Truck Repair Service life on parts

Nomad1

Well-Known Member
Well **** me sideways bought new batteries fall of 2017. Having charging and starting issues. Replaced the alternator twice, not any difference. Replaced all four batteries when I did the second alternator, now we’re getting them starting and charging. One battery was junk, which I suspect would cause a draw on the other three.

Using a cheap multimeter I showed a 0.25-0.45 amp draw on the negative side of the batteries. A battery disconnect may be in my future

One year seems to be my magic number on parts. Brand new parts lasting a year. Good grief

Batteries are $85 each. Core charge of $30. I guess $220 every fall we stuff in new ones
Stop buying cheap batteries. How bad does your truck bounce those batteries around? Are your wires all good?
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
Stop buying cheap batteries. How bad does your truck bounce those batteries around? Are your wires all good?
It's not so much the cables, but corrosion in the connections that cause most troubles. Especially on the ground side.
 

Nomad1

Well-Known Member
It's not so much the cables, but corrosion in the connections that cause most troubles. Especially on the ground side.
Yeah. I assumed he would find any problems like that if he checked out the cables. If the cables take a beating the ends begin breaking also.
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
One of the things that often gets skipped over is a thorough cleaning of all the the cable ends. When changing the batteries, each cable end should be cleaned on the bench wheel until it looks like a new penny.

And the 579 I had, the factory battery cables were equipped with some sort of rubber insulation over the connection ends that prevented solid contact, so I ended up ****-canning them and putting in good, old-fashioned copper-end cables.
 
One of the things that often gets skipped over is a thorough cleaning of all the the cable ends. When changing the batteries, each cable end should be cleaned on the bench wheel until it looks like a new penny.

And the 579 I had, the factory battery cables were equipped with some sort of rubber insulation over the connection ends that prevented solid contact, so I ended up ****-canning them and putting in good, old-fashioned copper-end cables.
Mine have been cleaned, and I use the protectant spray a couple times a year to coat the connections.

Batteries are definitely something to keep an eye on, every service they get looked at
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
Bad ground

IMG_20180418_194126590_LL.jpg


His repair
Pulled it off by hand
IMG_20180426_154713980_HDR.jpg



My repair of his repair
IMG_20180426_154650499.jpg
 

Nomad1

Well-Known Member
You have that fancy crimper, don’t you?
I think the fancy crumpet looks cool but I doubt it does any better than a bolt in a vise and then a pile of solder and then some heat shrink tubing and then electrical tape.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
I think the fancy crumpet looks cool but I doubt it does any better than a bolt in a vise and then a pile of solder and then some heat shrink tubing and then electrical tape.
A proper crimping tool does a whole lot better job than just mashing the lug in a vise. If you're going to live with a mechanical connection on a high current cable, you have to do it right, or you're just going to cause yourself more problems.

If you're going to do a soldered connection, something with that much metal involved is going to need a torch and solder pellets to heat the components properly, and make a good joint.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
I'm think 12-ton of crimping pressure is adequate.

Even that little one I have is like 8-ton
 
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