Does it "hurt" a truck to run it right at 80000 all the time?

BrandonCDLtrucker

Well-Known Member
I've always wondered that. Sometimes my runs are packing foam with a full trailer to the door being 2000lbs and sometimes I run paper loads right at max gross of 80K. For people who run their trucks at full gross all the time, does that hurt the truck? I mean logic would say that it is going to wear out some components faster but if the truck is designed for it, it shouldn't do much right? When someone buys a used truck they always talk about miles. But I would think that a truck with 400000 miles hauling packing foam would be a better buy than an otherwise identical truck at 200000 miles running those heavy paper loads. What do y'all think?
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
More weight is harder on the truck, but they were designed to handle it.

Maintenance costs will be higher if a truck consistently hauls heavier weight, but not much higher.

Probably notice more of an effect on the trailer.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
There's days I swear it takes more skill to run around light than heavy
 

BrandonCDLtrucker

Well-Known Member
That’s almost 44,000 pounds. That’d be tough to scale legal. I definitely wouldn’t go near an open scale loaded that heavy

Can you get an overweight permit on a dry van?
Yes but I don't need to. I can carry 45000 in the trailer and I'll be at 79850. 44000 is nothing. My bobtail is 20000 and my trailer is 14850. I can carry a tad more if I have like less than 1/4 tank of fuel. I've gone as high as 45400 with low fuel. I had to slide the 5th wheel and tandems for optimal weight and balance but I scaled legal at the scales on i-10 near I 55 north. Pulled me in for a full stop scale too, not weigh in motion.
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
Supporter
Yes but I don't need to. I can carry 45000 in the trailer and I'll be at 79850. 44000 is nothing. My bobtail is 20000 and my trailer is 14850. I can carry a tad more if I have like less than 1/4 tank of fuel. I've gone as high as 45400 with low fuel. I had to slide the 5th wheel and tandems for optimal weight and balance but I scaled legal at the scales on i-10 near I 55 north. Pulled me in for a full stop scale too, not weigh in motion.
I’ve heard of this “sliding tandems”, but I haven’t tried it :confused-96:

Dry van is too much work, I’ll still to open deck

You went near an open scale, on PURPOSE? :coocoo:
 

tommyh

Well-Known Member
I used to haul stone and sand with a quad axle dump and framesless dumps
I always hauled 80,000-92,000,we got paid by the ton
half my miles was deadhead
nothing we could do about that
we hauled to one plant out the back gate of the rock quarry to a plant,100,000 each load
truck held up good considering the weight but I did have the kingpins rebuilt,because of going in and out of those rought rockholes.They was hard on a truck.Weight didn`t seem to bother me too bad
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
You're going to have more suspension-related repairs than folks who run 10,000 lb "poof" loads. Typically your drive axle shocks will need replacement more frequently, as well as spring bushings. I replace my drive axle shocks yearly because of the beating they take. Another item is to have the u-bolts holding your drive axles on re-torqued every couple of years. If they loosen up (actually its the bolts stretching under tension that's the problem) it will allow your air bags to wander around a bit, and prevent you from being able to get a decent three-day alignment.

None of this address the problems your steer axle has with the crap roads we have these days.

You can probably expect to average around $1000 or so in suspension repairs every year running up near those weights. Unless you have the tools to do it yourself.
 
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BrandonCDLtrucker

Well-Known Member
Oh ok. Nobody mentioned brake or tire wear. Heavy loads don't affect these items much? My truck has a 12 speed auto and so I use the jake brake in 3rd stage as much as possible. It's brought my rig at almost max gross weight from 68 down to 6mph safely, quickly and without having to touch the service brakes. When I had a standard I had jakes but I couldn't rev the engine nearly enough to get the amount of braking the auto gives me from jakes alone.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Good points on the front suspension, and why I don’t plan on having another truck that doesn’t have at least a 13k rating up front.
 
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Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Oh ok. Nobody mentioned brake or tire wear. Heavy loads don't affect these items much? My truck has a 12 speed auto and so I use the jake brake in 3rd stage as much as possible. It's brought my rig at almost max gross weight from 68 down to 6mph safely, quickly and without having to touch the service brakes. When I had a standard I had jakes but I couldn't rev the engine nearly enough to get the amount of braking the auto gives me from jakes alone.
Brakes and tires will definitely be abused more with heavy weight, but not really enough to gauge a cost. Driving habits will always be your biggest factor here.

I’m close to 400k on my truck, close to 70% brake life left.

I run 12.5k or higher quite often on my steers, and will easily go over 200k on those, barring a road hazard that I can’t avoid. Been right at 13k many times, and even over on a few loads.
 

BrandonCDLtrucker

Well-Known Member
Yea how you drive would probably effect the truck far more than anything else huh? To me it also matters where you drive. I would guess up and down hills wears tires and brakes more than flat and level. Probably matters what roads as far as suspension wear. Some of these glass smooth interstates I would guess would not wear much at all but then you have 65 south of Louisville or 71 near Cincinnati and those roads are punishing.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
I used to love how one company I worked for would book these heavy grossed out loads because the rate on the load board looked good. Never taking into account the mountains and high rate of fuel consumption + wear on tires etc.
The man took a very profitable company it nose dived it right into the ground.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
Yea how you drive would probably effect the truck far more than anything else huh? To me it also matters where you drive. I would guess up and down hills wears tires and brakes more than flat and level. Probably matters what roads as far as suspension wear. Some of these glass smooth interstates I would guess would not wear much at all but then you have 65 south of Louisville or 71 near Cincinnati and those roads are punishing.
Tire inflation has the biggest effect on tire life. If you run around on under inflated tires, you'll wear them out sooner. OTOH, buying a set of fuel economy inefficient tires that last you for years will cost more than a set that have low rolling resistance, but wear faster.
 
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