Where may a truck driver temporarily store his weapon whenever visiting military installations?

Sam McCloud

Well-Known Member
A civilian CMV driver may have to occasionally or regularly drive his truck on or off a base. Are there rental storage places outside the gates of military installations where a semi can park? Do truck stops have rental lockers?

A driver's plan might be to stop at the nearest truck stop with a rental locker where he has to enter a base to make a pickup or delivery. I don't want to run afoul of the feds with a weapon.

Many drivers reading here may carry arms on a regular bases and have to know how to deal with military installations. If there is a place off base I can conveniently and securely stow my gun, I'd rather use that option. Some bases I understand will hold declared weapons for you at the gate but others may not.

A weapon can be a gun, taser, stun gun, pepper spray, brass knuckles, knife etc. that a military installation may not allow on base or even have a facility to check declared weapons intio.
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
A civilian CMV driver may have to occasionally or regularly drive his truck on or off a base. Are there rental storage places outside the gates of military installations where a semi can park? Do truck stops have rental lockers?

A driver's plan might be to stop at the nearest truck stop with a rental locker where he has to enter a base to make a pickup or delivery. I don't want to run afoul of the feds with a weapon.

Many drivers reading here may carry arms on a regular bases and have to know how to deal with military installations. If there is a place off base I can conveniently and securely stow my gun, I'd rather use that option. Some bases I understand will hold declared weapons for you at the gate but others may not.

A weapon can be a gun, taser, stun gun, pepper spray, brass knuckles, knife etc. that a military installation may not allow on base or even have a facility to check declared weapons intio.
Just put it where they can’t find it. Jesus wept use common sense
 

r3gulator3

Friendly Neighborhood Former Technician
Supporter
63B2H8 and there’s another identifier for BNCOC but I forget what it is. But all that means nothing when you type it with that 1 or 2 in bold.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
The significance of the "10" has to do with rank.

10- E1-E4
20- E5
30-E6
40- E7-E8
50 E9

H8 means r3gulator3 r3gulator3 was a recover operations trained.

If our OP had really been in active duty service, getting into a gate with a weapon would have been well within the guidelines of what's post SOP when he transferred in.

Most installations have post armories you are required to check then into. Otherwise, it goes into the unit arms rooms.

Rare will you find a place that lets you keep them in billeting.
 

r3gulator3

Friendly Neighborhood Former Technician
Supporter
The significance of the "10" has to do with rank.

10- E1-E4
20- E5
30-E6
40- E7-E8
50 E9

H8 means r3gulator3 r3gulator3 was a recover operations trained.

If our OP had really been in active duty service, getting into a gate with a weapon would have been well within the guidelines of what's post SOP when he transferred in.

Most installations have post armories you are required to check then into. Otherwise, it goes into the unit arms rooms.

Rare will you find a place that lets you keep them in billeting.
I bet you can keep em in billeting on Richard Butler’s compound...
 

Ranger_375

Well-Known Member
The significance of the "10" has to do with rank.

10- E1-E4
20- E5
30-E6
40- E7-E8
50 E9

H8 means r3gulator3 r3gulator3 was a recover operations trained.

If our OP had really been in active duty service, getting into a gate with a weapon would have been well within the guidelines of what's post SOP when he transferred in.

Most installations have post armories you are required to check then into. Otherwise, it goes into the unit arms rooms.

Rare will you find a place that lets you keep them in billeting.
Stationed there? Check into your company arms room, get CO paperwork, get provost marshal paperwork, get CO paperwork, done.

Married on post? CO and provost marshal, store at your home. Register reloading equipment as well, sign acknowledging guidelines of maximum powder allowances and safe storage requirements.

Easiest to find a friend off post to stow them at, as now you're not reliant on your unit armorer to come in on his day off to let you check out your weapon.
 

Joker11

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Most government offices provide a gun locker for exactly that purpose. I would ask the provost marshall what hos policy is on base.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
Most government offices provide a gun locker for exactly that purpose. I would ask the provost marshall what hos policy is on base.
Maybe if you're retired. Joe Blow truck driver shows up and says what do I do with my gun, they turn you around, and tell you its you're problem, not theirs. At least that's what I've been told at the Air Force and Naval installations I've delivered to in the last few years. Maybe the Army is different.
 

Joker11

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I go onto the Marine Corps base. Sometimes they do ‘t even care. Sometimes they do. Idk man, 100 people probably have 100 answers.
 
Top