Oakley vs. Indian River

Thread starter #1
I am looking at going back OTR after being local for 4 years (5 years driving experience total). I've been hauling fuel for the last 2 years and enjoy pulling a tank. Live in Tampa and considering Oakley & IRT. Any advice comrades?
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
#2
I am looking at going back OTR after being local for 4 years (5 years driving experience total). I've been hauling fuel for the last 2 years and enjoy pulling a tank. Live in Tampa and considering Oakley & IRT. Any advice comrades?
I think @Mike used to drive for Oakley.
Stand by one.
 

Fageol

Old acid hauler but not too caustic
#7
I remember seeing a decent-looking Indian River rig at what looked like a delivery point not far from the Petro east of Spokane. Just checked Glassdoor. It looks like IR is looking for skinners in the Spokane area. But lots of lash-ups are looking for skinners, so I don't hold that against IR or any lash-up. I'm guessing that if IR and other lash-ups paid more they wouldn't be looking for skinners. Looks like IR was looking for team drivers. Been there done that. Might work with a wife or GF (or BF in today's world -- sorry I started trucking in 1964 or 65). I used to like to haul edibles. I assume that's IR's basic haul. Sugar, chocolate, booze, and vegetable oil pick up and delivery points were almost always interesting. It seems like so many drivers get shorted on pickup and delivery times. We used to get paid for pickups or deliveries when we went into the shipper or consignee's facility to the time we got out of it. Here's hoping that IR pays that way.
 

Sinister

Order of The Gilded Flip Flop
Staff member
Supporter
#8
In my brief time in tankers we made fun of the food grade guys.

It’s like the dry vans and flip flops of the tanker world.

I’d heard the money isn’t very good in food grade tankering.

Of course I wasn’t much on chemicals. You couldn’t pay me a bajillion dollars to do another load of methylethylbadshit or put on that damn monkey suit in 100 degrees again...
 

Fageol

Old acid hauler but not too caustic
#10
"I’d heard the money isn’t very good in food grade tankering."

Assuming Mr. Sinister's hearing is accurate, maybe we should long for the old ICC, regulated carriage, and Hoffa Senior -- from what I've heard from Local 959 hands, the Teamsters under Jimmy Junior have more bark than bite.

The ICC and regulated carriage set rates for about every commodity under the sun. I can recall that the Pacific Intermountain Tariff books were about 2-feet thick (that from my brief time as a Mitchell Brothers (the old outfit with the beautiful lease rigs) rate clerk before I quit and drove for Richfield). So trucking companies got their approximate labor cost per mile fixed. Then trucking companies Hoffa, and when Hoffa was jailed Fitz, and maybe another guy, got together and fixed most of labor costs that went into the rates published in the tariff that matched the ICC authority under which the trucker operated. The upshot was the National Master Freight Agreement and various supplements, e.g. the tanker supplement. Whether you skinned a tanker full of chocolate, a tanker full of gasoline (we didn't know 1202 from beans) or a tanker full of methylethylbadshit (is MEBS as bad as HF -- remember those calcium shots that were required to be on hand?), the pay was the same if you were union.

Here's a time card from running casual for Southern Tank lines hauling gas. Southern Tank's Martinez CA drivers were members of Teamsters 315 (Martinez). In 1974 we made about $.15/mile and $6.34/hour -- looks like I did a little better running time and mileage as opposed to straight time. Looks like delivery time took a lot longer with 3" hoses.

Southern TL had the most beautiful rigs on the road even prettier than Rocha's bull haulers. The regular drivers were assigned their own rig -- I was a firefighter in those years, casuals ran whatever was assigned and did so with extreme respect -- if a casual junked-up a truck, he no longer worked for Southern, that was the boss's rule and Red Hayes (justly famous for the number of "ranches" that he visited when he trucked into Nevada) was an absolute ruler.

The time card shows I was running 010 and 010A, a 3-axle tractor and semi. Although most STL rigs were truck and trailers that combo was the sole semi rig in Martinez -- don't know what they had in STL's much larger SoCal operation. That red Pete hauled a**; it's the only rig number I remember from those old days except Post Transportation (hauled mostly sulfuric acid) tractor 306 which hauled a**. Southern was demanding about cleaning a rig -- if you got it dirty, you washed it until it was clean but you got paid for washing it. People swore that gas coming out of STL tankers was better than that coming out of any other tanker.

Southern mostly hauled gas and diesel but occasionally hauled a load of stuff like MEK or IPA. In terms of pay, or much else, it didn't matter to the driver what he hauled, the pay was the same. (Sorry, my penmanship sucked then and I've maintained that suspect standard.)
SouthernTankTimeCard.jpg
 

Sinister

Order of The Gilded Flip Flop
Staff member
Supporter
#12
There are probably certain portions of trucking that would benefit from union involvement.

Right up until the point where it gets out of hand, as it always does.

I remember my dad saying things like, “You could haul Christmas trees, but if they put a wire around it, it was a manufactured product and a non union outfit was not allowed to touch it.”

Which of course opened he door for massive fraud and bribery at scale houses, etc.

Regarding modern food grade tankering, I went to a dairy in Coopersville, MI a few times hauling Caustic Soda. I was he only chemical tanker there. But there were TONS of food grade guys lined up to go in the building. Most of he same lined up when I scaled in, unloaded, and still there when I left.

Are they being paid for that time thatseating away your 14? How’s that work with eLogs? Does that facility provide parking when you inevitably run out your hours sitting there?

Just more things to consider.
 

Fageol

Old acid hauler but not too caustic
#13
There are probably certain portions of trucking that would benefit from union involvement.

Right up until the point where it gets out of hand, as it always does.

I remember my dad saying things like, “You could haul Christmas trees, but if they put a wire around it, it was a manufactured product and a non union outfit was not allowed to touch it.”

Which of course opened he door for massive fraud and bribery at scale houses, etc.

Regarding modern food grade tankering, I went to a dairy in Coopersville, MI a few times hauling Caustic Soda. I was he only chemical tanker there. But there were TONS of food grade guys lined up to go in the building. Most of he same lined up when I scaled in, unloaded, and still there when I left.

Are they being paid for that time thatseating away your 14? How’s that work with eLogs? Does that facility provide parking when you inevitably run out your hours sitting there?

Just more things to consider.
Regarding certain portions of the trucking industry: I think that you're right. From what I recall, the railroads wanted trucking put under the ICC because then tariffs would have to be published that would identify what was hauled and where it was hauled and who would haul it. That led to such things as what I observed. Recall that I mentioned Post Transportation, a contract carrier for then Stauffer Chemical. Post likely died with regulation and the Stauffer (sulfuric) acid plant in Martinez, CA was recently owned by the giant Solvay S.A. out of Brussels and is not in the hands of some private equity firm, Rhodia.

Post had rubber-lined trailers for HCl, HF, et al. But as noted, it didn't have general ICC authority; it had only contract authority -- whatever Stauffer made, it could haul. My old lash-up, CF, had lots of tanker authority, e.g. it could and did haul 190 proof whiskey out of N. Vancouver, B.C. to bottlers in Fresno, Sausolito, or wherever.

There was a demand for the fluoride compound for treating drinking water and maybe making toothpaste -- I'm guessing that Colgate plant in Berkeley might have produced toothpaste but I don't know. The supply came out of some plant in Trail, B.C. But the company that had trailers capable of hauling hexafluorosilicic acid, Post, could not haul the stuff as it had no authority to do so. So Post leased the authority to haul the stuff from CF. So once in a while one could see the pretty gray (Post painted its tractors with Imron so they tended to look shiny and waxed) Post 3-axle conventional KWs with various CF decorations on them.

That's how ridiculous some regulation was. Its present day analog may be those folks who buy up patents for vitally-needed medicine then boost the prices into the stratosphere.

Humans job any system that they create. That's the best reason to sunset all government agencies other than those providing safety. And they should be watched like hawks.

Regarding food grade tankering versus NaOH tankering at any location: That's an easy one. The company attorney sees that hazmat sticker and instructs management and staff to get rid of your caustic a** for fear of the EPA, OSHA (does that acronym still stand for Oh S** Here Again?), a conniving employee, visitor, or trucker, or a lurking lawyer. Let them food grade yankers rot -- little liability there.

Old style regulation unintentionally produced one benefit for the driver. Most of the tariffs had a provision for demurrage, so there was a price to pay for delay.

Don't know anything about ELD logging. It sounds like a bunch of Big Brother crap. Those who ginned it up should rot wherever.
 

RDBG

Well-Known Member
#14
In my brief time in tankers we made fun of the food grade guys.

It’s like the dry vans and flip flops of the tanker world.

I’d heard the money isn’t very good in food grade tankering.

Of course I wasn’t much on chemicals. You couldn’t pay me a bajillion dollars to do another load of methylethylbadshit or put on that damn monkey suit in 100 degrees again...
Prime does it so you may be onto something there
 

Sinister

Order of The Gilded Flip Flop
Staff member
Supporter
#15
Doesn't make much sense to me to pull any sport of smooth bore for van money. Vans are a lot more stable.

http://www.heniff.com/

This outfit is constantly trying to recruit my one friend that's still at QC, because they have a florida run that's regular.
 
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