Is This the Future of Punctuation!?

kickin chicken

Batteries Not Included
Thread starter #1
On the misuse of apostrophe's (did your eye just twitch?) and our increasingly rhetorical language.

Punctuation arouses strong feelings. You have probably come across the pen-wielding vigilantes who skulk around defacing movie posters and amending handwritten signs that advertise "Rest Room's" or "Puppy's For Sale."

People fuss about punctuation not only because it clarifies meaning but also because its neglect appears to reflect wider social decline. And while the big social battles seem intractable, smaller battles over the use of the apostrophe feel like they can be won.

Yet the status of this and other cherished marks has long been precarious. The story of punctuation is one of comings and goings.

Early manuscripts had no punctuation at all, and those from the medieval period suggest haphazard innovation, with more than 30 different marks. The modern repertoire of punctuation emerged as printers in the 15th and 16th centuries strove to limit this miscellany.

Many punctuation marks are less venerable than we might imagine. Parentheses were first used around 1500, having been observed by English writers and printers in Italian books. Commas were not employed until the 16th century; in early printed books in English one sees a virgule (a slash like this /), which the comma replaced around 1520.

Is This the Future of Punctuation!? - WSJ.com
 

Sinister

Order of The Gilded Flip Flop
Staff member
Supporter
#2
My personal specialty is comma misusage.

Our language has never been perfect, and the need for clarity in terms of spelling, grammar and punctuation can be debated endlessly. What the barely literate fail to understand however, is that typingstuffall ju mbled, and goofylike thismakes it hard to read and you thought gets lost because people don't want to read what you say, because it actually takes more effort to translate it than it does to just read and understand it.

That is why it is important to spell things at least decently, and type in a manner that is clear, especially on forums and text based documents. Like it or not, if people see bad language skills, they think you're stupid right off the bat.

And I thought I read somepalce that an exclamation point coupled with a question mark meant nothing....
 

2xR

******* Derelict *******
Supporter
#3
My personal specialty is comma misusage.

Our language has never been perfect, and the need for clarity in terms of spelling, grammar and punctuation can be debated endlessly. What the barely literate fail to understand however, is that typingstuffall ju mbled, and goofylike thismakes it hard to read and you thought gets lost because people don't want to read what you say, because it actually takes more effort to translate it than it does to just read and understand it.

That is why it is important to spell things at least decently, and type in a manner that is clear, especially on forums and text based documents. Like it or not, if people see bad language skills, they think you're stupid right off the bat.

And I thought I read somepalce that an exclamation point coupled with a question mark meant nothing....
^^^^^^^^^^^ Ditto that ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I'm almost as smart as a box of rocks. The only way I can fake my way through this world is to pretend I'm smart by writing in a style that coveys brilliance.

Punctuation... satisfies my inner neat freak.
 
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