Fuel Economy Turbo3000D - A PATENTED ADVANCED FUEL DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY PRODUCT

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
When fuel enters the combustion chambers, the fuel injector creates a fine and wide mist of the fuel. This is known as atomization of the fuel. The finer the fuel is atomized, and the wider the mixing of the oxygen and fuel in the combustion chamber. The larger the use of the entire piston surface area, the more efficient and powerful the combustion event.


This results in improved fuel economy and improved horsepower development, with very little smoke or soot. In addition, carbon development in the combustion chamber is minimized and oil contamination is greatly reduced. When the fuel injector on a diesel engine is unable to atomize fuel efficiently due to temperature, viscosity, or too rapid of a load change, the injector will stream the fuel rather than atomizing it. This condition creates an extremely inefficient burn, resulting in poor fuel economy, less horsepower, and black smoke with overall poor engine performance.


The TURBO 3000D works to improve atomization by creating a change in the travel pattern of the fuel, prior to the fuel injector. TURBO 3000D provides the fuel injector with an efficient delivery of fuel reducing all of the effects which create streaming at the fuel injector. Fuel rail pressure equalization is also achieved by this change in fuel travel action, leading to a smoother idle, and a quieter running engine.


The TURBO 3000D improves combustion efficiency in a totally natural way, without the use of magnets, electrical fields, precious metals, or chemical additives that might release harmful elements of their own into the air we breathe. The TURBO 3000D is precision machined in the USA, from high-grade brass, stainless steel and aluminum. It has no moving parts, is maintenance-free, installs as easily as an in-line fuel filter, and should last indefinitely.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Those are the claims from the website. Now we are looking for "real" users of this product and what kind of results you are seeing.
 

TheLittleGuy

The Truckster
I bought into that marketing scheme. Got mine from the Iowa 80 Truck Stop in Walcott, IA.

In short, it doesn't work!

What I discovered, it's a psychological trick. What it initially caused me to do, was to drive slower. Therein, I thought it was actually working. When someone convinced me to go cross-country, following them, hammer down? My fuel economy was EXACTLY the same as it had been prior to installing it.

Why it doesn't work? Simple. It gets installed BEFORE the lift pump (ie; before the fuel gets pressurized). 2nd, the fuel still has to be directed to multiple fuel injectors. This upsets any pre-lift pump flow modifiers.

At best, the only logical conclusions I can come to that would have any inkling of it working? Is that it's made of metal and attached to the engine block. So it heats up with the engine block and MAY help warm the fuel up a little bit earlier, which could help atomization.

Otherwise, it's just a long, heavy metal tube with nothing more than two bars running across the middle of it's bore and perpendicular to each other. If you look down it's bore, you see what looks like gun-sight crosshairs.But the intersecting bars are at different lengths within the bore and don't touch each other.

Save your money by not buying this product.
 

Duck

Trump
Supporter
Good review.

But I had a much simpler way of determining that it doesn't work, without even trying it.

I looked at the ad.

It says it saves fuel. Yet it's available on the open market. If it really did what it was claimed to do, one of two things would happen.


  • Truck manufacturers who are under pressure by their customers to make more fuel efficient trucks, would install them on the trucks at the factory
  • The oil companies would snatch up the patent so they can keep it off the market.
 

Racer X 69

Member
I have to agree with T TheLittleGuy and @Duck on this.

As with all these gimcracks and geegaws, when a person installs something they will change their driving habits. They will see an improvement because they want to, not because they actually do. It is the same with all those snake oils on the market that claim to give better fuel economy and more power.

If the manufacturers, who spend billions in research and development, saw any benefit in this stuff, it would either be an option from the factory or be incorporated as standard equipment.

The same goes for the additives.

The fuel and lubricant manufacturers also spend major amounts on research and development. If the aftermarket stuff really performed as claimed, it would be part of the additive package before it was sent out for public use.
 

Duck

Trump
Supporter
My grandpa always put "Slick 50" in his cars, every 50,000 miles, starting at 5,000 after break-in.

He sold his 1985 Buick Century to my parents sometime in the 90's. I was only about 10 years old when I became my parents' full time mechanic, (for things within my capabilities) and I put Slick 50 in again when it hit 105,000 and couldn't wait to change the oil on their cars when they were due.

When I was a teenager, the 3.8L V6 engine in that Buick threw a rod at 178,000 miles. It might have had something to do with the fact I was doing "reverse donuts" in a gravel parking lot at the time, but I've heard that 170-180k is about average for those engines. So I don't know if the Slick 50 did anything to prolong the life of that motor or what.
 

TheLittleGuy

The Truckster
Good review.

But I had a much simpler way of determining that it doesn't work, without even trying it.

I looked at the ad.

It says it saves fuel. Yet it's available on the open market. If it really did what it was claimed to do, one of two things would happen.

  • Truck manufacturers who are under pressure by their customers to make more fuel efficient trucks, would install them on the trucks at the factory
  • The oil companies would snatch up the patent so they can keep it off the market.
yeah well, I was a newbie lease op with money burning a hole in my pocket when I bought it! I shoulda bought that Connex instead! lol
 

TheLittleGuy

The Truckster
I have to agree with @TheLittleGuy and @Rubber Duck on this.

As with all these gimcracks and geegaws, when a person installs something they will change their driving habits. They will see an improvement because they want to, not because they actually do. It is the same with all those snake oils on the market that claim to give better fuel economy and more power.

If the manufacturers, who spend billions in research and development, saw any benefit in this stuff, it would either be an option from the factory or be incorporated as standard equipment.

The same goes for the additives.

The fuel and lubricant manufacturers also spend major amounts on research and development. If the aftermarket stuff really performed as claimed, it would be part of the additive package before it was sent out for public use.
Maybe I'm misinformed. But as I understood it. Unlike the gasoline market, fuel stations weren't allowed to add their own detergent/additives to diesel fuel.

Synthetic oil is in all my gearboxes, from the factory. And I'm hearing good things about it as an engine oil, though I use Delvac and my shop would prefer if I used Rotella in my ISX. Rotella came in it from the factory, but the engine seems to run better with Delvac.

And I'll swear by Lucas in the oil. Not that it'll make the engine last longer because I don't know that. But it sure quieted my top end down and cold starts are a lot smoother and willing. And if i use 2 gallons at oil change, it seems to reduce oil consumption.

The only fuel treatments that I know work, are Howe's Meaner Power Cleaner, and Diesel 911. I haven't tried the Stanadyne or Amsoil.

But I'll admit, that I'm addicted to using fuel treatments. I even add 1 gallon of gasoline to every 100 gallons of diesel. It definitely gives it an added umph in power (I'm not the only one whose noticed that). And it might add a minuscule amount fuel economy.

And when the temps are getting down into the teen or lower, I'm using Power Service in the white bottle and my truck is stocked with the Diesel 911, in the red bottle. Sometimes, I even goto Walmart and get the big bottles of rubbing alcohol with the red label on them.
I made the mistake once of shutting off my truck at the TA in NH on a particularly cold winter night( I have an apu on-board). In the morning, I fired up the truck and got about 10 miles down the road before the engine started sputtering and quickly died. I pulled over and fired up the apu, which only ran a couple of minutes. I figured the fuel had gelled or waxed or whatever. Luckily, I had one bottle of that rubbing alcohol. It got things running. Ever since then, I keep witner fuel treatment on-hand. I figure that $10-$30 woth of insurance is sure cheaper than a $300+ tow bill. Not to mention the down time and freezing your butt off!
 

Duck

Trump
Supporter
The only thing I've put Lucas oil in (so far) is my 1946 Ford 2N tractor. It was built right after WW2 but amazingly it still runs strong. But it smokes really bad. I use a mixture of Lucas and Rotella 20W-50 in it. It just about stopped the smoking and it hasn't used any oil since I put it in.

I might put some in my Ford Ranger pickup. It's got a 2.9L V6 with the infamous heads with lifters that clatter really loud when you first start it, until oil gets pumped up there. There's nothing wrong with it. Those 2.9L engines have an excellent reputation for longevity even though they have that lifter noise, and being amazing little torque machines for their size. But I'm tired of people telling me my engine is about to blow up every time I start it up cold.

I've never heard about putting gasoline in the diesel fuel though. I don't know if I'd try it with one of the newer trucks that have to run on ULSD and have those stupid DPF's and SCR systems on them.

PowerService in the white jug is good stuff. I gelled up twice in 2007 with Howe's in the fuel. It was right when they mandated ULSD and even though it said "ULSD formula" on the jugs, I think it was blatant false advertising. They might have improved their product since then but I still won't use it.
 

Racer X 69

Member
So I don't know if the Slick 50 did anything to prolong the life of that motor or what.
Not a thing. Except that maybe spending the money on it every 50,000 miles kept him from being able to buy more gas to be able to drive it more.
 

Racer X 69

Member
Maybe I'm misinformed. But as I understood it. Unlike the gasoline market, fuel stations weren't allowed to add their own detergent/additives to diesel fuel.
But the fuel manufacturer blends the fuel at the refinery.

Synthetic oil is in all my gearboxes, from the factory. And I'm hearing good things about it as an engine oil, though I use Delvac and my shop would prefer if I used Rotella in my ISX. Rotella came in it from the factory, but the engine seems to run better with Delvac.
Gear lube is not oil. Oil is carbon based, gear lube is graphite based. Gear lube will not burn like motor oils will because of that.

Nothing wrong with synthetic lubricants though, in fact most oils and gear lubes now are at least partially synthetic.

And I'll swear by Lucas in the oil. Not that it'll make the engine last longer because I don't know that. But it sure quieted my top end down and cold starts are a lot smoother and willing. And if i use 2 gallons at oil change, it seems to reduce oil consumption.
Lucas what? Lucas markets many products, including motor oils.

The only fuel treatments that I know work, are Howe's Meaner Power Cleaner, and Diesel 911. I haven't tried the Stanadyne or Amsoil.
A good quality diesel fuel anti-gel treatment is crucial in winter months. Some fuel stations in the Northern areas actually sell a blended fuel at the pump with the anti-gel already in it.

But I'll admit, that I'm addicted to using fuel treatments. I even add 1 gallon of gasoline to every 100 gallons of diesel. It definitely gives it an added umph in power (I'm not the only one whose noticed that). And it might add a minuscule amount fuel economy.
I'm not so sure that adding gasoline in any amount is a good idea in diesel engines. With the ultra low sulfur fuel the lubricity of the fuel is already compromised. Adding gasoline would only serve to further reduce the lubricity of the fuel. This can lead to premature fuel system component failure.

But it is your truck, so if you believe it is a good thing, go for it.

Sometimes, I even goto Walmart and get the big bottles of rubbing alcohol with the red label on them.
Again, I don't think that adding stuff to the fuel is a great idea, other than anti-gel.
 

Duck

Trump
Supporter
This is a good product, IF your engine is tired and worn and uses too much oil. If it is a healthy engine it is not needed and I would say it thickens the oil too much and would have that "parasitic drag" on your engine affecting you fuel mileage in the wrong way.
Parasitic drag refers to wind resistance. Thick oil would cause mechanical friction in the form of blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah...
 

terrylamar

Well-Known Member
Parasitic drag refers to wind resistance. Thick oil would cause mechanical friction in the form of blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah...
Which is drag!
 

TheLittleGuy

The Truckster
But the fuel manufacturer blends the fuel at the refinery.



Gear lube is not oil. Oil is carbon based, gear lube is graphite based. Gear lube will not burn like motor oils will because of that.

Nothing wrong with synthetic lubricants though, in fact most oils and gear lubes now are at least partially synthetic.



Lucas what? Lucas markets many products, including motor oils.



A good quality diesel fuel anti-gel treatment is crucial in winter months. Some fuel stations in the Northern areas actually sell a blended fuel at the pump with the anti-gel already in it.



I'm not so sure that adding gasoline in any amount is a good idea in diesel engines. With the ultra low sulfur fuel the lubricity of the fuel is already compromised. Adding gasoline would only serve to further reduce the lubricity of the fuel. This can lead to premature fuel system component failure.

But it is your truck, so if you believe it is a good thing, go for it.



Again, I don't think that adding stuff to the fuel is a great idea, other than anti-gel.
The Pilot tanker yankers and the Love's tanker yankers and the ones servicing TA/Petros in a given area goto the same supplier and get the same diesel. The only difference, is summer blend and winter blend, with the exception for the places that sell Super Diesel!

Mr. Duck has my back on which Lucas I Was referring to.


I've been doing the gas mix at every fuel stop for 3 years now. And since I'm a fuel treatment *****, the lubricity is being added back anyway.


I got this truck when it had 300k on it. Now I may be ****ing my money in the wind. But this truck runs better than it did when I got it, with the exception that the turbo is about due for some attention.
 

TheLittleGuy

The Truckster
Parasitic drag refers to wind resistance. Thick oil would cause mechanical friction in the form of blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah...
You so funny!

You're a hoot!


Or was that quack?


lol
 

RailroadRIDER

Junior Small fleet owner
Sounds like that "turbo charger" they tried to sell years ago that looked like a spiral piece of metal that went in your intake....
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Good to see some feedback on this. I listen to commercials about this product a lot and know that some large companies use them on their trucks, but don't have any "firsthand" experience with the product.

Can't wait to hear more reviews on this.
 

Duck

Trump
Supporter
Sounds like that "turbo charger" they tried to sell years ago that looked like a spiral piece of metal that went in your intake....
I think that thing was called a "tornado" or something. It supposedly would make more power or fuel efficiency by causing the air in the carb/throttle body spin in a vortex.

But when I saw that they were also trying to say that it will work if mounted to the air cleaner intake, (pre-filter) I was wondering why they don't get sued for such blatant false advertising.
 
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