Whatcha Reading?

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
The Indian War of 1864 by Capt. Eugene Ware.

As a sergeant of Iowa volunteers, Capt Ware returned to Iowa after Pea Ridge, and became the 2nd Lt of G Company, 4th Iowa Volunteer Calvary. This is his memoir of life on the frontier in 1863 and 1864. The place names will be very familiar to any of us who have run I76 into eastern Colorado, and I80 in Iowa and Nebraska.
 

tommyh

Well-Known Member
Herodotus: The second book of the Histories, called Euterpe (English translation(Herodotus 2. book online)


this guy went to Egypt and asked around the people and they told him about the "machines" that was made and used to build the Great Pyramids.Made of timbers and ropes,they could pickup a 100,000 pound load each.They knew because it was passed down generation by generation..the year he was there was around 425 BC.I got to him by watching a youtube video and reading about Ron Wyatt from Tennessee who discovered Noahs Ark and he had other discoveries.

Ron made one of these "machines" himself and it worked!

stuff like this interests me so much I can`t stop reading
 

(((ME)))

Well-Known Member
If you stumble across “Margin of Safety” by Seth Klarman that book is going for $700 to $1000 on Internet. I managed to find it for free in a pdf format.

That’s a cool project you got going. 👍
Have added two more books to my collection......reference books.....world book dictionary......they hold a vault of information.
 

dave350

Well-Known Member
Here lately I’ve read a couple books that I’ve been waiting to buy because the library didn’t carry them.

“Am I Being Too Subtle?”
Sam Zell

And “”The Dhandho Investor”
Mohnish Pabrai.

I also got a business valuation textbook to work through a little at a time.

Mohnish is following in Warren Buffets path. Sam Zell is unique dude and a value investor as well. What amazes me about a good value investor is the patience and commitment to their beliefs that they have to exercise.

James Lee Burke has a new book out. I might read that next.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
As Herman Wouk wrote in War and Remembrance, “The vision of Sprague’s three destroyers—the Johnston, the Hoel, and the Heermann— charging out of the smoke and the rain straight toward the main batteries of Kurita’s battleships and cruisers, can endure as a picture of the way Americans fight when they don’t have superiority. Our schoolchildren should know about that incident, and our enemies should ponder it.”

The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors by James D Hornfischer

This is the story of the sailors and airmen of Taffy3, a group of auxiliary ships whose mission was to support the landings on Leyte in the Philippines in October 1944. It was the last big sortie of the Imperial Japanese Navy to give battle to the US Navy. The old battleships sunk at Pearl Harbor and refloated, engaged a Japanese battle line in the last fight between battleships. Halsey, lured north, went after the last Japanese aircraft carriers leaving 3 groups of escort carriers, destroyers and destroyer escorts to face down the largest fleet of Japanese battleships and heavy cruisers that ever sailed together.

Helluva story...
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
Here lately I’ve read a couple books that I’ve been waiting to buy because the library didn’t carry them.

And “”The Dhandho Investor”
Mohnish Pabrai.

Mohnish is following in Warren Buffets path. Sam Zell is unique dude and a value investor as well. What amazes me about a good value investor is the patience and commitment to their beliefs that they have to exercise
That one sounds interesting! Post the Cliff notes on that one, if you will.
 

dave350

Well-Known Member
That one sounds interesting! Post the Cliff notes on that one, if you will.
Ok. But I’ll keep it brief because if I go to far I’ll geek out and you’ll want to walk away. And then I’ll follow you and keep on geeking.

As with all good value investors, his message is also to make your money going in. Give yourself a big fat margin of safety in case you were off in your valuation. Patience. Read. Read. Read.
His overall theme......Heads I win, tails I don’t lose much. ;)

I’m stopping right there. I feel the geek expanding to burst level. :D

The Sam Zell book was good too. He sees things that others don’t see or don’t look for. He looks for large separations in the supply/ demand curve and buys aggressively and waits for the market to correct. Some of these guys are fascinating to me in how they look at the world.

And then I have to mention Buffett. He’s like..... an investing god. You can search “Buffett’s letters to shareholders and get a good idea of his approach to investing.

Ok. Now I’m done.

And then there’s the origin of all the above except Zell maybe and that’s Benjamin Graham........

:p
 

Gdjjr

Well-Known Member
I am reading and studing everything I can read on something called japanese joinery.They take wood craftmanship to the extreme level.Amazing what those little carpenters can do with a handful of tools and no nails,glue,screws or anything but wood
Most orientals I've had experience with are quite crafty- in more ways than one. ;)
 

Gdjjr

Well-Known Member
I recently read- Crazy Horse and Custer- the parallel lives of two American Warriors- by Stephen E. Ambrose.

I'm currently re-reading The Testimony by Scott Turow-

I have nearly 200 books by several good authors- I've read Lonesome Dove so many times I can't remember which led me to read other Larry McMurtry books- \\I also recently read


I enjoy History in story form- political intrigue- legal thrillers- and I also like Dog story books- Max (x miltary dog with PTSD) is a great story which is said to have been made into a movie- interestingly enough I really like Nicholas Sparks (chick flick stories but well written)- hell, I read cereal box labels- LOL

My keepers (partial list)

Empire of the Summer Moon- Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches the most powerful Indian Tribe in American History, by, S.C. Gwynne

In The Spirit of Crazy Horse- the story of Leonard Peltier, by Peter Matthiesen

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, by, Dee Brown

A Civil Action by, Jonathan Harr- the true story of an epic court room showdown of two of the nations largest corporations-

American Legend, by Buddy Levy- The Real-Life Adventures of David Crockett-

I also have on a memory stick, "I" will survive- by me
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
I recently read- Crazy Horse and Custer- the parallel lives of two American Warriors- by Stephen E. Ambrose.

I'm currently re-reading The Testimony by Scott Turow-

I have nearly 200 books by several good authors- I've read Lonesome Dove so many times I can't remember which led me to read other Larry McMurtry books- \\I also recently read


I enjoy History in story form- political intrigue- legal thrillers- and I also like Dog story books- Max (x miltary dog with PTSD) is a great story which is said to have been made into a movie- interestingly enough I really like Nicholas Sparks (chick flick stories but well written)- hell, I read cereal box labels- LOL

My keepers (partial list)

Empire of the Summer Moon- Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches the most powerful Indian Tribe in American History, by, S.C. Gwynne

In The Spirit of Crazy Horse- the story of Leonard Peltier, by Peter Matthiesen

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, by, Dee Brown

A Civil Action by, Jonathan Harr- the true story of an epic court room showdown of two of the nations largest corporations-

American Legend, by Buddy Levy- The Real-Life Adventures of David Crockett-

I also have on a memory stick, "I" will survive- by me
If you're interested in Custer, this is one you want to read:

Death at the Little Bighorn by Phillip Thomas Tucker

It includes surviving testimonial accounts of the Lakota and Cheyenne combatants, and how their actions affected the course of combat - especially at the lower ford. These accounts are especially important in understanding the battle, and differ dramatically from the classic accounts of the battle, written from observations made by Army officers who walked the field after the battle, survivors who wished nothing more than to distance themselves from culpability and Libby Custer whose intent was to gild her late husband's name and reputation.

Another good book that impinges on "Custer's Last Stand" is:

Wooden Leg: A Warrior Who Fought Custer
by Wooden Leg and Thomas Baile

Wooden Leg participated in the battle as a young man, and this is the story of his life.
 
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Gdjjr

Well-Known Member
If you're interested in Custer, this is one you want to read:

Death at the Little Bighorn by Phillip Thomas Tucker

It includes surviving testimonial accounts of the Lakota and Cheyenne combatants, and how their actions affected the course of combat - especially at the lower ford. These accounts are especially important in understanding the battle, and differ dramatically from the classic accounts of the battle, written from observations made by Army officers who walked the field after the battle, survivors who wished nothing more than to distance themselves from culpability and Libby Custer whose intent was to gild her late husband's name and reputation.
I'll check it out. Thanks! The book by Ambrose, Crazy Horse and Custer (if you read between the lines) shows her ambitions- that's on top of the parallels of their lives- he did some good research.
 

Gdjjr

Well-Known Member
I did a quick read of the comments- I found this intersting since it's what I would say, sorta, about the Ambrose book.

Phillip Thomas Tucker's Death at the Little Bighorn: A New Look at Custer...provides a new and different picture regarding the battle of Little Bighorn. This book is rich in details that examine perspectives not usually consulted.
Tucker took the time to sift through official military records as well as consulted Native American legacy, and histories passed down by word of mouth. He compares information from the sources of multiple tribes and combined all of it together in an organized text that's well-cited and includes a helpful index and interesting photo insert.
I liked that this extensive source not only examined the often misconstrued battle, but also took an in-depth look at the surrounding details and events that led up to it. Tucker considered many of the involved factors of the conflict between the US and Native Americans including the loss of the buffalo and controversy over the Black Hills area of land among other things.
This book is chock full of interesting information for historians who enjoy delving into the life of Custer, examining the way of life of the Native Americans, or simply enjoy reading about life in America in the mid 1850s. It does require some devoted reading time to best absorb all of the information, but it's well worth the investment.

 

tommyh

Well-Known Member
If you're interested in Custer, this is one you want to read:

Death at the Little Bighorn by Phillip Thomas Tucker

It includes surviving testimonial accounts of the Lakota and Cheyenne combatants, and how their actions affected the course of combat - especially at the lower ford. These accounts are especially important in understanding the battle, and differ dramatically from the classic accounts of the battle, written from observations made by Army officers who walked the field after the battle, survivors who wished nothing more than to distance themselves from culpability and Libby Custer whose intent was to gild her late husband's name and reputation.

Another good book that impinges on "Custer's Last Stand" is:

Wooden Leg: A Warrior Who Fought Custer
by Wooden Leg and Thomas Baile

Wooden Leg participated in the battle as a young man, and this is the story of his life.
I found a online copy of the wooden leg book.
Im reading and should be done later today.Its a Good read
this online copy don`t have pics,only text

 
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