shop that did my pickup had about three youngsters in their early 20's doing the windshields. The little gal who did mine had been on the job for a week. She did a fine job without direct supervision.



There was no vacuuming involved with any windshield replacement I have had done, ever. Every windshield I have had replaced was removed in a single piece because of the non-shatter layer.

Both layers are annealed and will break/shatter. The inner layer is .030 vinyl that adheres both pieces into a sandwich.

If you had no glass fragments ... it weren't broke enough.

Also.. the TEMPERED glass in the rest of the vehicle will break into pieces about a quarter inch sq... and a vacuum is easier than pickin' it up by hand.
 
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