Trucking News: I gotted my CDL.......

Sinister

Supermodel
Staff member
Supporter
I've heard them on the CB a time or two.
I wrote that article “The Way People Talk On The CB” because I always noticed when two or more guys with even half assed southern accents got on the radio the accents got deeper and deeper as the conversation went on as if they were trying to outdo each other.

Always made me insane. I’m almost glad the CB is pretty dead.
 

Johndeere4020

Strong opinions are not facts MJ!!
Supporter
I always get a laugh at the inbred supertruckers who key up and say "ah din go no fancy CD ale skool. One day win aye was ten years old, muh gran-pappy just tossed me the keys to the old Corn binder twin stick 'n' sez "you scratch muh geeerz an' imma smack you seely bo-ah!"
I don’t have the inbred accent but believe it or not a lot of us started operating big trucks abf big machinery at a fairly young age. MJ’s right it isn’t hard.
 

Johndeere4020

Strong opinions are not facts MJ!!
Supporter
That's what the "mentoring" is about. CDL school is about the nuts and bolts that get a student past memorizing the pretrip, getting around the truck, slaughtering some cones and getting past the check drive.

Yup, got a CDL. Does that make him a truck driver? NO!

That period afterword, paired with an experienced truck driver is what does it. Someone who shows the new CDL holder how it should be done.

Maybe YOU didn't need that, but we all have apparently seen many who could benefit from a strong dose of mentoring!
I agree, problem is these companies take a driver that’s only been driving 6 months and make them a trainer. They don’t know the etiquette so they can’t teach it.
 

MJ1657

Bored
Supporter
That's what the "mentoring" is about. CDL school is about the nuts and bolts that get a student past memorizing the pretrip, getting around the truck, slaughtering some cones and getting past the check drive.

Yup, got a CDL. Does that make him a truck driver? NO!

That period afterword, paired with an experienced truck driver is what does it. Someone who shows the new CDL holder how it should be done.

Maybe YOU didn't need that, but we all have apparently seen many who could benefit from a strong dose of mentoring!
From my experience the mentor was normally some 6 month "veteran" that couldn't make it on the scraps they were paid so they took the trainer position to make it.

I know that's not always the case but I think it is more often then not.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
From my experience the mentor was normally some 6 month "veteran" that couldn't make it on the scraps they were paid so they took the trainer position to make it.

I know that's not always the case but I think it is more often then not.
Unfortunately, at many carriers that's the case, and why there needs to be federal regulation in this.

That's also why there isn't. The big ATA megas absolutely oppose this. Their turnover is so high, they'd be screwed. Its unfortunate, but at the Knight/Swifts a lot of their veterans have but 6 months.
 

GAnthony

Methuselah
Supporter
Unfortunately, at many carriers that's the case, and why there needs to be federal regulation in this.

That's also why there isn't. The big ATA megas absolutely oppose this. Their turnover is so high, they'd be screwed. Its unfortunate, but at the Knight/Swifts a lot of their veterans have but 6 months.
i thought the ATA wanted mandatory 1 to 2 year apprenticeship training..???
 

Jigsaw

Well-Known Member
You guys make to much out of this. You drive a vehicle and you don't run into or over things.

Is it really that hard?
For some people driving a truck is hard because its big and something theyre not used to. Especially when the schools teach mostly usless crap instead of actually driving the truck
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
For some people driving a truck is hard because its big and something theyre not used to. Especially when the schools teach mostly usless crap instead of actually driving the truck
I went to the tech school in Mitchell sd for my CDL. I picked up on a lot of the tasks quickly. School was 8 weeks long. At the 6th week, I actually passed my MN CDL road test and got my actual license.

I wasn't allowed to drive after and yet I wasn't allowed to have my certificate of completion if I stopped going to classes.

Some of the folks that were in class with me were one-tooth wonders. One lady talked so much trash on how good she was but consumed the short days we had on the driving range for her lack of ability. There were days you could see her walk away crying from the defeat. It was rather intimidating wanting to help her but unable to as it was something they just had to do on their own.

How she managed to pass a Nebraska road test is beyond me.

All she talked about is how she was one of the best drivers at "Smurf". Seward motor freight.
 
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Humble pie

Living like a refugee
Supporter
I wrote that article “The Way People Talk On The CB” because I always noticed when two or more guys with even half assed southern accents got on the radio the accents got deeper and deeper as the conversation went on as if they were trying to outdo each other.

Always made me insane. I’m almost glad the CB is pretty dead.
And yet they make millions in Nashville with that fake accent. Y’all are just pissed nobody tries to sound like you when they talk.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
i thought the ATA wanted mandatory 1 to 2 year apprenticeship training..???
:biglaugh: You got a future in standup comedy!

For some people driving a truck is hard because its big and something theyre not used to. Especially when the schools teach mostly usless crap instead of actually driving the truck
That's a problem. Schools have to be affordable, but driving instruction in a big truck is expensive. That's why that finishing training by a carrier is so critical to the process. They can afford to provide training time with an experienced driver because the truck is earning revenue.

Somewhere we got to the point where minimally trained students with a new CDL are thought of as "truck drivers." While keeping the truck in the middle of a lane on a rural highway with little traffic may not "be that hard," keeping track of the end of the trailer, other traffic, where the truck is going, traffic hazards, navigating, winter driving, urban congestion thrown at a new CDL holder can be overwhelming.

A lot of folks don't have the life experience of the military either. That's a whole level of maturity that changes one's attitudes and perspectives. Instead of flailing around and whining, the training kicks in.

The CDL school does something else. It provides legal cover to the carrier. Someone without that certificate who gets in an accident can be branded as a "negligent hire," which is about the easiest liability lawsuit for an ambulance chasin' attorney to win. Want your trucking business shutdown? Lose one of those.
 

Jigsaw

Well-Known Member
:biglaugh: You got a future in standup comedy!



That's a problem. Schools have to be affordable, but driving instruction in a big truck is expensive. That's why that finishing training by a carrier is so critical to the process. They can afford to provide training time with an experienced driver because the truck is earning revenue.

Somewhere we got to the point where minimally trained students with a new CDL are thought of as "truck drivers." While keeping the truck in the middle of a lane on a rural highway with little traffic may not "be that hard," keeping track of the end of the trailer, other traffic, where the truck is going, traffic hazards, navigating, winter driving, urban congestion thrown at a new CDL holder can be overwhelming.

A lot of folks don't have the life experience of the military either. That's a whole level of maturity that changes one's attitudes and perspectives. Instead of flailing around and whining, the training kicks in.

The CDL school does something else. It provides legal cover to the carrier. Someone without that certificate who gets in an accident can be branded as a "negligent hire," which is about the easiest liability lawsuit for an ambulance chasin' attorney to win. Want your trucking business shutdown? Lose one of those.
Schenider only trains people for 2 weeks after getting their cdl. And half of that is team driving
 

BlackBart

Shorebilly
Supporter
Nobodies saying you can't go get it.

But to think a school will make you a truck driver is a fallacy.

They simply teach you to pass a state requirement to obtain a license to Operate a vehicle to a minimum federal level.
In a ideal world ya pass the test and learn the rest on the job. Seems to me its always been that way.... that is til the new gps generation appeared
 

Adk Bob

Member
No more a truck driver than you are a carpenter or a welder.
Not true. New CDL holders may not have years of experience but, they have learned to drive, some backing skills, how to pretrip and some other basics. They now have a foundation to build on. Hopefully, their employer will take the baton and continue with their training.

Companies can't afford to "train" new drivers for months. Stop attacking newbies and start supporting them. Nobody in any trade waits to start working solo with years experience.
 
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