Whatcha Reading?

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
Dreamland by Sam Quinones

It’s about the USA war on drugs. Where it started, how they fought it, and are continuing to fight it. It’s very good so far
 

tommyh

Well-Known Member
Friday I read The Ten Golden Nuggets by John C J Lefler
today I am halfway done with
Holding Putter by the same guy
 

Gdjjr

Well-Known Member
I'm trying to read "Texas" by James Michener- I say trying because the edition I have is 1429 pages-:oops:- it's not really entertaining or eye opening but it is informative- Michener was noted for his studying what he wrote about- this covers 400 years of Texas History beginning in the late 1600's with the Spaniard settlements- a lot of facts, a lot of made up stories to fit the facts because the real stories don't exist- which is what Michener did.

I read others in the mean time- right now I'm reading "The Devils Banker" by Christopher Reich- it's about money gathering and transfers for funding terrorists- it's informative and entertaining.

I've reread several Michael Connelly books- he's the author of "The Lincoln Lawyer"-

Also read an older Robert B Parker story- he's the author of the Spenser books- which is where the TV series "Spenser for Hire" starring Robert Urich came from.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
Shattered Sword by Johnathan Parshall and Anthony Tully

Listened to as an audio book actually. This is another look at the Battle of Midway incorporating recently translated sources from the Japanese Navy. The classical accounts of Midway always looked through the eyes of the victors, and assumed the Japanese operated their carriers in the same manner as the US Navy. This is a false assumption, and allows previous authors to make unwarranted conclusions about the tactics of the IJN. This work brings home the fact that despite Fletcher beating Nagumo to the draw, the battle was much closer to evenly matched and the blundering of the US Navy air groups nearly lost the day.

The IJN never prepared airstrikes on carrier flight decks: arming and refueling was always performed in the hangars, and airstrikes were only brought up to the flight deck in the minutes before launch. Our disjointed land and naval strikes, and the haphazard approach of the IJN to fleet a9ir defense tactics were the only things that prevented a disaster, since Nagumo always had an anti-carrier strike ready to go from first light. Further, the valiant "last stand" of Torpedo Squadron 8 didn't play out in isolation as commonly portrayed. The Jap carriers were maneuvering to avoid Torpedo 8's attack while the dive bombers were starting their dives as reconstruction of the battle timeline shows from the IJN logs. The conjunction of Torpedo 8's attack with the dive bombers placed Kaga and Akagi precisely on courses to ensure the dive bomber's best chance of putting bombs on target.
 
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dave350

Well-Known Member
I'm trying to read "Texas" by James Michener- I say trying because the edition I have is 1429 pages-:oops:- it's not really entertaining or eye opening but it is informative- Michener was noted for his studying what he wrote about- this covers 400 years of Texas History beginning in the late 1600's with the Spaniard settlements- a lot of facts, a lot of made up stories to fit the facts because the real stories don't exist- which is what Michener did.

I read others in the mean time- right now I'm reading "The Devils Banker" by Christopher Reich- it's about money gathering and transfers for funding terrorists- it's informative and entertaining.

I've reread several Michael Connelly books- he's the author of "The Lincoln Lawyer"-

Also read an older Robert B Parker story- he's the author of the Spenser books- which is where the TV series "Spenser for Hire" starring Robert Urich came from.
I read Connelly. I like both the LL series and the Harry Bosch series. They made a tv series out of the Bosch novels. It’s on Amazon Prime. I like that also.
I limit myself on fiction. James Lee Burke, Connelly, John Sanford, and I just started reading Lee Child’s Jack Reacher.
Most times I’m reading non fiction.
 

Gdjjr

Well-Known Member
I read Connelly. I like both the LL series and the Harry Bosch series. They made a tv series out of the Bosch novels. It’s on Amazon Prime. I like that also.
I limit myself on fiction. James Lee Burke, Connelly, John Sanford, and I just started reading Lee Child’s Jack Reacher.
Most times I’m reading non fiction.
Mirrors my reading- there are many fiction writers though who write really plausible and entertaining books- like the one I talked about "The Devil's Banker"- I watched all the Bosch series shows- waiting on the new season.
 

BirchBarlow

I love KW 680s
Whatcha reading now? Or list your favorite authors, series, genre etc.....
Im working on Secrets Of The Gods by Grahmn Hancock..

Its a 600 some page book so Ive been working on it for quite awhile..

Since May 2014 according to the receipt I still use as a bookmark
 

r3gulator3

Friendly Neighborhood Former Technician
Supporter
Brandon Sanderson- stormlight series. I read “way of Kings” and “Words of Radiance” am now working on “Oathbringer”
 

Fageol

Old acid hauler but not too caustic
The Methods of Ethics
Henry Sidgwick

First published in 1874. A remarkably lucid review of utilitarian ethics although Sidgwick leaves unsaid (as far as I have read) any notion of how to protect minorities (à la the Bill of Rights). John Rawls wrote an introduction to this reprinted (7th) edition.
 
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