Planning to become an owner operator.

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
#41
Yeap, but got a true story: A farmer and his family wanted to payoff the new combine they had purchased. He said to his wife and kids, with 3 good years of God's grace, and good weather we can pay off that combine. They ate peanut butter sandwiches and milk, the whole family for 3 whole years. On the end of the 3rd year, that combine was paided in full. The family never ate another peanut butter sandwich after that for the rest of their time...The story is true, too truly prosper. Their must be a great sacrifice by someone or some family, in order to jump ahead and live the American dream.
Calling BS on that one. I know I'm physically ill from just two weeks of peanut butter sandwiches and I love peanut butter. No way in hell can anyone live off just that for 3 years.
 

derekcook13

Well-Known Member
#42
in an earlier posting, i think you said something like, you're going to live on $27,000 for the time you are restoring that truck?

i think in short time, most of that money will be gone, and back to work you go.

since i am not sure what type of resto job you're going to do, a full on factory, or resto/mod, either way, the parts alone will eat into your tiny cash reserves.

if it were me, i'd do the resto on the weekends and vacation times. not too many restoration jobs (from professionals i have seen on the Velocity Channel), complete a resto or resto/mod in under 1 year, some take over 2 years. there is always time wasted waiting for parts to arrive, shopping for those parts, and maybe fabricating parts as well.

i wish you all the best in your resto project, but i'd seriously reconsider quitting your job as well.
Yeap: that's truth, thank you. I'll have to, be quit, because my job eats up weeks, weekends, turn into month's and nothing gets done. The truck is in fairly good condition, there several big steps I've never done, like rebuilding twin screws, never rebuilt a diesel engine before, the fifth wheel and so on. But when I start, I want a almost new, paid off piece of equipment. Once I get the truck appraised, I might take out a loan to start running the truck. That savings will be gone, I am a really mizer with money. I'll make it last, that money will be for parts, living, paint, everything. It will be a challenge to stretch that small amount. 27,000.00 isn't really that much.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
#43
If you restored a car, then you have all you need for knowledge to do your truck. Diesel engines have half the parts of a gasser, and the semi engines are twice as easy as a pick up truck diesel to rebuild. Your going to laugh when you see how easy it is. My first diesel engine was a powerstroke in an f350. Probably the most complicated diesel built. I was scared, but laughed when I was done. So easy. Semi will be much easier. Don't even need o pull the motor out for a basic re sleeve . Id pull it though, do the full build, get it all painted up nice. I always look for upgraded parts too. They tend to cost about the same , but perform much better and last longer. The stock powerstroke I built was rated to a max of 600 hp. When I was done it was rated at 3500 hp. So theres lots to improve on most older motors. The semi engines are the same. Just easier to work on.
3500 horsepower. Yeah okay. 😂🤤
 

derekcook13

Well-Known Member
#44
Calling BS on that one. I know I'm physically ill from just two weeks of peanut butter sandwiches and I love peanut butter. No way in hell can anyone live off just that for 3 years.
Yeap, believe it or not! The man that told me that story. Was know for telling the truth. Now of course I was young, and haven't relayed that story for years. But I just know, the piece of equipment was paided off. Remembering every detail, ya might have me. But I know it was a sacifice.
 

(((ME)))

Well-Known Member
#45
Calling BS on that one. I know I'm physically ill from just two weeks of peanut butter sandwiches and I love peanut butter. No way in hell can anyone live off just that for 3 years.
If you want good health and happy mind...You just don't cut a deep money hole in food department. A doctors visit can turn into problems from lack of good healthy foods.
 

derekcook13

Well-Known Member
#46
I tell ya w
If you want good health and happy mind...You just don't cut a deep money hole in food department. A doctors visit can turn into problems from lack of good healthy foods.
Lots of supplements. Protein powder, little high but I can stretch it. Eggs and so on. Yeap.
 

Silverwolf

Well-Known Member
#47
3500 horsepower. Yeah okay. 😂🤤
Learn to read, that's the rating, not the hp. DUH! Meaning, stock blows up at 600hp, mine at 3500hp which is not achievable. IT actually make 1100hp, but I don't mean to brag. That said, the new powerstroke will make 1000hp, with a tune, no after market parts. Proving new technology far surpasses old. I spent a lot of coin to get that out of my older diesel, my turbo is bigger than your rigs turbo. (65lbs boost) hahaha.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
#48
Learn to read, that's the rating, not the hp. DUH! Meaning, stock blows up at 600hp, mine at 3500hp which is not achievable. IT actually make 1100hp, but I don't mean to brag. That said, the new powerstroke will make 1000hp, with a tune, no after market parts. Proving new technology far surpasses old. I spent a lot of coin to get that out of my older diesel, my turbo is bigger than your rigs turbo. (65lbs boost) hahaha.
Oh I thought you meant rating as in Dyno results.
 

Silverwolf

Well-Known Member
#49
Oh I thought you meant rating as in Dyno results.
Actually, to get that rating you do need to dino it, and blue print it. The print part is the crappy part. Takes for ever to enter all the info, measurments, parts etc. Part of that process is the balancing, which isn't really required on a diesel. They are low rpm motors and don't benefit much from balancing, nor is it cost effective with no results. I did it because I had a goal to achieve, and needed it balanced to achieve that hp and torque. As well as other things like machining pistons and ceramic coating the pistons so they won't melt at 1400 degrees. Lol. The rating is based on the parts that can fail. If they are rated to 3500hp, then that's the rating your motor gets. Not that you can make that much, but the motor could take it.
 

derekcook13

Well-Known Member
#51
If you restored a car, then you have all you need for knowledge to do your truck. Diesel engines have half the parts of a gasser, and the semi engines are twice as easy as a pick up truck diesel to rebuild. Your going to laugh when you see how easy it is. My first diesel engine was a powerstroke in an f350. Probably the most complicated diesel built. I was scared, but laughed when I was done. So easy. Semi will be much easier. Don't even need o pull the motor out for a basic re sleeve . Id pull it though, do the full build, get it all painted up nice. I always look for upgraded parts too. They tend to cost about the same , but perform much better and last longer. The stock powerstroke I built was rated to a max of 600 hp. When I was done it was rated at 3500 hp. So theres lots to improve on most older motors. The semi engines are the same. Just easier to work on.
Until I get the rebuild book for the Cummins BC3 my knowledge is very limited. Thank you very much for the vote of confidence. It's nice to know somebody has hands on experience. I have in my life time rebuilt several decent street engines. They weren't super high horse power, but they ran well.
 

derekcook13

Well-Known Member
#52
Hay, I got some general diesel rebuild questions? Plus I seen these high dollar rebuild shops. Selling these finished diesel engines. I thought what are these boy's doing to charge so much? Here's a few, please add on! Plus my question: 1. Machine balance rods and pistions: 2.micro bore and polish crank oil channels: That's a start.....Now my questions, hope I don't sound too stupid... In the head rebuild, I think you can buy stiffer valve springs. If you can't, could you marry 2 stock springs together? Here's the why? When I hit that 3 stage, I want that truck almost coming to a rolling stop down grade, and I think more pressure with the valve springs has alot to do with it: haven't done enough homework yet. End
 

Silverwolf

Well-Known Member
#53
High dollar rebuild shops, if lagit, are charging more because of the attention to detail they apply, as in closer tolerances, usually superior parts, and the equipment used to work those parts. I consulted a lot of pros on a diesel web site to learn some tricks and upgrades. The micro bore is basically a fine polish job, and should be done anyway. The oil channels are one of the tricks of the trade learned over time, and help deal with oil starvation. There are others like opening up oil galleries, and porting them if you will, to increase oil flow. Valve springs can be bought in different grades, but if not, you can not double them up. You can shim them, lots of different thicknesses. But in general , springs aren't really vehicle specific and come in thousands of configurations. Keep in mind a tighter spring is more load on the cam, and cam wear will increase, even with a tougher cam. Cam bearings should be channeled as well, and on a complete build you should line hone the cam and crank. The balancing is cheap. Basically everything piston to crank is weighed and matched to achieve as close to equal weight for each cylinder, as possible. High dollar shops will machine those parts to make them match exactly. Never the less, its a cheap upgrade to factory, and will help with vibration, but that's about it. Not much rpm gain on a balanced diesel. Before you stock guys freak out, factory does balance, but they don't machine to exact tolerance like high dollar build. Injectors will be were most of your big upgrades can be made. The options are endless there.
 

derekcook13

Well-Known Member
#54
High dollar rebuild shops, if lagit, are charging more because of the attention to detail they apply, as in closer tolerances, usually superior parts, and the equipment used to work those parts. I consulted a lot of pros on a diesel web site to learn some tricks and upgrades. The micro bore is basically a fine polish job, and should be done anyway. The oil channels are one of the tricks of the trade learned over time, and help deal with oil starvation. There are others like opening up oil galleries, and porting them if you will, to increase oil flow. Valve springs can be bought in different grades, but if not, you can not double them up. You can shim them, lots of different thicknesses. But in general , springs aren't really vehicle specific and come in thousands of configurations. Keep in mind a tighter spring is more load on the cam, and cam wear will increase, even with a tougher cam. Cam bearings should be channeled as well, and on a complete build you should line hone the cam and crank. The balancing is cheap. Basically everything piston to crank is weighed and matched to achieve as close to equal weight for each cylinder, as possible. High dollar shops will machine those parts to make them match exactly. Never the less, its a cheap upgrade to factory, and will help with vibration, but that's about it. Not much rpm gain on a balanced diesel. Before you stock guys freak out, factory does balance, but they don't machine to exact tolerance like high dollar build. Injectors will be were most of your big upgrades can be made. The options are endless there.
So, so very cool, very informative need every bit of It! Your speaking my language.Thank you.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
#55
And most injector shops don't have the correct machinery to flow and set the specs for a set of injectors like the old mechanical ones. Most just have you tweek the ecm to over voltage the solenoid
 
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derekcook13

Well-Known Member
#56
The only other question that I have is, I was reading about decking the block and heads. The writer said when cutting the surface it must be like factory suface spec's so there isn't any blow by on the gasket. I found that interesting because 1. I never thought of it, and 2. I never had it done on my rebuilds. There is so much too know. I'm studying twin turbo applications for my year and make of Cummins. I read that the actual torque produced was less then a single turbo, I don't know the details on the study or test. O' you mentioned injection. I have little knowledge as of now on the pump, but the writer suggested a 1" inlet from the tank. Special fittings and so on. Thanks that's all. Derek
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
#57
Liner protrusion is part of the entire decking procedure. Cutting the counter bore even more part of that. So "decking" is just a small portion.

I'm still trying to figure out where these 3500 HP engine are in the trucking world.
 

braylean

Well-Known Member
#59
Liner protrusion is part of the entire decking procedure. Cutting the counter bore even more part of that. So "decking" is just a small portion.

I'm still trying to figure out where these 3500 HP engine are in the trucking world.
On frac pumps being pulled by trucks, lol. And maybe the occasional ferry hauling trucks, but I doubt it. Actually I know frac pump engines go up as high as 2500 hp, I've not seen one at 3500 hp. Those engines dwarf truck engines though. Can't really think of an application for an engine of that size except maybe a custom built on site dragline our in the shipping industry. I know some tugs have enormous engines.