Pit Bulls

ridermark

home town driver
#81
Sorry you lost your dog.Animals are like part of the family.
preciate the flowers patriciaJ:yippee2:
yes he was like family. my wife pat thought I was the one hurt, only to find out I cut my dog in half. had me down for weeks. when I drank beer, he drank beer. he had his own cup too............:drunk2:
 

patriciajnsn

Steering Wheel Holder
#82
preciate the flowers patriciaJ:yippee2:
yes he was like family. my wife pat thought I was the one hurt, only to find out I cut my dog in half. had me down for weeks. when I drank beer, he drank beer. he had his own cup too............:drunk2:
That's neat your dog had his own cup.Did ya ever get another dog? My dog tiny runs the house.She's the boss.LOL
 

rebel

Well known, by a few
Supporter
#83
I think another thing is that if you get a hold of a dog that is very young, your chances of establishing dominance over the dog is much better than say, an adult dog with strong personality.

A brother of mine had a rotty that was without a doubt the most disciplined dog I have ever seen. To this day, he has rules he follows about dogs that he never ever strays (ha ha, I made a pun) from. #1 is no people food ever. #2 is that he never hits an animal, as he believes it only creates resentment in the animal. I disagree with his 2nd rule, as it gives too much credit to the intelligence of the dog.

Anyway, my brother could be across a busy street, and use one hand signal to make the dog sit, then another to lay, without ever issuing a verbal command. Of course, he had trained this dog since she could open her eyes, and basically never stopped working with her, and was constantly reinforcing what he had taught. So, again, I think if you get a dog very young, you'll have a much better chance of being boss.
Your friend is absolutely right. And raising from a pup does make a difference - it's easier.
I trained mine with food, nothing physical.
She chewed op a bic pen on a white carpet along with the house plant. Partly my fault for leaving her home alone - about 5 or 6 months old.
I put everything in her food dish and it sat for three days. Every time I went to the kitchen, she'd look up at me as if to say, "Well?". And I'd point to the dish and she skulked out.
3 days won't hurt (probably more like 2 when I gave in to those eyes).
Never happened again.
Mine behaved like your bud's.
One mishap in ten years. My room mate's psycho girl friend moved in and started giving her people food and other no no's.
One day while giving her (the dog) a pill, I dropped a couple in her dish.
No problem, I reached down to get them out and Lexxus snarled and snapped at me!
Only time she ever caught a closed fist.
The next day I saw this psycho ***** put down her food bowl and snatch it back several times while the dog snapped and snarled.
I thought I was gonna close fist her!
I actually apologized to my dog.
After nearly burning the house down, my buddy finally put the psycho to the curb.
So, never let anyone else feed them and watch what people do. It'll spoli your training.
 

Tn. Truckers Wife

Well-Known Member
Supporter
#84
I use to own a pit dobie cross. He was a very good protector, but never attacked or hurt any one unless provoked. He saved me a few times in the swamps of Florida. Unfortunately I ran over him with my bush hog. when I couldn't stop in time. He jumped a rabbit and ran it in front of me. He was a huntin dog of sorts. Would rather jump a deer than a hog. He didn't appreciate uniforms. ya know 5-O
preciate the flowers patriciaJ:yippee2:
yes he was like family. my wife pat thought I was the one hurt, only to find out I cut my dog in half. had me down for weeks. when I drank beer, he drank beer. he had his own cup too............:drunk2:
OMGosh, that's one of the worst stories I have ever heard...Soooooo sorry to hear that..I'm sure you were absolutely devistated......
 

Sinister

Order of The Gilded Flip Flop
Staff member
Supporter
#85
I#2 is that he never hits an animal, as he believes it only creates resentment in the animal. I disagree with his 2nd rule, as it gives too much credit to the intelligence of the dog.
I just realized how easily this could be misinterpreted. What I meant to say was that I disagree with my brother's idea that resentment is a possible concept within a dog, and not that I support physically abusing dogs to train them.

Duh me.
 

rebel

Well known, by a few
Supporter
#86
I just realized how easily this could be misinterpreted. What I meant to say was that I disagree with my brother's idea that resentment is a possible concept within a dog, and not that I support physically abusing dogs to train them.

Duh me.
Always good to clarify.
This is kinda like the myths abot dreams thread,lol.
Ive heard countless times from "experts" that dogs (or most animals fo that matter) don't have capacity for this or that.
And most owners will disagree.
I'll offer at least some debatable proof.
I and others have had dogs that had abusive owners. They all had different triggers.
Maybe it was a man's voice, picking up a shoe or a stick, a chain or something else and that dog would either cower or turn downright mean until you stopped whatever it was that set them off. They had to be remembering something and it wasn't nice.
Another myth.
Dogs don't understand language. They react to tone of voice or body signals.
I say BS.
My best friend growing up had a Chow named Bruno. Both his parents were from Germany. That dog could take commands in either English or German - at will.
I'll bet others here from the military or police will back that up if they've had German Shepherds from Germany.
 

2xR

******* Derelict *******
Supporter
#87
All of this talk, and, no one has volunteered to house break Cerberus. Oh well, many have tried.

I was raised around dogs, most of them well behaved and fun companions. The general consensus was that if a dog didn't have the mind set that you could, and would, take it's life, then, the dog ruled. The choker chain was the tool of choice because when you take the ability to breathe away the dog quickly understands, and, remembers, this big azzed critter might kill me.

Couple the choker chain with positive reinforcement of good behaviour, and, soon you have a model doggie.

Be careful which dogs you try to "Out Alpha"...
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