Fuel Economy Turbo3000D - A PATENTED ADVANCED FUEL DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY PRODUCT

TheLittleGuy

The Truckster
I think that thing was called a "tornado" or something. It supposedly would make more power or fuel efficiency by causing the air in the carb/throttle body spin in a vortex.

But when I saw that they were also trying to say that it will work if mounted to the air cleaner intake, (pre-filter) I was wondering why they don't get sued for such blatant false advertising.
It even works if you hang it from your rearview mirror! At least then, you can show it off to everybody!
 

Racer X 69

Member
Parasitic drag refers to wind resistance. Thick oil would cause mechanical friction in the form of blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah...
Parasitic drag is much more than just wind resistance.

Ever hear of a windage tray? A windage tray is a device placed inside of the crank case of a racing engine that is fitted closely to the rotating crankshaft assembly. The device "scrapes" (it doesn't actually touch the crank assembly) the oil off of the crank as the oil is coming out from the connecting rod and main bearings. This removes the oil much more quickly than just allowing it to be flung off as the crank rotates, reducing parasitic drag, and providing a net gain in horsepower at the output end of the engine.

More and more engines are getting components that once were considered race only items. Roller rockers, with roller tips. Roller cam followers. Composite components that are replacing metal parts. All to reduce parasitic drag.

Engine builders also polish everything inside of the engine. This helps to prevent the possibility of fractures due to stress risers, and also promotes the quick return of the oil to the sump, again providing a net gain in power and reducing parasitic drag.

Porting and polishing, and matching the joints in the intake and exhaust stream also help reduce losses due to drag by reducing parasitic drag of the airflow into, and out of, the engine.

Using lower viscosity gear lubricants in the transmission and differential, also helps to reduce frictional losses, e.g. parasitic drag.

And using tires designed for lower rolling resistance further reduces parasitic drag.

Now some of what I mention here is purely race stuff, but more and more manufacturers are incorporating these "tricks" into today's cars and trucks in an effort to gain every last bit of benefit that contributes toward better fuel economy and lower emissions.
 

limoman

New Member
it is unfortunate that products like the TURBO 3000 undermine people's trust in new technologies. some actually do work. A closed mind will come to the conclusion it wants. there are ways to increase fuel economy and NO, OEMs have little interest in making mpg improvements, R&D costs money and there's a constant need to produce a better truck each succeeding year to stimulate sales. don't expect a miracle any time soon. government has no interest in reduced consumption as most road improvements are paid for by fuel taxes > reduce consumption >> reduce the tax revenue. if you like your highways, you would be concerned about this. a simple device which reduces emissions and reduces mpg with a 15 year track record is readily available.
 

8978

** Commie Express **
Supporter
In my day. If you put tin foil over your front plate radar would just bounce off and police couldn't catch you
 
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