super singles thoughts and input

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
It's a ProStar, FFS. I dunno who's gonna be a'skeert o'that. Putting spikes on Girly's lugnuts'd be like puttin' perfume on a skunk. It'd be more amusing than anything else.

I'd just get longer rounded covers if there's going to be that much stud hangin' out. Girly does love her modesty. She doesn't like her nuts and studs showing.

It's not my truck folks need to be scared of. It's me on my motorcycle when they do stupid ****.

My mom actually asked me about those long spiked lugnut covers. She was afraid that they could scrape up a car if it went by at a normal distance. So I pointed out to her that the truck's mirrors stick out way further than that and if anyone is close enough for those plastic decorations to do anything to their car, the last thing they'll be concerned about is a scratch on the paint job.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
So let's review... according to y'all, I should have been, bankrupt, rolled over in the ditch, dead, burned up, 'n stuck in a snowbank somewhere because I run these deadly, dangerous tires, that blow up regularily.

None of that's happened.

I own my truck, so yeah, I take care of my equipment. One road service call in six years. That's it. No accidents... especially due to these hazardous tires I run, which means I've never engaged the services of a hook.

Hassles??? None.

Most of what y'all are saying about these tires, I'll write off to trucker BS stories.

Can these tires not provide a fuel economy savings? You betcha! Y'all need to understand rolling resistance because a high rolling resistance wide single (like a Michelin XDN2) won't get ya there. A Michelin X-One Line tire will perform admirably.

So put what ever tire you like on your truck, because I couldn't care less what ya do. But I will say all the scare stories you hear about these tires are BS, and excuses used by careless company drivers to cover their negligence.
 
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mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
Most of us are just saying that it's just not the price of converting a truck with duals to wide.

At least running the same tires truck and trailer I can rotate my drives with life in them still to a trailer.

If you like em, knock yourself out.
 
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ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
Most of us are just saying that it's just not the price of converting a truck with duals to wide.

At least running the same tires truck and trailer I can rotate my drives with life in them still to a trailer.

If you like em, knock yourself out.
Unless I found a deal on the rims and used tires (which is quite possible) I wouldn't convert either. You can get nearly the same savings by using say a Michelin X-One Line D tire... its a dual.
 
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mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
you don't need to buy Michelin's either to get a decent low rolling resistant tire either.

the best list I can find. I just wish it was more up to date on the models and RR.
America Moves By Truck (AMBT) - Moving America, one truck at a time

My firestones are rated a 117. Michelin XDA2+ is a 115. XDA Energy is a 100.

But the extra cost, fuel savings supposedly from them and all, it's a wash.

There's more to all of it than just lowest Rolling resistant tire.
 
But I will say all the scare stories you hear about these tires are BS, and excuses used by careless company drivers to cover their negligence.
What negligence? All that was said is that they broke loose in rainy conditions climbing a hill on a rutted road. Your contact patch is smaller per hub end with those things.
 
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Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
Alright, guys...that will be all.

Okay, guys.. I used the blue stuff on purpose. I cleaned the mess up and gave the thread a rest for a day.




Let's try to be cognizant of the presentation or next time, I'm using the red stuff.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
IBTL.....
 

krelithous

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I won't buy em when a tire blows you might as well kiss the rim good bye also:mad: and you can't limp over the the truck stop to get it fixed like you can with two singles:stare1:
 

Hunter

Well-Known Member
I will put it right on Front street, I have never driven a truck with super single. However it would stand to reason that a fat tire would ride on top of snow or deep water. Hydroplaning. That is why they use big fat tires on farm equipment to keep them from sinking into the mud. That is the exact opposite of what I want out of a tire when driving in snow.
I want the tire(s) to cut right through the snow and get down to the road beneath the snow.
sorry never read all the quotes.
but this quotes holds true, though I've never dealt with super singles but have talked to those that drive them, let alone some common sense things about size of tires & tracks.
wider the tire = more its able to float through mud/soft ground & displacement of weight on the road when needed. & slide on the slick with less edge gripping the surface.
normal signals (duals) give that extra grip that will bust through water, mud, snow. unlike the super signals.
this has been common knowledge since WWII, wide tracks will allow you to float through some surfaces, & this is why tracked vehicles have wide tracks since then.
it's your call what you prefer for the job you do.

the only plus side for super signals on the road I see is to displace weight for legal reasons, other than that none unless you want to float paved roads. again road/highway use, off road I can see using them.
 
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Anyone remember a company called Cannon Express?

They were out of Arkansas. They ran steer tire tread all around...trailer and all...for lower rolling resistance and increased fuel mileage.

They hardly ever sent trucks up north in winter.
I drove for them from 08/02-12/03 and honestly don't remember that. It was common to put used steers on trls industry wide I remember that but i was there after the founder left.
 
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