New To Trucking Trucking as a retirement option

Johndeere4020

Strong opinions are not facts MJ!!
Supporter
I'd buy a heavy haul 8 axle set up. Then I would sit around bragging about phantom loads and saying how 10k isn't worth it to me on a local load.
If I could retire I’d buy a bunch of cheap fire arms and drink as much PBR as possible.
 

morongobill

Member
With all the stress involved and the current economic state of the globe and the trucking business here, why not just go out on the road and continue doing what you do now as an independent consultant. Save yourself a ton of money and grief.

But if you still plan to get into trucking, make sure you stock up with plenty of pee bottles.
 

pete159

Member
I've been driving 12 years and if I had the money I would retire tomorrow as would about 98% of drivers. Your wife will be sick of it in about 15 to 30 days. Sometime during your first trip as a company driver you will quickly realize that your job is actually a job not a retirement Hobby. also trucking is dangerous are you sure you can even handle a semi truck and trailer for at least 10 hours a day driving. Enjoy your retirement buy a nice camper and drive around America without a tight schedule. Go to Italy and Paris and then cruises I could think of a billion things I'd rather do than work, especially in a job that kills thousands of drivers each year.
 

Uncle Birchy

Life Coach
In the not too distant future, I'll be lucky enough to have the opportunity to retire at 50 years old from my current profession. I'm financially secure with good pension and retirement savings. However, I don't want to sit idle. If I could wave a magic wand, my goal would be to buy a decent used truck outright, chuck the wife in the passenger seat and hit the road, wherever I want to go, taking time off whenever we wanted. Now, I know that no such magic wand exists and there are many considerations to be made. I understand that jumping right into owner/operator isn't viable due to experience requirements by carriers and insurance, etc. I fully grasp the concept of "paying your dues" and the last thing I want to do is give the impression that I'm minimizing the hard work and years put in by those in the industry. From the research I've done it looks like the best thing to do will be to become a company driver to get some experience under my belt. With that said, because I'm not forced to drive to pay the bills, and I do have the financial backing to purchase a truck and drive with low overhead, AND I already have health/life insurance...after getting some company OTR experience under my belt, is this a viable goal? For example, drive for 6 months and take a couple months off, then pick up again when I'm ready to get back on the road. I appreciate any insight.
Dude I'm not sure how well ya set up but if ya can AFFORD IT @TXShark go with a Motorhome and a Stick-Shift Jeep to pull along and go actually "SEE" what ya wanna See and "Enjoy" yourselves
 

Attitude

New Member
In the not too distant future, I'll be lucky enough to have the opportunity to retire at 50 years old from my current profession. I'm financially secure with good pension and retirement savings. However, I don't want to sit idle. If I could wave a magic wand, my goal would be to buy a decent used truck outright, chuck the wife in the passenger seat and hit the road, wherever I want to go, taking time off whenever we wanted. Now, I know that no such magic wand exists and there are many considerations to be made. I understand that jumping right into owner/operator isn't viable due to experience requirements by carriers and insurance, etc. I fully grasp the concept of "paying your dues" and the last thing I want to do is give the impression that I'm minimizing the hard work and years put in by those in the industry. From the research I've done it looks like the best thing to do will be to become a company driver to get some experience under my belt. With that said, because I'm not forced to drive to pay the bills, and I do have the financial backing to purchase a truck and drive with low overhead, AND I already have health/life insurance...after getting some company OTR experience under my belt, is this a viable goal? For example, drive for 6 months and take a couple months off, then pick up again when I'm ready to get back on the road. I appreciate any insight.
Well except for the owner op part, that is what I did. Always wanted to drive semis, so after I retired I got a CDL (paid for by a company), and went OTR for a year. Then I found a local driving job that lets me be home everyday and off weekends. It's pretty nice. So, now I'm a company driver, have no costs for working and get my home time. Allows me to help pay for my boys college, vacations and whatever else I want without touching my 401k. Will do this until I don't feel like it anymore.
 
In the not too distant future, I'll be lucky enough to have the opportunity to retire at 50 years old from my current profession. I'm financially secure with good pension and retirement savings. However, I don't want to sit idle. If I could wave a magic wand, my goal would be to buy a decent used truck outright, chuck the wife in the passenger seat and hit the road, wherever I want to go, taking time off whenever we wanted. Now, I know that no such magic wand exists and there are many considerations to be made. I understand that jumping right into owner/operator isn't viable due to experience requirements by carriers and insurance, etc. I fully grasp the concept of "paying your dues" and the last thing I want to do is give the impression that I'm minimizing the hard work and years put in by those in the industry. From the research I've done it looks like the best thing to do will be to become a company driver to get some experience under my belt. With that said, because I'm not forced to drive to pay the bills, and I do have the financial backing to purchase a truck and drive with low overhead, AND I already have health/life insurance...after getting some company OTR experience under my belt, is this a viable goal? For example, drive for 6 months and take a couple months off, then pick up again when I'm ready to get back on the road. I appreciate any insight.
Here's another one "retiring" from 1 job to come ruin something that has been my career and my father's and his father before him proudly. I can't retire and go into your profession so why at your age jump into my profession and ruin everything because none of you are being taught correctly. In 1987 from day 1 when I got my license I was on my own no "driver trainer" any of that crap if you can't ****ing drive how the hell do you hold a valid CDL!
 

Thunder Road

Well-Known Member
Be a company driver for at least 12 months before investing any money in a truck.
Become a member of www.OOIDA.com which is a business website for the owner-operator.
Plenty of companies will let you take the wife along after you complete training.
Are you in Texas?
 

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