Pit bull saves woman from oncoming train.

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#41
Early signs of a dog thinking it's "alpha" over a child is mounting from the rear or deep, almost inaudible growling, baring teeth, etc. That crap needs to be corrected immediately. ("Mounting", even a female dog will do this, and neutered males will too. It's not always because it's horny. It's a dominance thing.)
Another sign is the dog trying to put his paw on top of you somewhere, even if it is just on top of your foot.

and no matter how well you establish dominance, a true alpha dog will still test you from time to time.
 

Duck

Quack
Supporter
#42

Cerberus

In God We Trust
#43
A two finger slap on top of the nose is all it takes. Not the nose itself. Go for the area between the nose and the eyes. It should make a little "hollow" sound. With two fingers, it's pretty hard to actually hurt the dog that way. But they don't like it because it's sort of degrading.

About the dominance thing, .. dogs need to know that even the small children are above them in the pecking order.

You have to watch the dog CLOSELY when he's first introduced to children and any signs of dominance AT ALL, need to be corrected with a growl or a bark, or a two-finger nose slap, IMMEDIATELY because they have a short attention span and wont' know what they did wrong if you don't react immediately.

When the dog is curious about a child, but keeps looking back and forth between you and the child, it's good because he's learning that he can't do anything that you disapprove of.

Early signs of a dog thinking it's "alpha" over a child is mounting from the rear or deep, almost inaudible growling, baring teeth, etc. That crap needs to be corrected immediately. ("Mounting", even a female dog will do this, and neutered males will too. It's not always because it's horny. It's a dominance thing.)
Buster, i gues the easiest way to say it, is he is a rescue dog. He has issues and aggressions and i'll list them and try to explain the best i can.

Food aggressive: not with people but with other animals. tried to socialize him when i first got him. he did play good with other dogs at first. when the boxer sniffed his food bowl, Buster went ape **** and attacked him. and that was him at 6 months of age. reason he has food aggression is he always had to fight to get a bite to eat and more times then not his own mother would take a chunk out of his face. so to remedy the solution, no other dog in the house. thats simple.

He does not like men. reason: he was beaten, and i dont mean beat like you beat a dog but beaten like you beat a man down. he has never gotten over that and shows real aggression towards black men because of it. white/mexican he will just growl and if they keep coming then he will try to go thru the window after them.

Children: don't trust him around kids an will not let kids anywhere near him. not completly sure and dont want to find out the hard way. He used to like kids and was just curious. actually a little girl kissed him on his nose, a complete stranger, whne i was walking down the street with him. after that, kids next door started teasing him and spraying water at him thru the fence. now he goes crazy when there are kids around.

Now with all that said, do i trust him? completly, no. But enough to know him and his temperment that i know for a fact he will never get stupid when i'm around. and when i'm not around, he is very protective of the momma. he has just about gone thru the glass window twice and that was because of the pizza man and mail man. he doesnt want the bills either. I run this roost, its my rules and he knows it. hes hard headed but what pit isnt.

why do i keep him? he's a great dog, dont have to worry about anybody walking into the house. and i do know because of his size and weight and ungodly jaw pressure, he would fall into the wrong hands.

He had a rough start before i got him. Ive done alot of work with him to get him where he is now. now he is happy and will live a long happy life.
 

Cerberus

In God We Trust
#44
Another sign is the dog trying to put his paw on top of you somewhere, even if it is just on top of your foot.

and no matter how well you establish dominance, a true alpha dog will still test you from time to time.
Buster tries on occassions. i just push him down on his side and hold him for a sec and tell him dont be stupid.
 

Cerberus

In God We Trust
#45
I bet if he wasn't a rich NASCAR driver, there never would have been a lawsuit.
funny you say that, in the original article he did say if he had a million dollars he wouldnt be going thru all this. seems hes got some serious financial issues before this and evidentily he is broke, or so he says. wish i could find the original article.
 

Duck

Quack
Supporter
#46
Another sign is the dog trying to put his paw on top of you somewhere, even if it is just on top of your foot.

and no matter how well you establish dominance, a true alpha dog will still test you from time to time.
Sometimes, but not always.

If you're sitting down and the dog jumps up and stands with his rears on the floor and his front paws on your lap, it's not aggression. He's just using your lap as something to prop himself up with because he's trying to get closer to your face because he wants attention.

When playing around with a dog though, and he does that thing where he tries putting a single paw on you, grab the paw and hold on to it. When he tries to pull his paw away, hold onto it a little tighter and make him actually have to struggle a little to get his paw back. Eventually they'll quit doing that.
 

RACEFAN

Space Truckin
Supporter
#47
I can't speak of pits, cuz I have never owned one. My sister did,(Serena) and she was the sweetest thing. Played with her lil kids with no problems ever. I gotta say that I was worried that something might happen, but never did. As for me, I had Rotties. My boy "Onyx" was the biggest teddy bear ever. I tought him well from the get go. I was there the day he was born, and he died in my arms. When he was a pup, I would get him all fiesty and stuff, then pull my hands away and put my face in front of his. When he would go to nip at my face, I gave him a little swat on the head (not hitting, just enough to get his attention) and say "no". Sure, he nicked me a few times at first, but he was just a pup and no damage occurred. Soon, every time I did that he would just lick the heck out of me. Even when he got older and bigger (200 lbs) I would wrestle and play rough with him, but as soon as I would pull my hands away and put my face close to him he would instantly mellow and lick the heck out my face. He was a good dog. "Zeus" was a little more of a handfull. We didn't get him till he was 6 mos., and never did have the time to properly train or socialize him. He would never f*** with me, but would get fiesty when I wasn't around. All I had to do was give either of them that look, and they knew to chill. One day he snipped at a neighbors kid, that was teasing him in our back yard,(I wasn't home) and after that we had to adopt him out. I didn't want to, but the wife was scared of him (which is why he wasn't mellow when I wasn't there). Anyhow, if raised properly and socialized, any dog can be a good dog. But in my opinion it has to start early.
 

RACEFAN

Space Truckin
Supporter
#49
I wouldn't say ANY dog, ...

... I don't think this one can be properly tamed.

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LOL. Smart ass! Just because Rick Moranis "thought" that was a dog, it's not. It's a demon gargoyle. Note the horns, and it only has three toes per "paw". I heard they like to eat birds, especially DUCKS because nobody can hear the echo of their screams...um... I mean quacks!!! Just tellin ya what I heard. Sweet dreams tonight.....
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rebel

Well known, by a few
Supporter
Thread starter #50
I bet if he wasn't a rich NASCAR driver, there never would have been a lawsuit.
He's not a rich NASCAR driver anymore.
His house not far from here is getting foreclosed and he's heading to jail.
Why did all this happen to him?
In a word.....................Meth.
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
#52
I have a Basenji who I trust absolutely with children. He loves kids and would never hurt one. He is not food aggressive, he does not resource guard and he is perfectly safe to have around any person.

My problem with him is animal aggression. He is nine years old and will fight any dog bigger than him, will even go out of his way to pick a fight. If another dog rushes him, he will bite the other dog. I am very careful to keep him on a leash at any time he is outside a controlled environment. Unfortunately, I cannot control the actions or inactions of other people with respect to their dogs. So many people let their dogs run off leash and then look at me like I'm a jerk when their dog gets bitten. Even after I shout several warnings to the other dog owner to call their dog back, the response I get is, "Awww...my dog just wants to play..." when the inevitable happens, suddenly I'm the asshat.

I am about at my wit's end with this dog. I have tried every technique to stop his aggressive behavior toward other animals and dogs in specific. There are dogs he gets along with, but only if carefully introduced to them. I can't walk my dog down the street in my own neighborhood because of the liability issues. He has a history, I know of his history and that makes me liable, regardless of whether the other animal is off leash. My last option with him is to muzzle him any time he goes out the front door. Or the needle.

This is where I am with him.

I love my dog. But when an animal is such a liability, options must be considered, regardless of how distasteful they may be. Part of responsible pet ownership is knowing when it's time to throw in the towel, not passing the problem on to another person by giving the animal away and making those last moments as peaceful and loving as possible.

One more incident with my dog and it will be my only option. Sometimes, it's the kindest thing.
 
#53
I had always been scared to death of Pit Bulls, after reading all the bad press about them. Then one day when Yellowbeard was walking our dog (a Rhodesian ridgeback) and I was just sitting on a log, I felt a nudge at my back. I about had a potty-accident when I looked around and this big pit was standing there staring at me. Yellowbeard and my dog were out of sight and there didn't seem to be anyone else around.
I did the only thing I could think of, I offered it a cookie. Before I knew it he had climbed up beside me on the log and was laying in my lap grinning at me. I was afraid that when I ran out of cookies, he would get cranky, but when I said "all gone" he just sighed, laid his head down and fell asleep. Some time later his "daddy" showed and scolded him for being such a mooch. His name was Hercules and they were visiting from New Mexico.
See? The rep that pit bulls get is because of all the bad press they get.
 
#54
My problem with him is animal aggression. He is nine years old and will fight any dog bigger than him, will even go out of his way to pick a fight. If another dog rushes him, he will bite the other dog. I am very careful to keep him on a leash at any time he is outside a controlled environment. Unfortunately, I cannot control the actions or inactions of other people with respect to their dogs. So many people let their dogs run off leash and then look at me like I'm a jerk when their dog gets bitten. Even after I shout several warnings to the other dog owner to call their dog back, the response I get is, "Awww...my dog just wants to play..." when the inevitable happens, suddenly I'm the asshat.

I am about at my wit's end with this dog. I have tried every technique to stop his aggressive behavior toward other animals and dogs in specific. There are dogs he gets along with, but only if carefully introduced to them. I can't walk my dog down the street in my own neighborhood because of the liability issues. He has a history, I know of his history and that makes me liable, regardless of whether the other animal is off leash. My last option with him is to muzzle him any time he goes out the front door. Or the needle.

This is where I am with him.

I love my dog. But when an animal is such a liability, options must be considered, regardless of how distasteful they may be. Part of responsible pet ownership is knowing when it's time to throw in the towel, not passing the problem on to another person by giving the animal away and making those last moments as peaceful and loving as possible.

One more incident with my dog and it will be my only option. Sometimes, it's the kindest thing.
Zoe was like this. I think it was her puppyhood. She was from a litter that was orphaned before their eyes opened. I nursed her with goat's milk, and when her eyes opened it was when I was nursing her. I think she imprinted on me as her mother. She never socialized with other dogs.

All her days she would never tolerate other dogs, no matter how big or how small. It was frustrating. I went to obedience school with her as a pup, she was very intelligent, and learned everything except to socialize with other canines. Even the instructor at the school was not successful at correcting that single character flaw.

She was that way to the day she died.

She was a few days shy of her 15th birthday. We never spent a day apart.

I still miss her.

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midwestbound

Night Owl
Supporter
#55
2 days ago I was picking my green beans from the garden and I felt hot air from a dog breathing on my face. I almost fell over when this german shepard licked my face. I am not normally scared of dogs but for that brief second before he licked me I figured I was screwed. The dog actually lives down the street and had gotten out of his yard. Now this dog is like my new best bud. He kept coming back to check on me to see what I was doing until his owner came home and put him back in the yard. At the time he came to my yard, I didn't realize who he belonged to.

I liked that show on TV where that woman has a nonprofit farm to raise and rehabilitate pitbulls and hires exconvicts who are on parole to help raise and train the dogs. She has rescued so many pitbulls from terrible situations and most of those dogs are as sweet as can be.
 
#57
I bet if he wasn't a rich NASCAR driver, there never would have been a lawsuit.
Jeremy isn't a rich NASCAR driver anymore. He failed a random drug test a couple years ago. They never would say what he failed for, but if you Google his name, the story is clear.

Meth.

Like Rebel said.

Meth.

Jeremy and his wife are also in hot water for numerous thefts from other racers in the area.

Meth.

When he flunked the random whizz quiz he denied it was anything illegal, and claimed it was over the counter cold medicine.

Meth.

The guy had the world in his hands, and now he is headed for the gutter.

Meth.
 
#59
Yeah, so I read the article someone linked to here about what dog is most likely to bite.


Which dog breed is most likely to bite?

A study, published this week in the journal Applied Animal Behaviour Science, with researchers questioning 6000 dog owners had some surprising conclusions.

The dog breed most likely to bite was not the Pit Bull, Rottweiler, or German Shepherd, but …wait for it…the Dachshund.

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And second was the Chihuahua, followed by the Jack Russell Terrier.


Known as sausage or weiner dogs, Doxies were originally bred to hunt badgers in their holes. The research, conducted at the University of Pennsylvania, found that one in five Dachshunds have bitten or tried to bite strangers or have attacked other dogs and "one in twelve have snapped at their owners."

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One of the researchers, Dr. James Serpell said that smaller breeds might be “more genetically predisposed towards aggressive behavior than larger dogs.”


Previous research into dog aggression has focused primarily on dog bite statistics, but researchers said that these are misleading since most dog bites are not reported. Furthermore, bites from small dogs are less likely to require medical attention and are almost never reported.

Growing up my folks always had Dachshunds. My kid brother (10 years younger than me) was about 3 when he crawled by the dog while she was eating dinner. She turned around and bit him on the face, tearing a hole in his nose and several in his cheek and lips.

I have been bit several times by dogs. It has been by small dogs every time but one. The one time it was a large dog it was a senile Collie with no teeth. I was a meter reader, the customer had just put out the bowl of mush for the dog, and it was on the porch by the electric meter. I stumbled up not noticing that the dog was eating, and as I reached up the check the seal on the meter the dog turned around and bit me several times on the lower leg.

The only casualty was my jeans were covered with the mush the dog had been eating.

The customer and I had a good laugh over it.
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midwestbound

Night Owl
Supporter
#60
My mom always had those tiny miniture toy poodles and those little suckers would bite like crazy and had little razor sharp teeth. Mean little buggers.
 
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