Trucking News: Convoy research takes deep dive into trucking’s empty miles problem

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Recent research issued by Seattle-based digital freight broker Convoy takes a long look at the empty miles issues impacting trucking, including how when miles are wasted so is fuel, coupled with more carbon emitted, and drivers spending more idle hours on the road and at docks.

Convoy’s research, entitled “What you need to know about empty miles in trucking,” by Aaron Terrazas, Director of Economic Research, Convoy, identifies myriad trends and themes related to empty miles, including:

  • reducing waste is critical to the freight industry and the miles that truckers drive empty are an important part of industry waste;
  • available data suggest remarkably little progress in reducing the miles that truckers drive empty over the past two decades; and
  • recent estimates of empty miles typically put the phenomenon around 20% of total miles driven, but these numbers include a wide range of trucks and trailers.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Convoy has actually started putting multiple loads together on their load board, trying to move them as a package deal. I've seen 4-5 loads placed together in one offer, most often with this many they are local loads.

Usually, the ones I see are far more non productive than deadheading a little to get another load. Sure, the load might only be 5 miles away, but you are delivering a load at 0700, and the load they want to match with it doesn't pick up until 2200. And, it is in the Chicago area, so you have to drive somewhere to go park all day, so you can pick up a load that night after sitting all day. Not all of them are this way, some are actually decent.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
Convoy has actually started putting multiple loads together on their load board, trying to move them as a package deal. I've seen 4-5 loads placed together in one offer, most often with this many they are local loads.

Usually, the ones I see are far more non productive than deadheading a little to get another load. Sure, the load might only be 5 miles away, but you are delivering a load at 0700, and the load they want to match with it doesn't pick up until 2200. And, it is in the Chicago area, so you have to drive somewhere to go park all day, so you can pick up a load that night after sitting all day. Not all of them are this way, some are actually decent.
That set up might work for drivers that like to work nights but, still you have to sleep and drive in Chicago at night and that is never a good idea.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
That set up might work for drivers that like to work nights but, still you have to drive into Chicago at night and that is never a good idea.
It's not even like that. It's basically a load you pick up one day, deliver the next morning, and then have sit all day after your 10 hour break to pick up the next load. Makes no sense at all, but I'm sure some are grabbing them anyway.
 

nan

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Depends how much they pay whether it's worth it. I mean 5 hours deadheading vs 10 hours sitting on your butt...could be a wash. Get a restart, don't burn fuel, browse Tinder, etc.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Depends how much they pay whether it's worth it. I mean 5 hours deadheading vs 10 hours sitting on your butt...could be a wash. Get a restart, don't burn fuel, browse Tinder, etc.
LOL, it's Chicago area. who would have to deadhead that far for a load?

But, no, the pay doesn't reflect the downtime at all.
 

nan

Well-Known Member
Supporter
LOL, it's Chicago area. who would have to deadhead that far for a load?

But, no, the pay doesn't reflect the downtime at all.
I mean your longer deadheading vs taking this local stuff.

I don't sit very well either. But mostly because I don't have any semblance of a home in a day cab. Heck, waiting a couple hours at our own yard annoyed the daylights out of me this morning.
 
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