Schneider National Rolls Out New, Increased Pay Package

sportsou

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Schneider National, Inc. Fattens Driver Paychecks Up To $4,500 Per Year

GREEN BAY, Wis. – August 13, 2007 – Schneider National Inc., the nation’s largest truckload carrier, today announced a major pay increase for its company driver fleet. Under the new pay package, effective September 30, drivers at Schneider will earn up to $4,500 more per year. In addition, the company has improved its driver dispatch program to get more drivers home on a weekly basis.
“These pay improvements represent our commitment to providing one of the best total compensation packages in the industry,” said Mark Rourke, Schneider National president, truckload. “It also highlights that drivers and customers are the lifeblood of Schneider National. This pay increase allows us to continue to retain and attract the best and brightest drivers in order to deliver the level of service our customers expect and deserve.”

One of the largest driver pay increases in Schneider history, Rourke noted that the company’s investment in its drivers goes beyond pay to address work-life balance. Recent changes in Schneider National’s driver dispatch system have sweetened driver time at home. Nearly two-thirds of Schneider drivers now get home daily or weekly.

The company’s new compensation program is for Schneider mileage-based over-the-road, dedicated and bulk drivers. Specific details on the pay increase are as follows:
· Inexperienced drivers receive company-provided training and will earn
$.30–$.34 per mile ($36,000-$46,000 per year)
· Experienced drivers with one-year experience will earn $.39-$.42
per mile
· Experienced drivers with three-years experience will earn $.40-$.43
per mile
· Experienced drivers with five-years-plus experience will earn $.41-
$.455 per mile
Note: Compensation varies by region of the country where the driver operates.

Gordon Klemp, president of the National Transportation Institute, which tracks driver pay trends through its National Survey of Driver Wages, said this pay increase announcement is particularly significant given the softening of the freight industry in 2007. “This increase puts Schneider among the top tier for both pay and benefits, something all drivers are looking for when deciding where they’d like to work,” said Klemp. “Schneider is one of the first truckload carriers in 2007 to announce a pay increase, and drivers will certainly take note.”

The environment for recruiting and retaining drivers is more competitive than ever. “We believe that paying our drivers more is simply the right thing to do,” continued Rourke. “We know our success lies in leading the industry by retaining and building our core of safe, experienced drivers and a reliable workforce to ensure our customers have the service they need when they need it.”

For more information about a driving career with Schneider National, visit Schneider National - Truck Driving Jobs – Great Job Opportunities in the Transportation Industry – Drive for the Best
or call 1-800-44-PRIDE (1-800-447-7433).

About Schneider National Inc.
Schneider National Inc. is a premier provider of truckload, logistics and intermodal services. Serving more than two-thirds of the FORTUNE 500 companies, Schneider National offers the broadest portfolio of services in the industry. The company’s transportation and logistics solutions include One-Way, Intermodal, Transportation Management, Dedicated and Bulk. With wholly owned subsidiaries Schneider Logistics, American Port Services and American Overseas Logistics, Schneider National is the only truckload carrier to offer customers end-to-end domestic and international logistics solutions.

Headquartered in Green Bay, Wis., Schneider National has provided expert transportation and logistics solutions for more than 70 years. A $3.7 billion company, Schneider National conducts business in more than 28 countries in North America, Europe and Asia and continues to grow its international service offerings. For more information about Schneider National visit Schneider National - Home page or call (800) 558-6767.


Media Contacts:

Schneider National
Janet Bonkowski, APR
(920) 592-2865
Janet Bonkowski

Hiebing
Barb Hernandez
(608) 268-4390
Barb Hernandez
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I don't mind companies putting potentially better pay in by using bonuses, as long as the bonuses are attainable.

Give me a truck that runs 75 MPH, and an attainable fuel bonus, and I will be running that truck under 65 MPH most of the time. When the temperature is comfortable, I will keep the engine turned off.

I have no problem treating a company truck like it is mine, and as if I am running my own business, if you are willing to pay me a little more than you pay others who are out there running the truck as fast as it will go, and leaving it running everywhere they stop.

Not saying this is the case with Schneider, just my thought on bonuses in general. I think there should be something attainable in place to reward drivers to treat their job like it is their business.
 

Roadmedic

Well-Known Member
There's the rub. Attainable. I have heard and read many stories about Schneider and their idle policy. Them like other companies do whatever they can to discourage running the truck. Drivers like myself who cannot stand to be in smoked filled areas usually elect to stay in the truck. What fun it is if you cannot run a tv or have to sweat or freeze for the bonus that cannot be had. In other words, they know they are making it back from you.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Exactly. If you make it where I have to suffer to get the bonus, you can stick the bonus up your ass :). I will be comfortable in the truck, and any company that truly cares about the drivers would factor that into the equation.

You treat me well, I will treat your equipment like it was mine.
 

Roadmedic

Well-Known Member
So why don't the companies just pay the rate and forget fuel bonus?

Adding fuel bonus, safety bonus and telling me that is what I make and could possibly earn seems deceptive.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I see your point, but I look at both sides of it. There are too many drivers out there that could care less about anything and make it a point to leave a truck running all the time, regardless what the temperature is, even when they are not in the truck.

Running the truck needlessly,and driving as fast as the truck will go constantly costs the company money that they shouldn't have to pay. I see our drivers, parked at the receiver where we often deliver running there trucks all night long, when the temperature is 50 degrees outside. They don't have the A/C or heat on, they are just idling their trucks out of habit. Just like I see truckers leave their trucks running in cool weather, when they are going into the truck stop. I just don't understand it.

if you have drivers that run the trucks responsibly, I think there should be a plan in place to pay them more than those who simply don't care. But, the bonuses need to be attainable.
 
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