My RM510 died! Rise of TND740

ironpony

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It finally happened. After 8 faithful years Samantha finally kicked the bucket. Probably something hateful I said while that evil ho was recalculatin'.

The Options...

Go with a 5" Garmin Diezel. I have on I got in a return to Love's. Had it up above the 510, so I've had the opportunity to compare the units operation. I've posted my thoughts here:

I haven't changed my opinion. The routing favors interstates, even to the point of going as much as 50 to 80 miles out of route. It has directed me into places that are off limits to trucks, and many of the no truck warnings are bogus. It has a nice short range navigation display for getting into the correct lane for routing changes.

It's second string at best.

TND740... Option 2, get a new RM. At MATS, RandMcNally was offering a good discount, so despite @Mike 's negative review, I got one. I got busy changing carriers this spring, so it sat in the box until th' ho died.

Out of the box: so I pulled the thing out of the box, and tried to start it. No joy. It defaulted to the engineering menu, and wouldn't boot up. A lot of people give up at this point, but being a stubborn cuss, I kept at it. No luck, but then I recalled that RM units historically have had these problems. Advice: plug the thing in and ignore it for a couple of days. The battery needs to be seasoned before it's going to run properly. It mostly has trouble booting up at this stage.

Once the battery is seasoned, press and hold the power button, until you see the blue and white RM logo. It will default to the Main Menu. Make sure you go through all of the setup menus, and enter the necessary data - especially your truck characteristics. It won't route properly without knowing your truck's height, width, GVW, etc. Make sure it's in truck mode.

WiFi Connection... you'll need to connect to WiFi as part of the setup process to register the unit, and download updates. So plan on doing this. IMO, truck stop WiFi totally sucks, so I set up a cell phone WiFi hotspot. If you're going to use the advanced features, you'll need to do this anyway. Getting the unit to connect was smooth and easy.

System Operation... if you're already familiar with an older RM GPS, the system firmware is changed only a little. The biggest change I found was the insertion of a search menu between the map page and the routing menu. The search menu is also accessed from the main menu by tapping "Destination."

Search Menu... the search menu allows you to access data about various POIs programmed into the internal database. On my 510, I could scroll the map and select an icon by tapping it. Would get basic data on what the icon represented, and program a route stop directly from the map. Very convenient. Now, you have to go to the search menu and select the POI from one of the sub menus. It's heavily weighted towards the locations neatest to you. I'm not totally happy with the structure of this menu, and would rate it as a weak spot, especially for identifying the night's parking options 400 - 600 miles further down the route. There is a Local Search function that requires WiFi for use, but it is geared to four-wheeler locations.

Route Programming Menu... to access the route programming menu, tap the Guided Search tab in the upper right hand corner of the Search Menu. This will bring up the familiar RM routing option menu.

Shortest Route vs Fastest Route... under the Tools Menu (lower left-hand corner of the Main Menu) you can access a Route tab with many options that affect how the routing algorithm works. If the routing isn't working to your liking, these options have a great effect on how the TND760 works. The fastest route option heavily weights the routing algorithm to use interstate and closed access roads. The shortest route option does just that, with no preference to closed access and secondary highways. The remaining options are self explanatory.

Waypoints... a term from aviation. Sometimes none of the built in options get it done. I can't stand paying for the Indiana/Ohio Toll Road, but there are plenty of other alternative routes that are plenty quick, and don't support foreign ownership of our critical infrastructure. My RM510 always had a bit of trouble dealing with this, so my solution was to program enough intermediate or Waypoint destinations to force the router to go where I want it to go. Simply open the Multi-Stop tab on the Route Programming Menu, select Current Trip tab. Enter as many waypoints as necessary - I use city center locations - until you get what you want.
 

Mike

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#2
Quick note on the Garmin:

The routing, as you mentioned, favors interstates because it factors in road speeds, and most importantly, your maximum driving speed. I lowered my top speed in the settings, and it immediately began calculating with this in mind, and changed the routes.
 

ironpony

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Quick note on the Garmin:

The routing, as you mentioned, favors interstates because it factors in road speeds, and most importantly, your maximum driving speed. I lowered my top speed in the settings, and it immediately began calculating with this in mind, and changed the routes.
It has the habit of putting me on streets that no big truck should ever be on, and routes that end in dead ends. Thanks, but no thanks. It's for folks who desire to end up here...

See a Stupid Wheel holder...
 
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ironpony

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Don't consider myself to be a wheel gripper, but anyway, just giving some clarification on the routing.
Couldn't get back to edit that... in a canyon. I've noticed if you get away from its routing, it will direct you to many places a big truck shouldn't be. That's bad news for a newb, and a possible reason why they get in trouble.

If I were in a situation where I needed to rely on it... an unmarked detour at night in unfamiliar country, I would not be comfortable after seeing what that thing does.
 
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