Truck Repair Oil filter wrenches

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
I have had this argument with people ad nauseum who don’t work with tools every day, all day. When you buy tools from Snap on, MAC, or Matco ect. You’re paying for a few things. #1 resale value of the tool, #2 comfort in your hands using them for an extended period of time, 3 the convenience of having the tool delivered directly to the shop, #4 every snap on dealer I ever did business with I could contact any time day or night and they would either bring me the tool or replace a broken tool, or if they didn’t have it, get it ordered and on its way to me any time day or night. Good luck getting that kind of service from any tool company sold in a store.
Why would I need any of that? 1) I don't intend to sell any of my tools. 2) I won't buy it if it's going to hurt me using it. 3) I'm not something prima donna grease monkey. 4) If I break a tool, that just means I get to visit a "guy store." You know how much cool stuff is in a "guy store??" Geez! Think of the enjoyment factor dude!!

:biggrin-2:

Plus there's all that other cool stuff you can buy not supporting the Snap On guy and his brood of rugrats... and enough for a 24 pack besides!

:toothpick:
 

nan

Well-Known Member
Supporter
The amount of money I'll spend on a tool is based on a frequency of use analysis. Eg. my impact guns are an IR electric and a Nitrocat air. My engine hoist is Harbor Freight. I don't have a single thing from the tool trucks.
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
I have had this argument with people ad nauseum who don’t work with tools every day, all day. When you buy tools from Snap on, MAC, or Matco ect. You’re paying for a few things. #1 resale value of the tool, #2 comfort in your hands using them for an extended period of time, 3 the convenience of having the tool delivered directly to the shop, #4 every snap on dealer I ever did business with I could contact any time day or night and they would either bring me the tool or replace a broken tool, or if they didn’t have it, get it ordered and on its way to me any time day or night. Good luck getting that kind of service from any tool company sold in a store.
Some people are clueless about buying quality tools. I’ve had some snap on stuff for 20 years now. The warranty and customer service is usually second to none. Plus like you said the quality is outstanding.
 

r3gulator3

Friendly Neighborhood Former Technician
Supporter
Why would I need any of that? 1) I don't intend to sell any of my tools. 2) I won't buy it if it's going to hurt me using it. 3) I'm not something prima donna grease monkey. 4) If I break a tool, that just means I get to visit a "guy store." You know how much cool stuff is in a "guy store??" Geez! Think of the enjoyment factor dude!!

:biggrin-2:

Plus there's all that other cool stuff you can buy not supporting the Snap On guy and his brood of rugrats... and enough for a 24 pack besides!

:toothpick:
1 no but when you die your family will. 2 technically every tool you buy can hurt you weather it’s comfortable in your hand or not. 3 no and that’s why I said you hear this argument from people who don’t use tools every day, all day long. (Paraphrasing) 4 you still need to pick up parts or lumber. So you still go to them stores.

As I said, tool trucks are designed for the guys in a shop every day. When I worked overnights I needed the convenience of a tool guy who could bring me **** at 2am. Because Lowe’s and Sears ain’t open at 2am.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
1 no but when you die your family will. 2 technically every tool you buy can hurt you weather it’s comfortable in your hand or not. 3 no and that’s why I said you hear this argument from people who don’t use tools every day, all day long. (Paraphrasing) 4 you still need to pick up parts or lumber. So you still go to them stores.

As I said, tool trucks are designed for the guys in a shop every day. When I worked overnights I needed the convenience of a tool guy who could bring me **** at 2am. Because Lowe’s and Sears ain’t open at 2am.
I'm generally not working on trucks at 2 AM...
 

tommyh

Well-Known Member
fullsize_27891.jpg
mine looks like this one here,a cheaper version of a snap on

I always tighten my oil filter hand tight with a greasy hand,but firm
a guy put mine on too tight once and it took me 2 hours to get it off,it was almost destroyed by then
 

Fageol

Old acid hauler but not too caustic
Fifty bucks for that???

:rolllaugh3:
Might be worth it if the EPA is around and you are spotted doing the Q&D removal technique (stabbing a long phillips through the spin-on filter and spinning it off). The EPA minions would surely spot the inevitable oil leaking out the holes you just made and then cause you to be fined if the used (NOT WASTE) oil lands in a place that they consider inappropriate.

I come from a cruder time (the 1960s) when many engines had socks (that was the term for an open-ended sock-like piece of fabric enclosing a screen. The "sock" was rolled up and placed in a compartment in the back of a Cummins oil pan. Removing, cleaning, and replacing them could create a fine mess.
 

tommyh

Well-Known Member
that filter wrench should last a lifetime.You can use it on many filters,and I consider it a good investment

mine is cheaper and won`t last 20 years,next time I buy one,it will be top of the line
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
The important thing is to make sure it has the canvas or nylon strap and not a rubber one. I had a rubber one first and it broke on the first stuck on filter.
That was clearly a Snap-Off tool.;)
I have a few buddies that are mechanics, one of them owns his own shop. They buy from Snap-On or MAC. they like the warranty
 
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