How’d you learn what you know?

Sinister

Order of The Gilded Flip Flop
Staff member
Supporter
I remember when the Petro in Rochelle, IL didn’t have that second lot across the street with the Blue Beacon. It was just a dirt lot. In winter the snow and ice would pack down, like it does.

One night after driving for a billion hours straight, I pulled right into this lot and onto that packed snow ice.

In the morning I could not get going for the life of me despite the fact I was in solid, level ground.

My warm tires had melted into the snow pack just enough to rob me of traction.

That’s how I learned to not park on stuff that melts with warm tires.

Park with warm tires on stuff that melts.


Whatever...

Syntax Nazis.

In my brain....

Shut up.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
I didn't know how to blind side.
Blind siding came because of the lack of Google satt maps 20 some years ago to see what way was the right way to approach driveways and buildings. before ****ing myself completely. 👍
 

GAnthony

The Eldest Member
Supporter
I remember when the Petro in Rochelle, IL didn’t have that second lot across the street with the Blue Beacon. It was just a dirt lot. In winter the snow and ice would pack down, like it does.

One night after driving for a billion hours straight, I pulled right into this lot and onto that packed snow ice.

In the morning I could not get going for the life of me despite the fact I was in solid, level ground.

My warm tires had melted into the snow pack just enough to rob me of traction.

That’s how I learned to not park on stuff that melts with warm tires.

Park with warm tires on stuff that melts.


Whatever...

Syntax Nazis.

In my brain....

Shut up.
actually, one of my first trainers taught me, that when it is snowy, and i pull into a parking area, to move back and forth several times, to pack down the snow..when i did that MY first time, a couple of drivers thought it was funny, and said so on the radio.

some other driver chimed in and said, that it was smart, and i'd be getting out, while they sit and spin.

can't say if they listened to him or not, couldn't give a flip.
 

quillcom

Well-Known Member
Shifting was the worst for me.

"Match the engine speed with the road speed." Huh!!!

Granted my trainer did not tell me this but the intermess
did.

So I"m looking at the rpm and the speedo looking
to match 20mph/20rpm. This can't be right.

I look some more on the tube with the U.

"Match engine speed with transmission speed."

Ok, and how I do that was not really explained.
Like its hard for people to explain it right but its really
not.

Even on this forum I did a quick search for the
topic and its not really explained. So when I finally saw a topic
on it and it said...

Rev Matching

Thats when the half watt light bulb lit up in me and I said ohh that's what
they mean.

Your just trying to get the revs of the engine to be in sync (match)
the revs of the clutch plate/transmission and you can achieve that by looking at your
rpm's while downshifting and hitting the accelerator.

Wish someone would have told me all this and also that the sweet spot to rev is in the 10-1500 rpm.

But now that I'm an accomplished floater it all makes sense now what they were trying to tell me.
 

Sinister

Order of The Gilded Flip Flop
Staff member
Supporter
I almost had a mess on my hands this morning.

I woke up in Sturgeon Bay to 30 degrees and rain.

Pretty slippery getting out of the parking lot with an empty to head back to Beaver Dam, but once I was back on HWY 57 it seemed that Door County had salted once and things were okay.

Still I was only moving about 55.

Still dark out, early on a Saturday. Little to no traffic.

Then I noticed the appearance of the pavement changed slightly. I’m not sure what tipped me off.

I glanced in my mirror and all noticed something that always spooks the hell out of me, that an old timer once told me.

I was no longer throwing mist from the tires. The road had iced over completely.

I left off the throttle and almost lost it right there. I could feel the tractor getting squirming and the trailer just itching to come around and take first place. I never touched the brake and thank god I was on a pretty flat stretch of road.

I basically coasted down to 15 mph or so, and even then could feel the entire setup wanted to go sideways on me.

I spent most of the next hour back into Green Bay cursing Brown County and wondering how I was going to remove the seat from the vacuum my butt had created.

When you lose the mist off the tires, things are bad.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
How'd you learn what you know? Stories from old timers taken to heart, or bitter experience.

When does the road freeze? Depends.

If its cold out, below freezing and the sun is out, the road will most likely stay wet until the sun starts getting low. Black ice is those wet patches after they freeze.

Bridges freeze before the road does because of the cold air circulating around the entire structure.

Patches in shade late in the day will freeze before areas still in direct light.

Well travelled areas will stay wet longer than less travelled areas - passing lanes, turn lanes, exit ramps. Make sure you're slowed down before using them.

If it's warmer out, above freezing, and the temperature is dropping, it will take longer for the road to freeze. It may be down to 28 for an hour or so, before the road freezes. All of the above applies still.

Your butt is one of the best tools you have. If you start feeling little sideways jerks, that's one of your tires breaking loose. It's telling you to slow down. Cars and lightly loaded semis will have trouble first. As Sinister Sinister said, if the road looks wet in your rearview mirrors, and you're not seeing spray, you have trouble.
 

Joker11

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I took a Professional driving class called The Smith System. Very well known in the corporate world. Not a tractor type of class, but the basics are same. Do a complete walk around your vehicle first, and after stopping for a bit, Leave room, look ahead, double check mirrors, don’t back up unless you must. If you pay attention and plan ahead, you almost never MUST back up. Truck driving is obviously a bit different. But it seems to have worked for me. I have over 20yrs and no tickets with a ton of miles and several trucks later. None of them class 8, just 1 ton and smaller. Not trying to claim fame, here.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
I took a Professional driving class called The Smith System. Very well known in the corporate world. Not a tractor type of class, but the basics are same. Do a complete walk around your vehicle first, and after stopping for a bit, Leave room, look ahead, double check mirrors, don’t back up unless you must. If you pay attention and plan ahead, you almost never MUST back up. Truck driving is obviously a bit different. But it seems to have worked for me. I have over 20yrs and no tickets with a ton of miles and several trucks later. None of them class 8, just 1 ton and smaller. Not trying to claim fame, here
Werner and a few others use or used to use the Smith System.
 

Joker11

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I don’t know how long they have been around. I took it SOMEWHERE in my career. I have had to carry a medical card for most of it.
 

r3gulator3

Friendly Neighborhood Former Technician
Staff member
Supporter
I took a Professional driving class called The Smith System. Very well known in the corporate world. Not a tractor type of class, but the basics are same. Do a complete walk around your vehicle first, and after stopping for a bit, Leave room, look ahead, double check mirrors, don’t back up unless you must. If you pay attention and plan ahead, you almost never MUST back up. Truck driving is obviously a bit different. But it seems to have worked for me. I have over 20yrs and no tickets with a ton of miles and several trucks later. None of them class 8, just 1 ton and smaller. Not trying to claim fame, here.
I went through a Smith system class when I first got my CDL back in 1998 (class B). The videos I watched were related to operating class 6-7 CMV. It was a great course. It’s still how I drive today. I had 2 tickets in the 2 decades. Both were in Hinesville GA by the same cop in 2006. (Between deployments) and both times I was trying to get to my girlfriends house after work.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
I went through a Smith system class when I first got my CDL back in 1998 (class B). The videos I watched were related to operating class 6-7 CMV. It was a great course. It’s still how I drive today. I had 2 tickets in the 2 decades. Both were in Hinesville GA by the same cop in 2006. (Between deployments) and both times I was trying to get to my girlfriends house after work.
Reasonable advice except the part that convinces newbs they should be running below the speed of surrounding traffic to the left of the granny lane - you know 55 in lane 2 when everyone else is doing 80ish.
 
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