OK I know another who should I sign with thread.

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
D Dragonborn66

Prime - Reefer
Swift - most likely dry van

Either should be fine for starting out.

Don't listen to the troll about mega carriers. You have to start somewhere, and many find permanent homes with those large carriers.

Welcome to the forum!
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
Lots of megas have smaller specialized or dedicated departments to get fat and spoiled in after you gain some experience. Humpin' the spot market is probably what you'll do at first but then you can move into something steady. If not, by then you can drive rickety junk with Skateboard puller Skateboard puller . And better still....you'll have been around here long enough to slap him around like we all do. 😁
 

gearjammer

jammer
Staff member
Supporter
A lot of us have a habit of recommending for-profit driving schools over trucking company programs. I spent a lot of money at a driving school. We sat in a classroom a lot. A WHOLE LOT. Tried to stay awake a lot. Spent a couple of weeks driving a truck... backing and on the road. It was one-on-one, not five guys in a box. Got my CDL, went to Prime for training.

If I had gone straight to Prime, I would have saved $4500. After you get your permit, Prime matches you with a CDL instructor for 10,000 miles of individual Instruction. More if you need it. Then you get a week of squashing cones in backing practice. If you take 10,000 miles, divide it by 60mph - that's 167 hours. An accredited program is 140 hours... much of which I recall doing my best to try to stay awake.

I'm not exactly sure that my $4500 bought me anything more or better than what I could have received at Prime for free. I do recall that the Prime PSD students were a lot better at backing into a dock than I was as a bra.nd new CDL holder.

I suppose one of the conclusions is that for-profit driving schools can only provide so much for the price they charge. Prime's program is underwritten by a truck delivering freight. The student gets the first week on the truck to decide if trucking is a good choice for them - they can decide to quit the program and not owe a cent up to the end of that first set of classes and the week on the truck. At the for-profit driving school, you're on the hook for money from day one.

From my experience, I'm not sure my money got me any more value than what I could have received from this trucking company program.
to each his own, when I started out it was a written test and a chauffeurs licensee and when CDL came alone it was another written test,
but those are days long gone.
if I was starting out today, I would have had a company in mind and pay for a private school but that is me as I would not like to be obligated to a company for XXX amount of time.
as I stated everyone's situation is different
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
to each his own, when I started out it was a written test and a chauffeurs licensee and when CDL came alone it was another written test,
but those are days long gone.
if I was starting out today, I would have had a company in mind and pay for a private school but that is me as I would not like to be obligated to a company for XXX amount of time.
as I stated everyone's situation is different
1 year ain't no BFD dude. You can't get on at many small carriers without 2 years experience because of insurance requirements.
 

GAnthony

Well-Known Member
Supporter
WAS is the correct tense. I own my truck and trailer (mostly) and am leased onto a small owner operator carrier now.
oh, i can't say i recall hearing that, musta been when i was on my sabbatical for a few weeks.
 

Drifter McDuck

Well-Known Member
I say go for comfort.... some of the mega companies use temperature sensors that shut the truck off when it’s idling. I really don’t think you’ll find a big difference from one company to another on your first year earnings....some give big bonuses and smaller mileage pay, some give better mileage pay but have smaller bonuses. At the end of 12 months,you’ll come out pretty much the same. Once you’re on the road and getting some experience, you’ll have a much better idea of what kind of trucking you want to do for the long term. Talk to other drivers, watch, listen and learn. And have fun with it. Welcome to the forum.
 
A lot of us have a habit of recommending for-profit driving schools over trucking company programs. I spent a lot of money at a driving school. We sat in a classroom a lot. A WHOLE LOT. Tried to stay awake a lot. Spent a couple of weeks driving a truck... backing and on the road. It was one-on-one, not five guys in a box. Got my CDL, went to Prime for training.

If I had gone straight to Prime, I would have saved $4500. After you get your permit, Prime matches you with a CDL instructor for 10,000 miles of individual Instruction. More if you need it. Then you get a week of squashing cones in backing practice. If you take 10,000 miles, divide it by 60mph - that's 167 hours. An accredited program is 140 hours... much of which I recall doing my best to try to stay awake.

I'm not exactly sure that my $4500 bought me anything more or better than what I could have received at Prime for free. I do recall that the Prime PSD students were a lot better at backing into a dock than I was as a bra.nd new CDL holder.

I suppose one of the conclusions is that for-profit driving schools can only provide so much for the price they charge. Prime's program is underwritten by a truck delivering freight. The student gets the first week on the truck to decide if trucking is a good choice for them - they can decide to quit the program and not owe a cent up to the end of that first set of classes and the week on the truck. At the for-profit driving school, you're on the hook for money from day one.

From my experience, I'm not sure my money got me any more value than what I could have received from this trucking company program.
It's kinda like college and paying your own way vs having your parents pay it for you. Some parents use it as a means to control their child into early adulthood. Some kids say hell with that I'm going it alone because I want my freedom.

I went on my own because I wanted to have an out. Some of these companies can get abusive. You're stronger right off the bat when you already have your license in hand.

It pretty much took just one phone call and a little online research about CR England to know that wasn't the route I wanted to take...and I wasn't in the mood to shop carriers. Also, with license in hand I was able to take a local dedicated gig from day 1.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
It's kinda like college and paying your own way vs having your parents pay it for you. Some parents use it as a means to control their child into early adulthood. Some kids say hell with that I'm going it alone because I want my freedom.

I went on my own because I wanted to have an out. Some of these companies can get abusive. You're stronger right off the bat when you already have your license in hand.

It pretty much took just one phone call and a little online research about CR England to know that wasn't the route I wanted to take...and I wasn't in the mood to shop carriers. Also, with license in hand I was able to take a local dedicated gig from day 1.
In other words... they were seriously desperate!
 
In other words... they were seriously desperate!
They pretty much all are. Elite ain't really a thing. It's just their spin on "not big enough to be self insured & can't afford newbie insurance."

Schneider is desperate too. They just don't want their stuff torn up at the rail. They tried newbs once already.

Doesn't make it elite.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
They pretty much all are. Elite ain't really a thing. It's just their spin on "not big enough to be self insured & can't afford newbie insurance."

Schneider is desperate too. They just don't want their stuff torn up at the rail. They tried newbs once already.

Doesn't make it elite.
Yep... Prime has the extensive training system because they figure its easier to start them out the way they want them to run than trying to take dudes with experience, and get them to change.

Don Lacey (RIP) once related that the new guys in their first few years had a better safety record than experienced guys brought in from other carriers at 5+ years experience.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Don Lacey (RIP) once related that the new guys in their first few years had a better safety record than experienced guys brought in from other carriers at 5+ years experience
I’ve mentioned that very same thing here in the past. For some reason, folks at that experience level suddenly begin to think they have learned it all.

Kind of like a new driver in high school. They start out nervous and very cautious. It’s after they have had their license for about a year that they become confident and have the first accident.
 

RDBG

Well-Known Member
I’ve mentioned that very same thing here in the past. For some reason, folks at that experience level suddenly begin to think they have learned it all.

Kind of like a new driver in high school. They start out nervous and very cautious. It’s after they have had their license for about a year that they become confident and have the first accident.
I remember reading somewhere that they figured a new truck driver was at his most dangerous between 18 and 24 months experience. Could be why a lot of companies and insurance rackets want 2-3 years at a minimum and some even ask for 3-5.
 
One of the DBLs told me during an argument one time that I'm so careful that I'm likely to have a huge accident.

Not sure how that computes...but alright.

I think he was just mad?
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
I’ve mentioned that very same thing here in the past. For some reason, folks at that experience level suddenly begin to think they have learned it all.

Kind of like a new driver in high school. They start out nervous and very cautious. It’s after they have had their license for about a year that they become confident and have the first accident.
I don't know about all of that. I know I tore up some **** when I was new and I have seen some trainees that where cut loose tear up a bunch of stuff.

I was at a Landstar Ranger political re-education class where they said new hires, regardless of experience where more likely to be in an accident in the first 6 months of hire.
I think it was Markel that had a list of experience and risk of accident %. One company I worked for had that right up front for everyone to see.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
I think you're more likely to do serious damage if you've never pulled a camper, boat, skidoos, or even uhaul before.

But most rednecks have at least 7 trailers and a tow dolly in their back yard so they kind of get it.

Fairings and steps bent against a stupidly placed boulder notwithstanding.
 
Top