Where the heck is Phoenix? Pullers 20...

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
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Rented a core drill and put in a floor drain for the dehumidifier.

It seems to be keeping up with the pump ok, I should check it this morning
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
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I can’t find the thread where we was talking about oil/water separators

I’m trying a new Donaldson filter that’s supposed to have a water separating element in it.

But I have no idea when it’s “full” and needs to be changed :dunno:
 

r3gulator3

Friendly Neighborhood Former Technician
Supporter
Nope. Looks like a regular filter

Maybe I’ll call Donaldson this week
So no drain on it either?

If that’s the case then you have a secondary coalessor. Essentially you should have a water separator doing its job upstream from this. This is like a back up plan in case of failure.
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
So no drain on it either?

If that’s the case then you have a secondary coalessor. Essentially you should have a water separator doing its job upstream from this. This is like a back up plan in case of failure.
Interesting. I’ll have to google “hydraulic oil water separator” and see what pops up. Or go to a hydraulic hose shop and see what they have to offer
 

r3gulator3

Friendly Neighborhood Former Technician
Supporter
They make a Donaldson filter that same diameter with a drain **** on it. That’s a water separator, but instead of viewing how much water is in it you’re supposed to drain it daily.
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
They make a Donaldson filter that same diameter with a drain **** on it. That’s a water separator, but instead of viewing how much water is in it you’re supposed to drain it daily.
I’ve seen those on fuel filters before but not oil filters.

I’d have to redo the filter housing to hang the filter vertically instead of horizontally, too.

Or maybe run a hose and mount it in a different spot altogether. Having two filters wouldn’t hurt anything

Hhhhmmmmm :dunno:
 

r3gulator3

Friendly Neighborhood Former Technician
Supporter
I’ve seen those on fuel filters before but not oil filters.

I’d have to redo the filter housing to hang the filter vertically instead of horizontally, too.

Or maybe run a hose and mount it in a different spot altogether. Having two filters wouldn’t hurt anything

Hhhhmmmmm :dunno:
Oh wait, I misunderstood. I thought this was a fuel filter. Personally I have never seen a water coalessor for oil. However your oil is exposed to a lot less water than fuel so it makes sense there is no drain. This is more to protect your bottom end in the event of coolant coming into your oil. Which an engineer thinks you’ll be smart enough to shut it down when the low coolant light comes on.
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
Oh wait, I misunderstood. I thought this was a fuel filter. Personally I have never seen a water coalessor for oil. However your oil is exposed to a lot less water than fuel so it makes sense there is no drain. This is more to protect your bottom end in the event of coolant coming into your oil. Which an engineer thinks you’ll be smart enough to shut it down when the low coolant light comes on.
I don’t remember what thread it was in but I can’t find where I was talking about this before

Apparently they add a layer of dessicant into the oil filter to try to pull out some of the water that’s been emulsified into the oil.

This is on an old tractor I use around the shop. There was so much water in the gearboxes it froze up two winters ago. The hydraulic oil is milkier than it should be, too.

I’ve never seen oil freeze before :coocoo:
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
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View attachment 50920
I can’t find the thread where we was talking about oil/water separators

I’m trying a new Donaldson filter that’s supposed to have a water separating element in it.

But I have no idea when it’s “full” and needs to be changed :dunno:
Donaldson said change them on the regular service interval

Or keep an eye on the hydraulic oil restriction gauge

Well we don’t have such a gauge and the filter gets changed once every 5-6 years at this point :thefinger:

I don’t even know how you’d plumb a restriction gauge in....
 

Gdjjr

Well-Known Member
I don’t remember what thread it was in but I can’t find where I was talking about this before

Apparently they add a layer of dessicant into the oil filter to try to pull out some of the water that’s been emulsified into the oil.

This is on an old tractor I use around the shop. There was so much water in the gearboxes it froze up two winters ago. The hydraulic oil is milkier than it should be, too.

I’ve never seen oil freeze before :coocoo:
If the oil freezes it's too damn cold - LOL- that said, the first class I attended on DD's the instructor told a story about a 6v53 in Alaska on a piece of equipment- apparently the operator got off (for whatever reason) and forgot to shut it down. Well a bad storm came in and they evacuated- they came back days later and the unit was till running at idle- all the hoses had frozen and broke but there was no engine damage-

The milky you're seeing could very easily be condensation that gets mixed with the whatever lubricant you're using- if you take it easy it will eventually steam away- I saw that very thing happen on some DD fire pump engines in the North Sea - I just cranked them up and let then run at idle til the steaming stopped-
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
If the oil freezes it's too damn cold - LOL- that said, the first class I attended on DD's the instructor told a story about a 6v53 in Alaska on a piece of equipment- apparently the operator got off (for whatever reason) and forgot to shut it down. Well a bad storm came in and they evacuated- they came back days later and the unit was till running at idle- all the hoses had frozen and broke but there was no engine damage-

The milky you're seeing could very easily be condensation that gets mixed with the whatever lubricant you're using- if you take it easy it will eventually steam away- I saw that very thing happen on some DD fire pump engines in the North Sea - I just cranked them up and let then run at idle til the steaming stopped-
You could be right

I’ve been reading up on it a little bit, the first thing is I have no vent on the hydraulic tank. So even if I heat up the oil enough to have the water separate and steam off, it would just go the top of the reservoir, condense, and drip back down into the oil. So I think adding a breather or at least some type of vent is crucial. I think there has to be a way to have airflow

Second, from what I’ve read, once oil is saturated with water it is hard to separate the two. I read you can drain it and heat it on a stovetop to dry out the oil, but even just letting it sit for a month or two the water won’t settle out by itself.

Some of the old timers have some good tricks up their sleeves when it comes to this stuff
 

Gdjjr

Well-Known Member
You could be right

I’ve been reading up on it a little bit, the first thing is I have no vent on the hydraulic tank. So even if I heat up the oil enough to have the water separate and steam off, it would just go the top of the reservoir, condense, and drip back down into the oil. So I think adding a breather or at least some type of vent is crucial. I think there has to be a way to have airflow

Second, from what I’ve read, once oil is saturated with water it is hard to separate the two. I read you can drain it and heat it on a stovetop to dry out the oil, but even just letting it sit for a month or two the water won’t settle out by itself.

Some of the old timers have some good tricks up their sleeves when it comes to this stuff
If you're going to go to the trouble of draining it just replace it with fresh- the separation depends on variables too detailed to go into here, suffice it to say; yes you do need a vent so the condensation (steam) can be vented, but, at the same time it provides an easy entry for more water from the atmosphere- kind of a catch 22, but, everyday use will cure most of the worries- if you can't work it everyday be sure to close off the vent when you park it for an extended period.
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
If you're going to go to the trouble of draining it just replace it with fresh- the separation depends on variables too detailed to go into here, suffice it to say; yes you do need a vent so the condensation (steam) can be vented, but, at the same time it provides an easy entry for more water from the atmosphere- kind of a catch 22, but, everyday use will cure most of the worries- if you can't work it everyday be sure to close off the vent when you park it for an extended period.
I picked up a breather/vent this morning, a couple new hoses and a sight glass with a built in thermometer. I need to get a couple 3/4” pipe fittings to put the vent where I want it

I’m somewhat hesitant to drill a couple holes in the reservoir tank, but it’s empty now. I would think a magnet and a good wipe down will get rid of all the metal pieces.
 

Gdjjr

Well-Known Member
I picked up a breather/vent this morning, a couple new hoses and a sight glass with a built in thermometer. I need to get a couple 3/4” pipe fittings to put the vent where I want it

I’m somewhat hesitant to drill a couple holes in the reservoir tank, but it’s empty now. I would think a magnet and a good wipe down will get rid of all the metal pieces.
Why do you need a thermometer?
Don't put the breather too far away or you'll be defeating the purpose- probably best to put it lower than the hole you drill though so any left over condensation will fall to the vent and less will go back to the reservoir/tank.
 
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