Researching potentials

NewStartX

Member
I've decided to embrace my inner Introvert. I did a Monster search for jobs that require isolation...and this was one that didn't require a PHD or involve scrubbing toilets. I've 40 something and had a few careers that all went no where. I'm working in a Factory at the moment.

I'm in GA and trying to evaluate CDL OJT vs school. I'm leaning toward OJT just because it's feasible; but who to go with? I'm perfectly willing to get my permit to show commitment.

Seems like the biggest downsides- time away from home, family, etc are strengths for me. No kids, never married, no girl-friend, no house (sucks sort of)... so no reason I can't relocate in a short time frame. My driving record is clean for last 10 years.

Will it be enough to get started? That's what I'm trying to sort out.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
Yeah, it is a pretty good job for those that enjoy not interacting with people frequently.
I am in the same boat as you no kids, no wife, no gf, But I wouldn't call myself an introvert. I am good with people for about 20 mins at a time and then I am done!
Trucking is very good for those that enjoy solitude, Just be sure you are not the type to get into your own head too much, Because it can literally make you crazy.

Good luck and welcome.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
Yeah, it is a pretty good job for those that enjoy not interacting with people frequently.
I am in the same boat as you no kids, no wife, no gf, But I wouldn't call myself an introvert. I am good with people for about 20 mins at a time and then I am done!
Trucking is very good for those that enjoy solitude, Just be sure you are not the type to get into your own head too much, Because it can literally make you crazy.

Good luck and welcome.
Legit the same way. I get social exhaustion. It's actually a thing.
 

NewStartX

Member
Tried asking around on existing threads vs starting new ones; but taking constructive advice about carriers that offer paid CDL training that aren't going to deliberately screw me over or run me off after training. Rehl is local but haven't found any decent reviews. Not opposed to relocating; just prefer to avoid the East Coast.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
Tried asking around on existing threads vs starting new ones; but taking constructive advice about carriers that offer paid CDL training that aren't going to deliberately screw me over or run me off after training. Rehl is local but haven't found any decent reviews. Not opposed to relocating; just prefer to avoid the East Coast.
Most of these companies are what you make of them and depend on your tolerance for certain types of BS. There's BS everywhere, even at the best jobs. But the best job for you is defined by having more pros than cons and the cons being of the type you can handle.

Another job might have just as many pros and cons but if the cons (the BS) are of the type that don't fit with your personality/ethos/work ethic then it's not sustainable.

Chances of changing jobs are almost 100% so don't even worry if the first one isn't a fit. Just get your license, tolerate it a year, and move on to another job. The beautiful thing about trucking is you can keep trying different things to see what works.

But here's some job changing advice. If you don't like OTR at one mega, don't go OTR at another mega. The only difference will be the decals on your truck.

If anything, see if your carrier has a different department or division that you can try because often times it's not the company, it's the work. Some guys are suited to flat bed. Some prefer tanker, some would rather do rail, others reefer, and some actually like the open road of dry. Some companies are big enough to have many of those things and you don't have to change employers.

Eg I do local rail work for Schneider. I like most aspects of it. I would HATE OTR with Schneider. Most of us at Schneider rail would. Because it's a completely different experience despite the trucks being the same color.

Doing the same job with different companies is how you never discover what you really like and makes you miserable, and keeps you job hopping.

BTW sometimes you'll simply find yourself bored and want to change for the sake of change. You can do that too.
 

NewStartX

Member
I'm still learning the lingo. Reefer, Rail, etc.. tanker sounds self-explanatory, but the rest not so much yet. I guess I'm looking for the review where the biggest con is never being home as that's not one of my concerns. Would be nice to do better than making enough to live paycheck to paycheck.

I appreciate your candor.

If moving on is a certainty... probably go with Rahl anyway and then just see what's what after a year.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
I'm still learning the lingo. Reefer, Rail, etc.. tanker sounds self-explanatory, but the rest not so much yet. I guess I'm looking for the review where the biggest con is never being home as that's not one of my concerns. Would be nice to do better than making enough to live paycheck to paycheck.

I appreciate your candor.

If moving on is a certainty... probably go with Rahl anyway and then just see what's what after a year.
There are no universally loved carriers. You won't find any where the only downside is never being home.

You'll likely do better than paycheck to paycheck. Unless you're absolutely crap with your finances or get involved with people who are absolutely crap with your finances.

Your first year might not be gangbusters but it mostly depends how well you take to it.
 

Nomad1

Well-Known Member
Since you're in GA go with Kennesaw and pull a reefer. It's no worse than anything else starting out and Skateboarder hates reefers. Anything you can do to get him going is worth it.
 

Ranger_375

Well-Known Member
Knight has an Atlanta terminal. Paid CDL training, and you'll make a decent living if company dryvan or reefer is for you. Don't lease from them, don't lease onto them. Running as an employee is decent there but L/O with them you're likely to get your manhood caught in a sausage packer.
 

NewStartX

Member
Ran background and driving record on myself today. Got a ton of addresses last 40 years, but that's it. No red flags to worry about. Just studying for permit...

Formulate questions to ask... cpm after certification all or is there more?

What has the most miles generally?
 

NewStartX

Member
Reading something about owners getting 72% in line returns...what is that? Can you give an example? Just for perspective.
 
Top