Radiant Fire, part deux?

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I'm mechanically inclined when I want to be. I'm aware of the pitfalls.
I'm thinking you are are not quite as aware as what you are truly getting into with something like this. that isn't a shot at you, but more the unexpected shock of what maintaining an old truck entails. Working on the truck = downtime. Downtime is far more costly than the repairs itself. This is why so many realize that a truck payment isn't really as big as they thought when they once avoided it.
 

Electric Chicken

Jock
Supporter
I'm thinking you are are not quite as aware as what you are truly getting into with something like this. that isn't a shot at you, but more the unexpected shock of what maintaining an old truck entails. Working on the truck = downtime. Downtime is far more costly than the repairs itself. This is why so many realize that a truck payment isn't really as big as they thought when they once avoided it.
Everyone here runs old trucks. It's not OTR. I'm not going to get into a pissing match about my own abilities and research.

The flip side to running old equipment is you don't have to always run so hard to pay for it, and you can afford to take the downtime.

You can still have issues with a new truck. Heck we have brand new ones in the shop all the time. But with a new truck you have the downtime and still have to make the payment. And then run extra hard to make up for it.

I get it, you like your shiny new sh*t. Not everyone needs to take that approach.

BTW that WAS a shot at me. But it's cool "old hands" act like a 38 year old adult can't think on his own just because he hasn't been at it for 20 years. I'm used to it.
 
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Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Everyone here runs old trucks. It's not OTR. I'm not going to get into a pissing match about my own abilities and research.

The flip side to running old equipment is you don't have to always run so hard to pay for it, and you can afford to take the downtime.

You can still have issues with a new truck. Heck we have brand new ones in the shop all the time. But with a new truck you have the downtime and still have to make the payment. And then run extra hard to make up for it.

I get it, you like your shiny new sh*t. Not everyone needs to take that approach.
10/4

I know the amount of money you talk about making as a company driver, and I know what you would expect to make if you bought a truck. you aren't doing this to take a pay cut.

I would assume that to take on this extra responsibility, you would want to make more.

I was only trying to speak to you from experience. You are used to working regularly and having nice things. You attempt that with a 20+ year old truck and get back to me a couple years into that venture. Just don't be one of the majority that say owning a truck is BS as you go back to driving a company rig.

Those issues you speak of turn out to easily be more costly than any level of truck payment. Make no mistake, those issues will be the rule, not the exception. You better be a diesel and overall truck mechanic, not just mechanically capable of fixing things over time.

Mechanically, an oil leak, trans leak, or axle leak can cost you in a big way. Not to fix it, but the cost for being shut down by DOT. If it is forming a drip, you are shut down. Those things wont be fixed at the weigh station, they will be towed to a shop, so plan on close to $1k there. You can tow it to your house if you like and fix it yourself, but time is money. Doesn't have to make a puddle on the ground, just has to be forming a drip to be considered a leak.

Old wiring cracks. It's brittle. the rubber is literally falling off of it due to the exposure to heat. a bump in the road can create multiple electrical problems. Many of those problems can be DOT issues. You need gauges to work for an inspection. You need sensors to work to keep you truck from dropping to 2.5 mpg because a sensor is reading wrong. Even the old trucks have basic sensors, and good luck diagnosing that with a skill set beyond "replace and hope".

A simple headlight going dim could shut you down for a couple days, after it is pointed out to you by a DOT officer and the fine that comes with that. And the points. Care to guess at the loss of revenue over something that simple? And how simple do you think it will be to fix? Might not be a headlight, could be any light on your entire rig.

Talk to people that really track their numbers and see how close having something that is less than 10 years old compares to something with a new truck payment. You might be surprised. Talk to someone that takes on a truck that is older than 10 years old and tracks their true expenses and see what they deal with.

There is a fine line between those that own trucks and make a profit worth owning a truck, and those that drive a company truck. That fine line separates people who know numbers and people who don't. Lots of people out there who work their asses off with old equipment and earn less than a company driver. Don't be one of those people.

If you think I am posting what I post because I think everyone should have a shiny new truck, then you are clueless and pay zero attention to what I have to say. Maintenance costs matter, doesn't matter if you are running an OTR truck, regional truck, or a local truck. As an owner operator, those costs become much more important because you are under a more intense microscope.

But, do what you want.
 

Hammer166

Instigateur №166™
Maybe a Candy Apple Red truck? That is the color I planned on painting my Camaro before some dumbass truck driver backed out onto the road from a fuel station while I was "not" racing at 140mph.

Mine was that Mack red, too. Didn't want a red truck, ended up loving it.
 

Electric Chicken

Jock
Supporter
10/4

I know the amount of money you talk about making as a company driver, and I know what you would expect to make if you bought a truck. you aren't doing this to take a pay cut.

I would assume that to take on this extra responsibility, you would want to make more.

I was only trying to speak to you from experience. You are used to working regularly and having nice things. You attempt that with a 20+ year old truck and get back to me a couple years into that venture. Just don't be one of the majority that say owning a truck is BS as you go back to driving a company rig.

Those issues you speak of turn out to easily be more costly than any level of truck payment. Make no mistake, those issues will be the rule, not the exception. You better be a diesel and overall truck mechanic, not just mechanically capable of fixing things over time.

Mechanically, an oil leak, trans leak, or axle leak can cost you in a big way. Not to fix it, but the cost for being shut down by DOT. If it is forming a drip, you are shut down. Those things wont be fixed at the weigh station, they will be towed to a shop, so plan on close to $1k there. You can tow it to your house if you like and fix it yourself, but time is money. Doesn't have to make a puddle on the ground, just has to be forming a drip to be considered a leak.

Old wiring cracks. It's brittle. the rubber is literally falling off of it due to the exposure to heat. a bump in the road can create multiple electrical problems. Many of those problems can be DOT issues. You need gauges to work for an inspection. You need sensors to work to keep you truck from dropping to 2.5 mpg because a sensor is reading wrong. Even the old trucks have basic sensors, and good luck diagnosing that with a skill set beyond "replace and hope".

A simple headlight going dim could shut you down for a couple days, after it is pointed out to you by a DOT officer and the fine that comes with that. And the points. Care to guess at the loss of revenue over something that simple? And how simple do you think it will be to fix? Might not be a headlight, could be any light on your entire rig.

Talk to people that really track their numbers and see how close having something that is less than 10 years old compares to something with a new truck payment. You might be surprised. Talk to someone that takes on a truck that is older than 10 years old and tracks their true expenses and see what they deal with.

There is a fine line between those that own trucks and make a profit worth owning a truck, and those that drive a company truck. That fine line separates people who know numbers and people who don't. Lots of people out there who work their asses off with old equipment and earn less than a company driver. Don't be one of those people.

If you think I am posting what I post because I think everyone should have a shiny new truck, then you are clueless and pay zero attention to what I have to say. Maintenance costs matter, doesn't matter if you are running an OTR truck, regional truck, or a local truck. As an owner operator, those costs become much more important because you are under a more intense microscope.

But, do what you want.
Tell me how perfect that glider has been.

Oh, wait.

I think we can agree there is no guarantee of 100% uptime. We can only choose where to place our odds and money; repairs vs payment. Either way, downtime screws us all.

As complex and prone to issues as new trucks are, a well maintained old one is on a pretty even keel with respect to reliability. I'm pretty sure we can all agree on that too.

Assumptions will get you every time. I'm fully expecting to take a pay cut once I have my vehicles paid off. I don't want to bust ass forever.

Schneider won't let us put in shorter days as a matter of course. So basically...I'm out.

I'm not going to say my goal is to make less money. That would be wierd. And dumb. But my goal is to slow down, work either shorter or easier days, and take what comes. If I need 3 days off for repairs, so be it.
 
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Electric Chicken

Jock
Supporter
And why would you assume I haven't talked to owner ops already?

Do you think I'm just be-bopping along 60mph, seeing trucks doing 70 and thinking "I'm gonna buy an old clapped out one and that's that!"? No research on rates, costs, repairs, reliability, etc. You think I don't observe downtime of our truck's, old and new, who's sitting along the road and who isn't?

Like I'm some kind of retard who can't actually look into sh*t? Who needs to have advice spoon fed to him from random O/Os on the internet? Seriously?

All this from casually mentioning one of many trucks I've been looking at?
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
I sit here and read the comments.

As a sign a check to trade a 2011 for a 2016 for one truck....

And sign another check for $30k+ for a major body overhaul converting a condo to a midroof on a 2007. The only way out of this truck is drive the value out.

I remember talking in-depth with Injun Injun about the cost difference between a 2007 vs a 2015.

Fiscally, there's little to none for new vs old. It was an emotional decision really.
 

Electric Chicken

Jock
Supporter
I sit here and read the comments.

As a sign a check to trade a 2011 for a 2016 for one truck....

And sign another check for $30k+ for a major body overhaul converting a condo to a midroof on a 2007. The only way out of this truck is drive the value out.

I remember talking in-depth with Injun Injun about the cost difference between a 2007 vs a 2015.

Fiscally, there's little to none for new vs old. It was an emotional decision really.
IOW it's payments vs repairs. Whichever you prefer. And I prefer repairs because if you're not running you don't need to make repairs. But that payment keeps coming due.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Tell me how perfect that glider has been.

Oh, wait.

I think we can agree there is no guarantee of 100% uptime. We can only choose where to place our odds and money; repairs vs payment. Either way, downtime screws us all.

As complex and prone to issues as new trucks are, a well maintained old one is on a pretty even keel with respect to reliability. I'm pretty sure we can all agree on that too.

Assumptions will get you every time. I'm fully expecting to take a pay cut once I have my vehicles paid off. I don't want to bust ass forever.

Schneider won't let us put in shorter days as a matter of course. So basically...I'm out.

I'm not going to say my goal is to make less money. That would be wierd. And dumb. But my goal is to slow down, work either shorter or easier days, and take what comes. If I need 3 days off for repairs, so be it.
And why would you assume I haven't talked to owner ops already?

Do you think I'm just be-bopping along 60mph, seeing trucks doing 70 and thinking "I'm gonna buy an old clapped out one and that's that!"? No research on rates, costs, repairs, reliability, etc. You think I don't observe downtime of our truck's, old and new, who's sitting along the road and who isn't?

Like I'm some kind of retard who can't actually look into sh*t? Who needs to have advice spoon fed to him from random O/Os on the internet? Seriously?

All this from casually mentioning one of many trucks I've been looking at?
You got this.

This random owner operator will not spoon feed anything further, as to not further offend you.
 

r3gulator3

FLATBED GANGSTER
Supporter
Maybe a Candy Apple Red truck? That is the color I planned on painting my Camaro before some dumbass truck driver backed out onto the road from a fuel station while I was "not" racing at 140mph.

Don’t buy a red truck.

Fun fact! Red is the most commonly spotted color for traffic violations.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
Everyone here runs old trucks. It's not OTR. I'm not going to get into a pissing match about my own abilities and research.

The flip side to running old equipment is you don't have to always run so hard to pay for it, and you can afford to take the downtime.

You can still have issues with a new truck. Heck we have brand new ones in the shop all the time. But with a new truck you have the downtime and still have to make the payment. And then run extra hard to make up for it.

I get it, you like your shiny new sh*t. Not everyone needs to take that approach.

BTW that WAS a shot at me. But it's cool "old hands" act like a 38 year old adult can't think on his own just because he hasn't been at it for 20 years. I'm used to it.
You're starting to sound like that MN dude........
 

Electric Chicken

Jock
Supporter
You got this.

This random owner operator will not spoon feed anything further, as to not further offend you.
Sounds good. I mean considering your advice is basically to take on a payment even if it's uncomfortable (if not impossible) to do so, not knowing the person you're talking to...

My neighbor has a nice big truck with a nice big payment. He cannot run the rail because of that payment.

I've got enough payments in my life, I really don't want more. Once they're done that's (hopefully) it.
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
10/4

I know the amount of money you talk about making as a company driver, and I know what you would expect to make if you bought a truck. you aren't doing this to take a pay cut.

I would assume that to take on this extra responsibility, you would want to make more.

I was only trying to speak to you from experience. You are used to working regularly and having nice things. You attempt that with a 20+ year old truck and get back to me a couple years into that venture. Just don't be one of the majority that say owning a truck is BS as you go back to driving a company rig.

Those issues you speak of turn out to easily be more costly than any level of truck payment. Make no mistake, those issues will be the rule, not the exception. You better be a diesel and overall truck mechanic, not just mechanically capable of fixing things over time.

Mechanically, an oil leak, trans leak, or axle leak can cost you in a big way. Not to fix it, but the cost for being shut down by DOT. If it is forming a drip, you are shut down. Those things wont be fixed at the weigh station, they will be towed to a shop, so plan on close to $1k there. You can tow it to your house if you like and fix it yourself, but time is money. Doesn't have to make a puddle on the ground, just has to be forming a drip to be considered a leak.

Old wiring cracks. It's brittle. the rubber is literally falling off of it due to the exposure to heat. a bump in the road can create multiple electrical problems. Many of those problems can be DOT issues. You need gauges to work for an inspection. You need sensors to work to keep you truck from dropping to 2.5 mpg because a sensor is reading wrong. Even the old trucks have basic sensors, and good luck diagnosing that with a skill set beyond "replace and hope".

A simple headlight going dim could shut you down for a couple days, after it is pointed out to you by a DOT officer and the fine that comes with that. And the points. Care to guess at the loss of revenue over something that simple? And how simple do you think it will be to fix? Might not be a headlight, could be any light on your entire rig.

Talk to people that really track their numbers and see how close having something that is less than 10 years old compares to something with a new truck payment. You might be surprised. Talk to someone that takes on a truck that is older than 10 years old and tracks their true expenses and see what they deal with.

There is a fine line between those that own trucks and make a profit worth owning a truck, and those that drive a company truck. That fine line separates people who know numbers and people who don't. Lots of people out there who work their asses off with old equipment and earn less than a company driver. Don't be one of those people.

If you think I am posting what I post because I think everyone should have a shiny new truck, then you are clueless and pay zero attention to what I have to say. Maintenance costs matter, doesn't matter if you are running an OTR truck, regional truck, or a local truck. As an owner operator, those costs become much more important because you are under a more intense microscope.

But, do what you want.
What do you mean DOT will shut you down for oil leaks or headlights dim or other issues?
 

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