Probability basis for prepping

GAnthony

The Eldest Member
Supporter
I'll be the first to admit it. The zombie shows got me going at times. I bought a few expensive items I felt I needed in case it happened. But it can be fun.
i was seriously considering a shotgun....when i was younger, i read gun magazines that said the mossberg pump action was the best (back then)

what are some gun officinados saying is the best shotgun nowadays, in the 12 gauge ammo..???
 

BigRedFromTexas

Well-Known Member
i was seriously considering a shotgun....when i was younger, i read gun magazines that said the mossberg pump action was the best (back then)

what are some gun officinados saying is the best shotgun nowadays, in the 12 gauge ammo..???
Mossberg 500 was my secondary weapon back in the day. It had a pistol grip and looked like a sawed off shotgun. It sure scared the detainees when they saw it. I love the pump action effect. It makes everyone aware.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
And use mechanical connections as opposed to soldered connections.
Depends on the kind of current the ground might be expected to carry. A low current ground could be soldered. OTOH, if the cage was being used to shield equipment from a lightning strike, it would have to be mechanical to withstand the heat... a soldered connection would melt.
 

Fageol

Old acid hauler but not too caustic
Dude, we are way passed that. Where have you been? :oops:
Hospital then home and back to the Elmendorf Air Force Base Hospital tomorrow at 10 am.
Did I read that right? Your buddy with a PHD in statistics moved to the Ukraine to avoid prepping?
Is he good at his job? What odds did he place on Russia annexing the Ukraine's Crimea?
I would say that prepping was expedited in Ukraine years before Alaska.
Depends on the kind of current the ground might be expected to carry. A low current ground could be soldered. OTOH, if the cage was being used to shield equipment from a lightning strike, it would have to be mechanical to withstand the heat... a soldered connection would melt.
I was under the impression that big currents were needed to screw up the SCADA and like systems that were mentioned in this thread. Thus I posted the comment about mechanical grounds (it's a question on the technician class ham license) for the very reason that you cite.
 

Ranger_375

Well-Known Member
Hospital then home and back to the Elmendorf Air Force Base Hospital tomorrow at 10 am.



I was under the impression that big currents were needed to screw up the SCADA and like systems that were mentioned in this thread. Thus I posted the comment about mechanical grounds (it's a question on the technician class ham license) for the very reason that you cite.
First of all, get healthy cheechako ;) lol

Second... you're right about mechanical vs soldered. Repeated use, or heavy current will weaken or cause soldered grounds to fail. SCADA may/may not (generally not) be adequately shielded to protect it. I know some SCADA that really wasn't shielded everywhere it should be... it's over on that thing that crosses the tanana and goes under/around the richardson...
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
Hospital then home and back to the Elmendorf Air Force Base Hospital tomorrow at 10 am.



I was under the impression that big currents were needed to screw up the SCADA and like systems that were mentioned in this thread. Thus I posted the comment about mechanical grounds (it's a question on the technician class ham license) for the very reason that you cite.
Faraday cages are used for RFI and EMI interference shielding primarily. Most applications don't see large currents, but need a good high frequency ground. Copper braid that's soldered is usually the ticket. In power and lightning shielding applications, that wouldn't come close to surviving a serious event.
 

Fageol

Old acid hauler but not too caustic
First of all, get healthy cheechako ;) lol

Ain't that a Volvo in your avatar? Ain't there a sign down by Tok immediately to the right of the northbound lane where in large letters any half-sleepy skinner can see, "NO VOLVOs!"? I even think that got a turnaround area nearby. How many Volvos do you see up here? Maybe 3? Carlile has one and I think that produce lash-up has one and I used to see a raggedy whitish one occasionally at Nelson's fuel station. But that's about it. Alaska is darn near Volvo free. I have yet to see one in front of a b-train full of boards out of BC up here.

Construction Machinery, the Mack/Volvo/Hitachi/and a bunch of other stuff dealer gave one of those 3-axle Volvack (pardon the portmanteau) diarrhea-drive tractors to Sourdough Anchorage for testing while I was there. It didn't have the snot to run doubles so was used around town. I think it lasted about a week; then the hate got to it and back to CMI it went.

My fellow readers that avatar Volvo pic is proof positive that this Ranger 3 six-bits guy is running coyote. Don't say I didn't warn you! Rangler Three Six-Bits, R U sure you're qualified to call anybody a "cheechako"? By the way, after the deaths of her parents, Jeanne renamed the old Chee on Fireweed, "Riley's." But it's still the same great old joint and has kept the same old "patrons" while adding new ones.
 

phoenix827

Well-Known Member
Just to stir the pot, I have been told repeatedly that a faraday cage does NOT need to be grounded. It is just a shield. Look at the anti static bags computer components come in, they are nothing more than small faraday cages. They are never grounded to anything. However, mine sits on the ground anyways. (Metal garbage can) Either way, whatever is inside has to be insulated from any contact with the actual shielding material. Nothing fancy, I lined my can with cardboard.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
Just to stir the pot, I have been told repeatedly that a faraday cage does NOT need to be grounded. It is just a shield. Look at the anti static bags computer components come in, they are nothing more than small faraday cages. They are never grounded to anything. However, mine sits on the ground anyways. (Metal garbage can) Either way, whatever is inside has to be insulated from any contact with the actual shielding material. Nothing fancy, I lined my can with cardboard.
They need to be grounded. You ever take a product through RFI/EMI shielding qualification? Without grounding, the induced currents have nowhere to go. A lightning strike provides the best example - without grounding, the strike may induce secondary surges, depending on the ability to breakdown potential air gaps to the shielded equipment.
 

phoenix827

Well-Known Member
Right, but an EMP is not lightning, that is more voltage and amp driven. An emp is more of a very high frequency static shock. (And yes. I know lightning is sort of static as well.) That was why I made the point about the anti static bags. They are not grounded because they deflect more than channel. If you are working on a computer you wear an anti static wire to channel any charge rather than deflect it. I dont pretend to understand the science behind it, but that is how it was explained to me and it makes sense. :) Basicly they are just vastly different electrical charges.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
Right, but an EMP is not lightning, that is more voltage and amp driven. An emp is more of a very high frequency static shock. (And yes. I know lightning is sort of static as well.) That was why I made the point about the anti static bags. They are not grounded because they deflect more than channel. If you are working on a computer you wear an anti static wire to channel any charge rather than deflect it. I dont pretend to understand the science behind it, but that is how it was explained to me and it makes sense. :) Basicly they are just vastly different electrical charges.
It was explained wrong. You wear an antistatic wrist strap precisely because your computer is grounded through the power supply. You complete the circuit through your shoes when you discharge static through an IC chip when you touch it.

Lightning and static discharge occurs when the voltage field intensity exceeds 23,000 Volts/meter - the potential that will breakdown the dielectric capacity of an air gap. Once broken down the resistance and voltage approach zero, and the strike is purely current driven until the electric charge difference across the gap is depleted enough to reestablish the dielectric barrier.

EMI/RFI is more a case of field coupling - circuit crosstalk between your CB and ignition circuits being a good example. Shielding the conductor alleviates the crosstalk, but the shield must be grounded without completing a current loop to be effective.
 
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