Some cold war sh&&t..... and strong as hell....

Daxaero

Well-Known Member
Serbs bought these ones back in 1965. They are stil in service after 50 years. In Mongolia you will often go through unpaved roads, and to reach some places you will drive accross mountains, muds, forrests so locals are getting old russian machines for cheap and converting those into civil. This beasts don't need any roads, it will make it for itself ;)

 

Southern Fried

Well-Known Member
Russia does know how to build rugged.

One thought was going through my mind while watching the vid.

"Well great, I do it a thousand times perfectly and the one day I fark up the whole dam world is watching me".

I know your pain driver. :D
 

Daxaero

Well-Known Member
Here in Bosnia you can see numerous old russian trucks working for individuals. Those are log trucks, almost all of them are 6x6 or 8x8. Actualy, everithing that is abnormal in whole world is just fine in Bosnia. One of those from bosnia in attachements
 

Attachments

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
Here in Bosnia you can see numerous old russian trucks working for individuals. Those are log trucks, almost all of them are 6x6 or 8x8. Actualy, everithing that is abnormal in whole world is just fine in Bosnia. One of those from bosnia in attachements
In America they put tires like that on Pick up trucks and crush cars just for fun.
 

Daxaero

Well-Known Member
It has a russian sopfisticated way of steering. Very simple yet powerfull and reliable steering mechanism ment to be easy to fix if it breaks on road. You can ateer this thing with one finger :D
 

Southern Fried

Well-Known Member
When I had my business "up home" part of it was delivering Belarus farm tractors. Those things (and the rigs shown here) were built the way we used to build stuff..... strong. Yup, they were ugly compared to JD and the other fancy brands and the Russia designed wiring would make a saint cuss but you had to be dedicated stupid to break one. Plus they were waaaay cheaper to purchase.

Example; I hauled one of their top-line 110 hp, 4wd tractors to a farm show. All told we had 3 tractors plus a haybind and a baler. Right across the aisle was the JD display featuring their latest 150hp, fibregass cab, A/c and stereo equipped croos between a tractor and a Ferrari that alone cost more than Belarus' entire display plus what they were paying me. :D

The JD rep told me that they'd been trying to prep their fancy rig for a month. Thing wouldn't start no matter what they did. Turned out to be a $.75 sensor in the electronic controls that wasn't showing up on their "diagnostic equipment".
 

Daxaero

Well-Known Member
Not a truck or a road vehicle, but an example of russian simplicity. Since im a holder of proffessional pilot licence, but not working as a pilot, i often fly for hoby or with friends to Italy on summer etc.... anyway i had an oportunity to be a witness of an situation between a french aircraft and russian pilot and his Tupolev. French was flying Airbus with LCD displays (EFIS so called in aviation) and russian flown Tupolev with all analog instruments. Once Airbus got malfunctioned and lost it's 3 displays at once and automaticly he lost more than 5 important instruments which were represented in those displays. It did had instruments at first officer side but still it was unflyable and had to be fixed. It was such a problem that took 3 days to get fixed because mechanics and spare parts had to be transported from France. Somebody asked a russian what he would do because it would take a much longer if russian airplane got stucked in that situation. Russian pilot just smiled, went to his Tupolev and showed us a metal case with basic tools and spare analog instruments. That guy fix it's own aircraft if something breaks in cockpit because tupolev was intended to be as simple as possible, yet extremely strong. In case, Tu-154 is second fastest airliner after Concorde, and fastest in use today :)
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
When I had my business "up home" part of it was delivering Belarus farm tractors. Those things (and the rigs shown here) were built the way we used to build stuff..... strong. Yup, they were ugly compared to JD and the other fancy brands and the Russia designed wiring would make a saint cuss but you had to be dedicated stupid to break one. Plus they were waaaay cheaper to purchase.

Example; I hauled one of their top-line 110 hp, 4wd tractors to a farm show. All told we had 3 tractors plus a haybind and a baler. Right across the aisle was the JD display featuring their latest 150hp, fibregass cab, A/c and stereo equipped croos between a tractor and a Ferrari that alone cost more than Belarus' entire display plus what they were paying me. :D

The JD rep told me that they'd been trying to prep their fancy rig for a month. Thing wouldn't start no matter what they did. Turned out to be a $.75 sensor in the electronic controls that wasn't showing up on their "diagnostic equipment".
What was the brand name the USSR tractors you where delivering?
 

Southern Fried

Well-Known Member
What was the brand name the USSR tractors you where delivering?
Belarus tractors, but you make the same mistake as so many others. The only thing built in Russia was the castings for the trans/gearbox. They had an assembly plant in Canada and another in the USA. I don't remember right off the exact locations. Used a whole heck of a lot of North American components. Kind of how Pontiac was built in Canada with Chevy components.

By contrast the "American Brands" were all using the same mid-size tractor built entirely in Czechoslovakia and branding it with their name and paint colors.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
Belarus tractors, but you make the same mistake as so many others. The only thing built in Russia was the castings for the trans/gearbox. They had an assembly plant in Canada and another in the USA. I don't remember right off the exact locations. Used a whole heck of a lot of North American components. Kind of how Pontiac was built in Canada with Chevy components.

By contrast the "American Brands" were all using the same mid-size tractor built entirely in Czechoslovakia and branding it with their name and paint colors.
I said USSR tractors not Russian tractors. Belarus was a part of the USSR, Not Russia so no mistake was made on my part.
Yet you still did not give a brand name for the Belarus tractors you delivered.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
I know they sell Mahindra Tractors in America. They are built in India and very tough and very basic as far as fixing goes.
 

Southern Fried

Well-Known Member
Actually RJ, I apologize for that one. I'm truly sorry you're from Toronto. No.... wait.... that didn't sound right. Let's try again. Toronto's sorry...... well, yes they are but.....that's not right either. I'm gonna have to think about this one..... maybe get back to you next week or so.

Hey, did you know that Toronto regularly sends Care packages to the Maritimes??? It's true..... we fill them up and send them back. :D

Anyhow.... history lesson here.... pay attention, quiz for points coming.

The USSR was always Russia. The state of Belarus declared independence from the collapsing USSR in 1991. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/country_profiles/1118391.stm

The Belarus tractors were produced in Minsk and quickly became the world's largest tractor manufacturer. In North America they are under http://www.mtzequipment.com/

Like I said, cheaper, old-style rugged and dependable as taxes.

Oh yeah, the quiz...... you missed passing by 2 points. Better luck next time.
 
Top