Trucking Industry Driving Drivers Away

sportsou

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Current estimates are that the U.S. is shy 20,000 long-haul drivers.

A recent industry study said the shortage could rise to 111,000 drivers by 2014.

Despite demand, wages have stagnated, and turnover in the industry is running more than 100 percent. Potential drivers have migrated to construction jobs, where the pay has been better and they don’t have to be constantly away from home.

Even as the industry struggles with the shortage, talking about higher pay and attracting immigrant drivers, trucking officials say it is everyone’s problem. Trucking moves more than 70 percent of the freight in this country, making it an essential link between the consumers and the things they want and need. At some point the shortage will mean delivery delays and higher prices for consumers.

“Without truck drivers, nobody’s got food on their shelves, clothes on their racks and electronics in your big-box stores,” said John Wagner Jr., president of Wagner Industries Inc. of Kansas City. “The average age of drivers now is about 50 years old. We’ve got to find a way to attract more drivers to the industry.”

Bill Graves, a former Kansas governor and now chief executive of the American Trucking Association, says the difficulty finding drivers has become the chief concern of trucking companies, even ahead of the cost of fuel.

“Issues like fuel prices come and go, but the driver shortage has sort of become a constant drumbeat,” Graves said. “Fleet operators listed the driver shortage as their number one concern.”

Once a headache mostly for large national truckload companies, the problem now hampers the small trucking companies that make up most of the industry’s employers.

Driver turnover rates exceeded 100 percent for both large and small truckload carriers in the third quarter of 2006, according to an industry survey. Small-truckload firms, whose annual revenues are less than $30 million, reported 100 percent turnover rates for the past four quarters. That was the first time that had happened since the ATA began tracking the data in 1995.

“They create incentives for new drivers through sign-on bonuses, but those drivers quickly move on to another company that’s offering the same thing,” said Wagner, whose company provides warehousing and distribution services in several cities. “The industry is not creating a stable, permanent work force.”

The causes of the shortage are numerous. Although there is a need for more drivers, their pay has not kept pace with other industries where working conditions are better. With lots of little companies, shipping rates have been very competitive, keeping pay for long-haul drivers stagnant this decade.

Source: Kansas City Star (more)
 

Blakowt13

Well-Known Member
Current estimates are that the U.S. is shy 20,000 long-haul drivers.

A recent industry study said the shortage could rise to 111,000 drivers by 2014.

Despite demand, wages have stagnated, and turnover in the industry is running more than 100 percent. Potential drivers have migrated to construction jobs, where the pay has been better and they don’t have to be constantly away from home.
--Really?? Where? What kind of pay rates are being seen?--

Even as the industry struggles with the shortage, talking about higher pay and attracting immigrant drivers, trucking officials say it is everyone’s problem. --Already been happening before this article was created--
Trucking moves more than 70 percent of the freight in this country, making it an essential link between the consumers and the things they want and need. At some point the shortage will mean delivery delays and higher prices for consumers. --Higher prices for Fuel mean higher prices for consumers as is now evident--

“Without truck drivers, nobody’s got food on their shelves, clothes on their racks and electronics in your big-box stores,” said John Wagner Jr., president of Wagner Industries Inc. of Kansas City. “The average age of drivers now is about 50 years old. We’ve got to find a way to attract more drivers to the industry.” --Better PAY will attract more to this "profession"--

Bill Graves, a former Kansas governor and now chief executive of the American Trucking Association, says the difficulty finding drivers has become the chief concern of trucking companies, even ahead of the cost of fuel. --Too many people don't realize the full picture of driving: being away from home for more than a week, expenses OTR, other aspects of Driving, like trying to locate parking, anti-truck idling "laws", NO PARKING areas at shippers/receivers, NO TRUCKS ALLOWED, etc.

“Issues like fuel prices come and go, but the driver shortage has sort of become a constant drumbeat,” Graves said. “Fleet operators listed the driver shortage as their number one concern.” --When dispatchers treat drivers with MORE respect, WE may have some better drivers--

Once a headache mostly for large national truckload companies, the problem now hampers the small trucking companies that make up most of the industry’s employers. --Not very many small operations exist anymore--

Driver turnover rates exceeded 100 percent for both large and small truckload carriers in the third quarter of 2006, according to an industry survey. Small-truckload firms, whose annual revenues are less than $30 million, reported 100 percent turnover rates for the past four quarters. That was the first time that had happened since the ATA began tracking the data in 1995.

“They create incentives for new drivers through sign-on bonuses, but those drivers quickly move on to another company that’s offering the same thing,” said Wagner, whose company provides warehousing and distribution services in several cities. “The industry is not creating a stable, permanent work force.” --Equipment, dispatchers, company "officials", etc., help to hamper Trucking company stability for drivers--

The causes of the shortage are numerous. Although there is a need for more drivers, their pay has not kept pace with other industries where working conditions are better. With lots of little companies, shipping rates have been very competitive, keeping pay for long-haul drivers stagnant this decade.

Source: Kansas City Star (more)
Then there are the BROKErs...
 
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