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ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
You know the tooth brush was invented in Ontario. Had it been invented in Nebraska it would of been called a “teeth” brush. 🖕🏻😁🖕🏻
Well... maybe.

Toothbrush History


The first bristle toothbrush resembling the modern one was found in China. Used during the Tang Dynasty (619–907), it consisted of hog bristles.[8][9] The bristles were sourced from hogs living in Siberia and northern China because the colder temperatures provided firmer bristles. They were attached to a handle manufactured from bamboo or bone, forming a toothbrush.[4] In 1223, Japanese Zen master Dōgen Kigen recorded on Shōbōgenzō that he saw monks in Chinaclean their teeth with brushes made of horsetail hairs attached to an oxbone handle. The bristle toothbrush spread to Europe, brought from China to Europe by travellers.[10]It was adopted in Europe during the 17th century.[11] The earliest identified use of the word toothbrush in English was in the autobiography of Anthony Wood who wrote in 1690 that he had bought a toothbrush from J. Barret.[12] Europeans found the hog bristle toothbrushes imported from China too firm and preferred softer bristle toothbrushes made from horsehair.[4] Mass-produced toothbrushes made with horse or boar bristle continued to be imported to England from China until the mid 20th century.[3]


'Indexo' finger toothbrush, New York, United States, 1901–1919. It is made entirely of rubber, which has been shaped to fit over the index finger.

A photo from 1899 showing the use of a toothbrush.
In Europe, William Addis of England is believed to have produced the first mass-produced toothbrush in 1780.[10][13] In 1770, he had been jailed for causing a riot. While in prison he decided that using a rag with sootand salt on the teeth was ineffective and could be improved. After saving a small bonefrom a meal, he drilled small holes into the bone and tied into the bone tufts of bristles that he had obtained from one of the guards, passed the tufts of bristle through the holes in the bone and sealed the holes with glue. After his release, he became wealthy after starting a business manufacturing toothbrushes. He died in 1808, bequeathing the business to his eldest son. It remained within family ownership until 1996.[14] Under the name Wisdom Toothbrushes, the company now manufactures 70 million toothbrushes per year in the UK.[15] By 1840 toothbrushes were being mass-produced in England, France, Germany, and Japan.[16] Pig bristles were used for cheaper toothbrushes and badger hair for the more expensive ones.[16]

The first patent for a toothbrush was granted to H.N. Wadsworth in 1857 (U.S.A. Patent No. 18,653) in the United States, but mass production in the United States did not start until 1885. The improved design had a bone handle with holes bored into it for the Siberian boar hair bristles. Unfortunately, animal bristle was not an ideal material as it retained bacteria, did not desiccate efficiently and the bristles were often extricated from their intended fixed insertions. In addition to bone, handles were made of wood or ivory.[17] In the United States, brushing teeth did not become routine until after World War II, when American soldiers had to clean their teeth daily.[13]
 

r3gulator3

Friendly Neighborhood Former Technician
Supporter
Well... maybe.

Toothbrush History


The first bristle toothbrush resembling the modern one was found in China. Used during the Tang Dynasty (619–907), it consisted of hog bristles.[8][9] The bristles were sourced from hogs living in Siberia and northern China because the colder temperatures provided firmer bristles. They were attached to a handle manufactured from bamboo or bone, forming a toothbrush.[4] In 1223, Japanese Zen master Dōgen Kigen recorded on Shōbōgenzō that he saw monks in Chinaclean their teeth with brushes made of horsetail hairs attached to an oxbone handle. The bristle toothbrush spread to Europe, brought from China to Europe by travellers.[10]It was adopted in Europe during the 17th century.[11] The earliest identified use of the word toothbrush in English was in the autobiography of Anthony Wood who wrote in 1690 that he had bought a toothbrush from J. Barret.[12] Europeans found the hog bristle toothbrushes imported from China too firm and preferred softer bristle toothbrushes made from horsehair.[4] Mass-produced toothbrushes made with horse or boar bristle continued to be imported to England from China until the mid 20th century.[3]


'Indexo' finger toothbrush, New York, United States, 1901–1919. It is made entirely of rubber, which has been shaped to fit over the index finger.

A photo from 1899 showing the use of a toothbrush.
In Europe, William Addis of England is believed to have produced the first mass-produced toothbrush in 1780.[10][13] In 1770, he had been jailed for causing a riot. While in prison he decided that using a rag with sootand salt on the teeth was ineffective and could be improved. After saving a small bonefrom a meal, he drilled small holes into the bone and tied into the bone tufts of bristles that he had obtained from one of the guards, passed the tufts of bristle through the holes in the bone and sealed the holes with glue. After his release, he became wealthy after starting a business manufacturing toothbrushes. He died in 1808, bequeathing the business to his eldest son. It remained within family ownership until 1996.[14] Under the name Wisdom Toothbrushes, the company now manufactures 70 million toothbrushes per year in the UK.[15] By 1840 toothbrushes were being mass-produced in England, France, Germany, and Japan.[16] Pig bristles were used for cheaper toothbrushes and badger hair for the more expensive ones.[16]

The first patent for a toothbrush was granted to H.N. Wadsworth in 1857 (U.S.A. Patent No. 18,653) in the United States, but mass production in the United States did not start until 1885. The improved design had a bone handle with holes bored into it for the Siberian boar hair bristles. Unfortunately, animal bristle was not an ideal material as it retained bacteria, did not desiccate efficiently and the bristles were often extricated from their intended fixed insertions. In addition to bone, handles were made of wood or ivory.[17] In the United States, brushing teeth did not become routine until after World War II, when American soldiers had to clean their teeth daily.[13]
I don’t actually care where it was invented. That’s what makes it a joke.
 
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