New To Trucking Realistic mileage in 11?

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
I would average around 60 MPH In a 65 MPH truck.
I would only stop at rest areas for bathroom breaks so you get in and get out and back on the road without messing around with truck stop traffic.
Keep the doors closed and try to hammer out that 11 hours in 12 hours.
Plan ahead and make the most out of those ridiculous 30 mins that you must take. Set up your coffee to brew while you take care of natures call.
60 MPHx10.5 hours driving 630 miles.
I handed in a few logs with exactly 13 hours drive time and 1300 kilometres driven, just to see what the log auditor would say
:D
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
Supporter
When it commonly gets you 2-3 extra loads a week, yeah it makes a difference.

When you can earn enough revenue in 12-13 days instead of 18-21. It makes a difference.

But all you want to do is tell us how we can't do it, while we're sitting here doing it.


And you wonder why I roll my eyes at your comments all the time.
Like I said, it's about balance. If it'll get you done early to catch another run then do it. If showing up early doesn't help, don't burn the fuel.

But again we were talking company rides. This all started because you said quit if there's a governor on the truck. I say don't worry about the governor unless the money sucks.

At the end of the day it's about what goes in the bank account, not how fast the truck is.

Similarly to the way you keep saying it's not about $/mile. It's about profits.

You keep making blanket statements as if they're absolute fact and according to you, anyone who disagrees doesn't know what they're talking about. But you're not the end all be all of how to truck. Your way doesn't apply to everyone.

I'll let you in on a little secret. Some companies give fuel bonuses. Those fuel bonuses come in the form of more per mile or in my case more per load. You save the company money at the pump and they'll literally pay you more to do the exact same thing you've been doing all along.

Meeting the fuel bonus alone equates to doing one load a week without actually doing that load.

Company driver. This is where you don't have skin in the game so you don't know what you're talking about.

I roll my eyes at you as often as you roll them at me.
 
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dchawk81

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I would average around 60 MPH In a 65 MPH truck.
I would only stop at rest areas for bathroom breaks so you get in and get out and back on the road without messing around with truck stop traffic.
Keep the doors closed and try to hammer out that 11 hours in 12 hours.
Plan ahead and make the most out of those ridiculous 30 mins that you must take. Set up your coffee to brew while you take care of natures call.
60 MPHx10.5 hours driving 630 miles.
Sounds about right. I can average 55 or better in a 60mph truck if I get more of the long routes. The longer you spend on max cruise, the better your average.

Sometimes I only have a 2 load day and it looks more OTR-ish.

My average over the entire quarter is about 46 though. Lots of 12 mile runs with 44k in the box, some 3 milers with 30k. Etc etc.
 

r3gulator3

Friendly Neighborhood Former Technician
Staff member
Supporter
In your guys experience, how many miles can a driver expect to drive in 11 hours out West? Do all of the up hills slow you down a lot, and doesn't governed trucks make it impossible to make up that time? Assuming mostly open road.
In my truck, I’m governed at 62. When I plan my trip I plan it basically at 55 mph if it’s mostly big road and 50 mph if it’s small road. If I’m mostly big road. And I don’t have long load unload times. I will typically hit 620-640 miles in a day. My best day ever all driving was 652. I had 3 minutes on my drive clock when I parked.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Just because the truck is governed at 62 doesn’t automatically make it a bad company to work for. Or that there’s one better. Just a different one.
Yes huh. Because mndriver decreed it.

You're a company driver. You don't know anything. Standing up for yourself only shows how dumb you are.

Because mndriver says so.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Drive as slow as you can, but as fast as you need to in order to get the job done.

99% of the time, for me anyway, that means drive slow. That is what works best for my operation.

I can do long loads, and run fast. Problem here is, it is much harder to get a good rate on long loads. Short loads are the money makers for me. Most don't want them, I wait it out a little bit, and I cash in on an outstanding rate for a 3-400 mile run, maybe even a 2-300 mile run if the money is good enough. Plenty 1000+ mile runs out there, but there are far too many cheap freight haulers willing to take them for rates I refuse to run for.

For a company driver, if all pay per mile and other aspects of pay are the same, then it's better to be able to run faster. That said, I will happily drive a slower truck for a company that pays me better per mile, pays better detention, pays for on duty time, and has better overall benefits.

At the end of the day, it comes down to the best pay you can get without overworking yourself.
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
Drive as slow as you can, but as fast as you need to in order to get the job done.

99% of the time, for me anyway, that means drive slow. That is what works best for my operation.

I can do long loads, and run fast. Problem here is, it is much harder to get a good rate on long loads. Short loads are the money makers for me. Most don't want them, I wait it out a little bit, and I cash in on an outstanding rate for a 3-400 mile run, maybe even a 2-300 mile run if the money is good enough. Plenty 1000+ mile runs out there, but there are far too many cheap freight haulers willing to take them for rates I refuse to run for.

For a company driver, if all pay per mile and other aspects of pay are the same, then it's better to be able to run faster. That said, I will happily drive a slower truck for a company that pays me better per mile, pays better detention, pays for on duty time, and has better overall benefits.

At the end of the day, it comes down to the best pay you can get without overworking yourself.
You’re like that lady from the movie Monsters Inc
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
I think it was dchawk81 dchawk81 that brought fuel bonuses into the conversation.
One place I worked at would give you $1,000 per quarter for achieving fuel targets. So that is $4,000 a year money to you for driving fuel efficient with ample time to complete your deliveries. That is playing long ball.
Sometimes it is not all about hammering out the miles, They also paid very well for multiple drops.
If I am still getting the miles paid and the drops and netting an extra 4 grand a year for chilling on the right pedal, I am going to do that.
Pay structure will dictate how a company driver drives!
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
I think it was dchawk81 dchawk81 that brought fuel bonuses into the conversation.
One place I worked at would give you $1,000 per quarter for achieving fuel targets. So that is $4,000 a year money to you for driving fuel efficient with ample time to complete your deliveries. That is playing long ball.
Sometimes it is not all about hammering out the miles, They also paid very well for multiple drops.
If I am still getting the miles paid and the drops and netting an extra 4 grand a year for chilling on the right pedal, I am going to do that.
Pay structure will dictate how a company driver drives!
The way I’m set up now, if I get crappy fuel mileage I get to drive faster

Win win
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I think it was dchawk81 dchawk81 that brought fuel bonuses into the conversation.
One place I worked at would give you $1,000 per quarter for achieving fuel targets. So that is $4,000 a year money to you for driving fuel efficient with ample time to complete your deliveries. That is playing long ball.
Sometimes it is not all about hammering out the miles, They also paid very well for multiple drops.
If I am still getting the miles paid and the drops and netting an extra 4 grand a year for chilling on the right pedal, I am going to do that.
Pay structure will dictate how a company driver drives!
Yup. Around here it's:

1) Don't speed
2) Don't hit stuff
3) Show up for work
4) Meet the fuel goal

And you're good for about $6,000 a year extra.

1 and 4 are as simple as using cruise as much as you can.
 

braylean

Well-Known Member
I'm set at 70 and run I-40 and I-10 quite a bit from Texas and Oklahoma to California. It's a 2 day hop and depending on which way I am traveling, one of those days will average around 670 and the other around 730 because one of those days includes California at 55 ( that's means 60 - 62 in trucker speak, lol). I-15 from California to I-70 Colorado, if I start outside California I run right at 700 as well. It's really more about construction and traffic timing for me at least. When all that construction was happening at Flagstaff and there was miles of one lane, I never broke 700, also if I hit rush hour in Albuquerque it can ruin a good day and Phoenix can ruin a good day at times as well.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
I'm set at 70 and run I-40 and I-10 quite a bit from Texas and Oklahoma to California. It's a 2 day hop and depending on which way I am traveling, one of those days will average around 670 and the other around 730 because one of those days includes California at 55 ( that's means 60 - 62 in trucker speak, lol). I-15 from California to I-70 Colorado, if I start outside California I run right at 700 as well. It's really more about construction and traffic timing for me at least. When all that construction was happening at Flagstaff and there was miles of one lane, I never broke 700, also if I hit rush hour in Albuquerque it can ruin a good day and Phoenix can ruin a good day at times as well.
You make me tired just reading this.
 
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