Transitioning From Mileage to Hourly Based Pay

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
#81
The delays are really bad in the skateboard world..., most of the shippers/receivers only load and unload between 7 and 3, and average deadhead is further for the flatbed market than reefers and dry van. It's a real balancing act sometimes to get unloaded in a timely manner so you can deadhead to your pickup before they close up shop. Pretty much any delay costs you half a days revenue, which is a hard hit. I have no doubt half the trucks getting caught in these snowy pile-ups are only on the road because of that clock. You can't just stop a few hours to let the storm pass and then start earlier than normal to make up time. So everybody pushes on despite the road conditions.
So flatheaders are a bunch of greedy bazturds who have no regard for putting the public at risk in their daily money grab?
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
Thread starter #87
The delays are really bad in the skateboard world..., most of the shippers/receivers only load and unload between 7 and 3, and average deadhead is further for the flatbed market than reefers and dry van. It's a real balancing act sometimes to get unloaded in a timely manner so you can deadhead to your pickup before they close up shop. Pretty much any delay costs you half a days revenue, which is a hard hit. I have no doubt half the trucks getting caught in these snowy pile-ups are only on the road because of that clock. You can't just stop a few hours to let the storm pass and then start earlier than normal to make up time. So everybody pushes on despite the road conditions.
This is not a personal attack on you. It's a response to the assertion that flats face the worst delays and it's a micro-rant about a guy from yesterday.

I got stuck behind a ****ing flatbedder yesterday at my first stop. There was plenty of room at the receiver for him to park three feet one way or the other to leave a passageway. He parked dead center and cocked his tractor at an angle, blocking the entire driveway. He had just taken the bungees off his tarps when I got there. So while he was removing and folding tarps, I got rid of the five pallets I had to drop, thinking (mistakenly) that he might have other business to get to, so he'd be gittin'r done. By the time I dropped and got my paperwork, he was on the second tarp. I was kind of stuck because there were store customers behind me. And this guy, knowing I needed to leave, wandered off for 15 minutes before returning, looking right at me and pulling down his third tarp. He was in no hurry to get anywhere or let me get anywhere either. 45 minutes later (I'd been there for an hour and a half by now) there was enough space behind me that I could back into the main parking lot and exit through the car entrance to the store. Buddy was working on tarp number four. He made an all-damn-day deal out of 26 pallets of fire logs. If I had been loaded with those same 26 pallets, I would have been gone within a half hour of my arrival..without a dock to back to.

A delay is sitting for three days after arriving on time to your shipper because they haven't slaughtered enough hogs yet. Or waiting for the chicken truck to get there so Tyson can fill the rest of the order. Or waiting for the field workers to come off strike and pick the lettuce you were brought in two days ago to haul. Or being stuck in Wakefern's parking lot for the entire Thanksgiving weekend because even though you arrived on time for your Wednesday morning appointment, they don't have room in their warehouse for the Cool Whip they ordered.

There is a really good reason I don't haul grocery from producers to DCs anymore. The delays are outrageous. Neither shippers nor receivers give the first **** about the driver's time, they all waste entire days and then, when the freight is finally loaded, it is extremely time sensitive. They want the cherries you picked up in Pateros, WA to be at the WalMart DC in Johnstown, NY four days after your pickup appointment time, but they waste 12 hours of that time making you wait to get loaded. And we wind up with grocery haulers in a big damn hurry regardless of weather and road conditions. I do not miss OTR grocery.
 

Drifter McDuck

Well-Known Member
#90
Yeah I did reefer cans for a while, and the frozen food places are definitely not in a hurry. @Injun there are no excuses for that... I always pull out of the way to remove tarps.
 

Drifter McDuck

Well-Known Member
#91
So flatheaders are a bunch of greedy bazturds who have no regard for putting the public at risk in their daily money grab?
My reference to being on the road in bad weather applies to all types of freight movers. I personally will just take the loss before driving through a bad snow storm. I took my chances last month because it was only a 20 mile squall line I needed to get through, but super-trucker in his Kenny took me out within the first 2 miles. There are just way too many "I know how to drive in the snow" super-idiots running way too fast for road and traffic conditions. The guys who fly through congested traffic, running 20 mph faster than everyone else are just meat-heads.
 
#92
This is not a personal attack on you. It's a response to the assertion that flats face the worst delays and it's a micro-rant about a guy from yesterday.

I got stuck behind a ****ing flatbedder yesterday at my first stop. There was plenty of room at the receiver for him to park three feet one way or the other to leave a passageway. He parked dead center and cocked his tractor at an angle, blocking the entire driveway. He had just taken the bungees off his tarps when I got there. So while he was removing and folding tarps, I got rid of the five pallets I had to drop, thinking (mistakenly) that he might have other business to get to, so he'd be gittin'r done. By the time I dropped and got my paperwork, he was on the second tarp. I was kind of stuck because there were store customers behind me. And this guy, knowing I needed to leave, wandered off for 15 minutes before returning, looking right at me and pulling down his third tarp. He was in no hurry to get anywhere or let me get anywhere either. 45 minutes later (I'd been there for an hour and a half by now) there was enough space behind me that I could back into the main parking lot and exit through the car entrance to the store. Buddy was working on tarp number four. He made an all-damn-day deal out of 26 pallets of fire logs. If I had been loaded with those same 26 pallets, I would have been gone within a half hour of my arrival..without a dock to back to.

A delay is sitting for three days after arriving on time to your shipper because they haven't slaughtered enough hogs yet. Or waiting for the chicken truck to get there so Tyson can fill the rest of the order. Or waiting for the field workers to come off strike and pick the lettuce you were brought in two days ago to haul. Or being stuck in Wakefern's parking lot for the entire Thanksgiving weekend because even though you arrived on time for your Wednesday morning appointment, they don't have room in their warehouse for the Cool Whip they ordered.

There is a really good reason I don't haul grocery from producers to DCs anymore. The delays are outrageous. Neither shippers nor receivers give the first **** about the driver's time, they all waste entire days and then, when the freight is finally loaded, it is extremely time sensitive. They want the cherries you picked up in Pateros, WA to be at the WalMart DC in Johnstown, NY four days after your pickup appointment time, but they waste 12 hours of that time making you wait to get loaded. And we wind up with grocery haulers in a big damn hurry regardless of weather and road conditions. I do not miss OTR grocery.
No offense, he does sound like he was pretty lazy.

That being said I would've been out there and helped him roll tarps. Two reasons, one is it's part of the brotherhood rules. Second is he's in my way I'll go help so he's out of my way.

I've been in that situation. 5-10 minutes of helping flip tarps saved me 30 minutes of watching him do it alone. I'm already out of the truck working so to wander over and help isn't a big deal
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
Thread starter #93
No offense, he does sound like he was pretty lazy.

That being said I would've been out there and helped him roll tarps. Two reasons, one is it's part of the brotherhood rules. Second is he's in my way I'll go help so he's out of my way.

I've been in that situation. 5-10 minutes of helping flip tarps saved me 30 minutes of watching him do it alone. I'm already out of the truck working so to wander over and help isn't a big deal
Try being a female driving a van and do that. I've gotten my head bit off enough.
 

dave350

Well-Known Member
Try being a female driving a van and do that. I've gotten my head bit off enough.
Really? I wouldn't have thought that. I've never seen prejudice when it comes to flipping tarps.

That's kind of sad.
I agree. That’s not only sad but it speaks volumes about the individual behaving like that. I tried to help others and never turned down help no matter who it was.
 
Top