Older truck looking for a company to lease to

Gladiator0719

New Member
I am looking at purchasing a 1989 Peterbilt 379EXHD,for $18,000 total price. It has a new 444 Cummins engine, New 18 speed eaton transmission, PTO wet kit and the speedometer reads 896,000. The truck is in excellent condition inside and out, it's uncanny to find something that is almost 20 years old and looks and runs like this. The original owner is an old man and he is retiring. My question is, what companies will hire myself and my truck, based upon it's age and recent mechanical upgrades? It seems that all of the companies I keep reading about in trucking mags, require a much younger truck; 5-10 of age. The economy is slow right now, who has the luxury and what finacial institutions are willing to lend money to private citizens, when they are refusing to lend money to other banks. Our only choices are to buy used and solid equipment, maintain it and drive it until it goes tits up and can't be driven anymore. Companies are dictating terms, but in reality if we force them to except our terms, they will fold to our demands. But we have to stand united and unflinching in order to confront these tyrants. Like our forefathers did to the British back in 1775 and also 1812. And how we have done to many other monsters around the world, in order to maintain a fair and level playing field. Remember they need our trucks in order to move the loads and make money, America needs us to move the loads to keep this country strong. It's only fair that we be given more say so in this industry and not just to chauffer these loads around at these companies' leasiure.
 

GAnthony

Methuselah
Supporter
I am looking at purchasing a 1989 Peterbilt 379EXHD,for $18,000 total price. It has a new 444 Cummins engine, New 18 speed eaton transmission, PTO wet kit and the speedometer reads 896,000. The truck is in excellent condition inside and out, it's uncanny to find something that is almost 20 years old and looks and runs like this. The original owner is an old man and he is retiring. My question is, what companies will hire myself and my truck, based upon it's age and recent mechanical upgrades? It seems that all of the companies I keep reading about in trucking mags, require a much younger truck; 5-10 of age. The economy is slow right now, who has the luxury and what finacial institutions are willing to lend money to private citizens, when they are refusing to lend money to other banks. Our only choices are to buy used and solid equipment, maintain it and drive it until it goes tits up and can't be driven anymore.
ok, keep trying to find a company, maybe an LTL company



Companies are dictating terms, but in reality if we force them to except our terms, they will fold to our demands. But we have to stand united and unflinching in order to confront these tyrants. Like our forefathers did to the British back in 1775 and also 1812. And how we have done to many other monsters around the world, in order to maintain a fair and level playing field. Remember they need our trucks in order to move the loads and make money, America needs us to move the loads to keep this country strong. It's only fair that we be given more say so in this industry and not just to chauffer these loads around at these companies' leasiure.
ok, now you are talking useless physco-babble...

the company is owned by either an individual or corporation, they CAN DICTATE WHAT THEY WANT.

you ain't going to "force" anyone to bow down to you or your demands....they will gladly show you the door.....please, don't make me laugh.............(but i am laughing at you right now anyways)

and why bring the British into this, and "tyranny"...??:blah:

sorry, but you are pretty much talking useless now...........by the mere mention of the "British" and "monsters", any argument you thought you had, you lost it.

you should have just stuck to the gist of your question about who would hire you with an older truck..................

there goes 4 minutes of my life i ain't gonna get back..........
 
I am looking at purchasing a 1989 Peterbilt 379EXHD,for $18,000 total price. It has a new 444 Cummins engine, New 18 speed eaton transmission, PTO wet kit and the speedometer reads 896,000.
****Just for clarities sake, you can not say that your 444 Cummins is new. It is perhaps rebuilt, or remanufactured, but it is definitely not new. They stopped making those sometime ago.****


Based on the setup of the truck you described, I would say;

1. Dont buy THAT truck if you are looking to go over the road.
A. A typical 444 Cummins will get somewhere between 3 and 5 mpg average(I am quite sure having said that, someone is going to get butt-hurt because theirs gets better mileage....keywords there were "typically" and "average"). With the price of diesel where it is and soon to go higher, you cant afford to go trucking with that engine, unless you have some awesome fuel surcharges built in.
B. The wet kit is useless for most OTR work. It is great for pneumatics, and dumps. Someone might have a way to use it for carhaulers...not my area of competence though.
C. Hate to dash your hopes...but it will ALWAYS BE a 19 yr old truck with almost 900k miles. Things like metal fatigue from years of use are not always easily seen, and almost every part of that truck has some metal in it.

****After factoring the mileage issues that are known with that engine and its age, my guess is you could find a better truck for that application.****



2. If you are not going over the road;
A. Look for a local or regional dirt works company that can put you to work.
B. If you can afford a blower(or one is already equipped) then you have the possibility of running pneumatic trailers (hauling powdery products) so look for a local or regional transload company or dry bulk company.

***The caveat here is this...most transload and dry bulk companies run their own trucks first, plus you would need to get some experience on running blowers if you dont have it already.****



I must add this to mix, I am unsure of what experience you have driving. My guess is your experience is limited. I say that not to be mean, but a seasoned driver would have known the issues I spoke about in regard to the truck you are looking at. Also, a seasoned driver would have already known that most of the industry that handles OTR freight usually either operates or expects their O/O's to operate equipment models not older than 5 years(yes exceptions are made, but those are not usually given to new hires).

Perhaps a more financially sound approach would look for a newer model or look to hire on with a company that has a program to put you into a truck of your own. These programs(and they vary widely...yes some suck, others dont), usually put the driver in a newer model vehicle and helps them maintain profitability.

Just some thoughts, Good Luck and Best Wishes!
 

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