Fuel Economy Series 60 Fuel Mileage battle.....

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
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4.6 whopping mpg

I did cover 640 miles though today. Considering the ground is had to go through. I'd say that's pretty good.

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mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
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6.3 mpg today.
Pretty decent one too. 620 miles with an unload, reload. One of the excavator had a dead battery again.
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Both loads were over 75,000 gross weight


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ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
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What with the crummy weather, that ain't too bad. I got a 6.4 mpg, and then jumped to 8.12. about 74,000 off the right weighs.

Don't expect to get the mileage I was at Prime... trailers have duals, so there goes about 0.5+ mpg.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
Huh.


Main ground wire from the battery to the frame. This is the frame side

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Yeah, there's some heating in there too. And for a ground to show heat.....

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mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
5.7 MPG, 78,600 gross. Tarped steel

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Back through the gorge today too.
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Last night my inverter really went nuts. Sounded like something popped.

Getting E01 an E02 under and over volt faults. Flipping from 10.2 to 13.9 volts.

Unplugged the extension cord for the control panel and put the control panel back under the bunk.

Seems to be better now.
 
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mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
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These are becoming more common. Ran from Sparta to Milwaukee an ran across wi-16/60 to I-41 to deliver and the pick up a set of loading ramps and come back the same route. About 2/3 of those miles are 2-lane surface streets.
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Even with heavy loads like this
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Ran up the I90 hill at lacrosse on the mn/wi border 1600 rpm at 71 mph with that load. Guages indicated 79,000 pounds.
 
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mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
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Got home about a month ago and put new ends on the ground cable the guy made for me. He used a hammer and chisel to "crimp" the ends.

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I actually pulled them off by hand.
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I put new ends on with the correct size lug hole too. The correct size is 3/8". Not 1/2".

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mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
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The crimper I used I borrowed from a friend who's an electrician. I figured if it's adequate for putting in commercial wiring. ;)

8 ton of clamping force.

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Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Getting my first reading today at some point since getting my truck back. Showing good per the ECM, but truck still having some issues. Not sure if carried over from repair, or created by repair.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
These are the kinds of results I get with "typical" fuel. The fuel in the tank was from Love's in Illinois. I can't get anyone to give me any information on cetane at Love's.
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That 200 gallons of fuel from Sparta gave me this number. Half empty, half at 62,000#.

The fuel in Sparta is treated with Schaeffer oil diesel fuel tratment and a 48+ centane index.

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I'll be refueling at Ladysmith again tomorrow. I put on their premium fuel. They said their cetane is 50-52 for premium.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
I'm absolutely not questioning your results, but factors like the difference in aerodynamic drag presented by your load configuration, wind, road surface temperature, kind of road surfacing and tire inflation are going to have something to do with your results as well. It's certainly going to affect what you're seeing.

For example... down yonder in Tejas Y'all, they've got those chip and seal road surfaces everywhere. I see a huge difference between the polished concrete (better) on say I20, and when I get off onto state and US highways (worse) because of that.
 

mndriver

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Supporter
These two loads are what was on the truck for the 5.8. It was that way from the start of the load and the fuel mileage never changed. Loaded it in Marion oh for the steel and ft Riley up to ft McCoy. All from Friday to Tuesday. I wasn't in a hurry either. 66-67 mph. Cruise set right at 1500-1525 rpm.

Pulling this should have been 5.8. anything but aerodynamic.
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The only thing against this was weight. I had to open the trailer tandem due to the weight being 35,000#
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The 7.7 was 32,000# on the deck of concrete pole barricade. Think jersy barriers but about 2' tall and 20' long. They are used by a power company to store telephone/power poles on them in the yard. I'll post a picture of that load later today.

The 5.8 load was all Interstate roads.

The 7.7 mpg was all 2- lane, small US highway across wi/mn/wi. With lots of small town slowing down and stopping. Even that had an open tandem. Mn95 and us8 is all chip coat.

Tires? Come on. This is all in the last 5 days. It's been 80-96 degrees the entire time.

Load configuration is about the only thing going against me here on part of this thing. I had two identical loads to haul yesterday and today. The pole barricades to a new construction site 250 miles from my house. The shipper is directly in my backyard. So the routes will be the same, the load, the same. Even down to time of day.

Talking with Mike Mike about this, the thought is that both my truck and JunkYardDog5958 JunkYardDog5958 truvks are hyper-sensitive to fuel quality because of the tune we have on our engine. Much like some hot rods have to have 91 octane fuel, ours require 48+ cetane or better.

Mike Mike has a guy in Missouri we are looking at getting some work done. He's got a "fuel modification" that supposedly allows more fuel flow and reduced fuel temperature that allows for less cetane degradation is how it was explained to me.

Considering most cetane increase is done chemically, I can see where the increased fuel temps might cook off those higher volatile chemicals.

There's been plenty of company road challenges that show similar results to what I am seeing that match. Poor quality fuel, while cheaper at the pump, cost significantly more in increased fuel consumption over time compared to premium fuel. Think 40 - 43 cetane vs 48+ cetane.
 
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mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
Yeah, I'm a bit cautious about saying these are truly honest and likely marketing. But I'm seeing similar performance by sticking to premium fuel over standard truckstop fuel. I've been asking lots of my fuel stops for the cetane index. Most will take the time to get what you ask, others won't.


I am NOT using cenex Roadmaster premium fuel. But I am getting the ambest premium 2000 when I can or Kwik Trip premium in the Midwest.


 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
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I'm not sure buying fuel with a pumped up Cetane Index buys us that much. It's a chemical rating that tells us how likely we're going to be affected by poor ignition in the fuel. That can certainly affect the efficiency of the engine, but if a lack of Cetane was the cause, I'd expect your engine to be running rough as well.

Cetane number (cetane rating) is an indicator of the combustion speed of diesel fuel and compression needed for ignition. It is an inverse of the similar octane rating for gasoline. The CN is an important factor in determining the quality of diesel fuel, but not the only one; other measurements of diesel's quality include (but are not limited to) energy content, density, lubricity, cold-flow properties and sulphur content.[1]

Cetane Number

The Cetane Index is a calculation that should be equal to or exceeded by the actual Cetane Number (content) if the fuel.

Cetane index is used as a substitute for the cetane number of diesel fuel. The cetane index is calculated based on the fuel's densityand distillation range (ASTM D86). There are two methods used, ASTM D976 and D4737. The older D976, or "two-variable equation" is outdated and should no longer be used for cetane number estimation. It is, however, still required by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an alternative method for satisfying its aromaticityrequirement for diesel fuel. D4737 is the newest method and is sometimes referred to as "the four-variable equation". D4737 is the same method as ISO 4264. Cetane index in some crude oil assays is often referred to as Cetane calcule, while the cetane number is referred to as Cetane measure.

Cetane Index

So is a little extra whatever (2-ethylhexyl nitrate) really going to affect you that much? I'm kind of dubious of that. I'd think total energy content if the fuel would have to change a lot to be totally responsible for that kind of swing.

BTW, our fuel card has me at TAs mostly.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
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What kind of tires are you running?
 
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