C.R. England opens new driver retention, recognition office

Maria

Diet Coke
Staff member
SALT LAKE CITY — C.R. England has opened the doors to its newest office, Driver Retention and Recognition, at its headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah. The office is designed to help build the company driver and independent contractor relationships to create long term and successful commercial drivers.

“This office will create stronger recognition for our drivers and promote a better and more connected work environment to our road warriors,” said Bud Pierce, director, Capacity Assurance – Retention and Recognition.

Pierce will lead the office to create driver recognition and award programs to instill the C.R. England values of success and accomplishment in the drivers.

Prior to his current role, Pierce held the title of director, Horizon Truck Sales and Leasing. He has been in the transportation industry for the last 25 years.

full story
 

Racer X 69

Member
Now maybe they can get their drivers to know how to drive in the snow or at least know when to get the heck off the road and stop holding up traffic.

Like that dork that I passed in Montana a year ago last December, coming back from Winterpeg. I got caught up in a snowstorm heading West out of billings and caught up with some slower traffic (like 5 to 10 miles an hour). After passing about 35 trucks and a few cars I see a CR England leading the parade.

And after I get by I was able to run 60 to 65 all the way to Bozeman.

Why didn't this sap have enough sense to get off the road if he didn't have the nads to run a little faster?

Drive Life.

Right.
 

Sinister

Order of The Gilded Flip Flop
Staff member
Supporter
I'm not even going to bother to click the link, but thanks for posting it anyway.

To me, these issues are very simple:

-allow a person a decent, consistent living.

- do not rip them off with a bullshit lease program that is documented time and again to a 60-70% failure rate

- provide decent, REGULAR home time

- offer decent, competitive health and retirement benefits. Driving van freight is no harder than an office job. Theres no reason for excessive health care insurance rates in van trucking outfits.



For me, that's really about it. I don't really expect much from trucking companies.
 

Black Knight

Well-Known Member
I agree sinister. Should they give their drivers those things that you mention, maybe they could attract better drivers.

As for Racer. In adverse or bad weather conditions I believe that all should stay at whatever feels comfortable. Apparently that driver was at his/her comfort zone. Why should he/she get off the road,just because his/her speed dosent measure up to what you think it should be? If his/her comfort zone is not as fast as yours, you have the right to pass him/her.
 

blackw900

Flatbedder For Life!
Oh cool....Now CR England can treat their drivers like trash and then send them to this guy and he can tell them that they;re not being treated like trash and maybe give them a little plastic gold cup with "Driver Of The Day" written on it.....To show them that they are appreciated.

Then tell them to get back out there and get their ass in the truck and stop complaining because there are plenty of other retards out there that would love to have their job.

I agree sinister. Should they give their drivers those things that you mention, maybe they could attract better drivers.

As for Racer. In adverse or bad weather conditions I believe that all should stay at whatever feels comfortable. Apparently that driver was at his/her comfort zone. Why should he/she get off the road,just because his/her speed dosent measure up to what you think it should be? If his/her comfort zone is not as fast as yours, you have the right to pass him/her.

Because sometimes a poorly trained "driver" that's driving in their "comfort zone" can be a serious hazard out here in winter conditions....
 

Black Knight

Well-Known Member
Because sometimes a poorly trained "driver" that's driving in their "comfort zone" can be a serious hazard out here in winter conditions....
Do we know for a fact that the driver was "poorly trained." Just because he/she drives for England is reason to assume that that individual is "Poorly trained" and/or inexperienced?

For all we know he/she may be either highly trained and experienced or maybe poorly trained. In either case that individual deserves the right to captain his/her ship in the manner he/she considers safe and prudent in lieu of the circumstances. After all he/she is the one who gets the shaft should something go wrong, not you or me.

Besides maybe his/her comfort zone was the same as the other 35 or so drivers who followed. I am sure that if they felt it was too slow they would have passed as well. But, guessing who was right or wrong is fruitless. Like I said they should be allowed to stay within their comfort zone, and if its too slow or fast for you then do what you feel comfortable at.
 

blackw900

Flatbedder For Life!
Do we know for a fact that the driver was "poorly trained." Just because he/she drives for England is reason to assume that that individual is "Poorly trained" and/or inexperienced?
Experienced drivers don't generally choose to go to flea bag outfits like CR England...So the odds are greatly in favor of the driver being a typical England Plebe.

For all we know he/she may be either highly trained and experienced or maybe poorly trained. In either case that individual deserves the right to captain his/her ship in the manner he/she considers safe and prudent in lieu of the circumstances. After all he/she is the one who gets the shaft should something go wrong, not you or me.
If He/She/It, is driving for England.....They're already gettin' the shaft!
 

blackw900

Flatbedder For Life!
Road warriors, .. :rolllaugh:

CR England has "road warriors" View attachment 12615


The battle strategy of their road warriors is to get so fat that when they are struck by bullets....The bullets can never reach a vital organ.

The CR England "Road Warrior" battle cry...."WHEN DO WE EAT?"




The other lesser known CR England "Road Warrior" battle cry is...."Who's buyin' dinner because I'm paid so little that I can't afford it."
View attachment 12615
 

Duck

Trump
Supporter
The battle strategy of their road warriors is to get so fat that when they are struck by bullets....The bullets can never reach a vital organ.
Useless fact # 2,052,480:

The ancient Roman gladiators didn't look like the muscular actors who play them in movies. In real life, they were chubby. Not fat like sumo wrestlers, but they intentionally fattened themselves up so shallow stabs and sword injuries wouldn't hit vital organs.

From The Gladiator Diet

Contemporary accounts of gladiator life sometimes refer to the warriors as hordearii--literally, "barley men." Grossschmidt and collaborator Fabian Kanz subjected bits of the bone to isotopic analysis, a technique that measures trace chemical elements such as calcium, strontium, and zinc, to see if they could find out why. They turned up some surprising results. Compared to the average inhabitant of Ephesus, gladiators ate more plants and very little animal protein. The vegetarian diet had nothing to do with poverty or animal rights. Gladiators, it seems, were fat. Consuming a lot of simple carbohydrates, such as barley, and legumes, like beans, was designed for survival in the arena. Packing in the carbs also packed on the pounds. "Gladiators needed subcutaneous fat," Grossschmidt explains. "A fat cushion protects you from cut wounds and shields nerves and blood vessels in a fight." Not only would a lean gladiator have been dead meat, he would have made for a bad show. Surface wounds "look more spectacular," says Grossschmidt. "If I get wounded but just in the fatty layer, I can fight on," he adds. "It doesn't hurt much, and it looks great for the spectators."
 

Black Knight

Well-Known Member
Gee, sure appears that some of us have a real dislike for C.R.England. I realize there are a lot of law suits, personnal accusations, etc. But, I dont see the reason for the continual attack.

All big companies will get sued from time to time, for whatever reason. All companies are out to make money and employee beware. Profit is the only thing that they strive for. But we all had to start somewhere, even at a place like England. Besides I am sure there are some content employees there, but usually all you hear from are the disgruntaled ones.

Realize everytime England is mentined, is a excuse to bash them. But, could we possibly restrain, unless you have personal info. I have never worked for them, I like to give then the benefit of doubt. Although, I must admit there was a time when I possibly would have worked for them to gain the experience I needed to accell in this profession. Luckily I did not have to.
 

SweetDaddy

Well-Known Member
Sounds like a bunch of teenage squealing girls

Not that teenagers are badd....tho u turdz need 2 wise up

Shut up now or else
 

Racer X 69

Member
As for Racer. In adverse or bad weather conditions I believe that all should stay at whatever feels comfortable. Apparently that driver was at his/her comfort zone. Why should he/she get off the road,just because his/her speed dosent measure up to what you think it should be? If his/her comfort zone is not as fast as yours, you have the right to pass him/her.
Re-read my post. This guy was driving far too slowly to be safe on the road. He was creating a hazard, and should have gotten off the road and parked it.

Do we know for a fact that the driver was "poorly trained." Just because he/she drives for England is reason to assume that that individual is "Poorly trained" and/or inexperienced?

For all we know he/she may be either highly trained and experienced or maybe poorly trained. In either case that individual deserves the right to captain his/her ship in the manner he/she considers safe and prudent in lieu of the circumstances. After all he/she is the one who gets the shaft should something go wrong, not you or me.

Besides maybe his/her comfort zone was the same as the other 35 or so drivers who followed. I am sure that if they felt it was too slow they would have passed as well. But, guessing who was right or wrong is fruitless. Like I said they should be allowed to stay within their comfort zone, and if its too slow or fast for you then do what you feel comfortable at.
Someone who cannot proceed at a decent pace during inclement weather is a hazard to themselves, and other drivers on the road.

The way this guy was driving clearly indicated that he did not possess the skills or confidence to operate a commercial motor vehicle safely and at a reasonable speed on the conditions that existed. He should have exited the highway and parked the truck for the night.

Many drivers were passing. After I cleared the rolling road block many of them followed my lead.

Gee, sure appears that some of us have a real dislike for C.R.England. I realize there are a lot of law suits, personnal accusations, etc. But, I dont see the reason for the continual attack.
If the majority of the drivers for CR England would exhibit better behavior on the road and in truckstops, perhaps they wouldn't catch so much ****.

Realize everytime England is mentined, is a excuse to bash them. But, could we possibly restrain, unless you have personal info.
The experience I posted above was a personal experience. I have literally hundreds of them. Here are a couple more:

On interstate 90, Westbound near Ellensburg, WA a CR England truck suddenly changed lanes and slowed drastically, just as I was about to overtake him. He then turned into the crossover that is clearly posted "Authorized Vehicles Only", and executed a u-turn. There was a pasenger, I assume a "trainer", but I can't be sure. This is clearly a illegal, stupid and unsafe thing to do.

More times than I can count, CR England trucks fuel and then leave their truck at the pumps, rather than pull forward, while they go inside to use the restroom, shop around in the c-store, and get their fuel receipts.

Also, more times than I can count, CR England trucks drive way too fast in the truckstop parking lots. I have come close to getting hit by these idiots, both in my truck, and as I am walking in the parking lot.

Far too many times I have been rolling along, about to overtake a CR England truck, only to have these morons suddenly signal and pull out in front of me. How is it that someone cannot look in the mirror and judge the closing speed of another truck and not notice that the overtaking truck is going 10 to 15 miles an hour faster than them?

I'm only calling them as I see them.
 

blackw900

Flatbedder For Life!
I have personally experienced EVERY one of those things with CR England trucks as well.....

I realize that they treat their drivers like shlt and that is a large reason that their drivers don't seem to give damn....After all, They are the only OTR trucking company in the country that has armed guards at their terminal to keep the drivers away from management!


Why do you suppose they have to do that?
 

SweetDaddy

Well-Known Member
I have personally experienced EVERY one of those things with CR England trucks as well.....

I realize that they treat their drivers like shlt and that is a large reason that their drivers don't seem to give damn....After all, They are the only OTR trucking company in the country that has armed guards at their terminal to keep the drivers away from management!


Why do you suppose they have to do that?
Holy **** ....I hope that isn't true, I have never heard that one

That speaks volumes about them if it is so..this is truely the 1st. Time I have heard this

[MENTION=3730]Racer X 69[/MENTION]

Thx dude..!!! had a few things I had to do on while I was awol
 

Racer X 69

Member
Someone who cannot proceed at a decent pace during inclement weather is a hazard to themselves, and other drivers on the road.

The way this guy was driving clearly indicated that he did not possess the skills or confidence to operate a commercial motor vehicle safely and at a reasonable speed on the conditions that existed. He should have exited the highway and parked the truck for the night.

Many drivers were passing. After I cleared the rolling road block many of them followed my lead.
I might also point out that I usually pull flatbed freight, but the company I drive for gets an occasional dry van load. This trip was one such load. I had taken a load of aircraft tooling from Seattle, WA to Winnipeg, MB to a Boeing plant. It was the last week before Christmas, and there wasn't any freight coming back, so they bounced me all the way home.

So here I was, in Montana, in a snowstorm, with an empty trailer.

I didn't have any trouble going by this traffic jam that was running in the right lane on mostly bare pavement, in the hammer lane, in about a foot of fresh, chewy snow, with an empty trailer. Just locked in the diffs, had an easy grip on the wheel and kept a light foot on the pedal.

Easy Squeezy, No Pain, No Stain.
 

Duck

Trump
Supporter
I might also point out that I usually pull flatbed freight, but the company I drive for gets an occasional dry van load. This trip was one such load. I had taken a load of aircraft tooling from Seattle, WA to Winnipeg, MB to a Boeing plant. It was the last week before Christmas, and there wasn't any freight coming back, so they bounced me all the way home.

So here I was, in Montana, in a snowstorm, with an empty trailer.

I didn't have any trouble going by this traffic jam that was running in the right lane on mostly bare pavement, in the hammer lane, in about a foot of fresh, chewy snow, with an empty trailer. Just locked in the diffs, had an easy grip on the wheel and kept a light foot on the pedal.

Easy Squeezy, No Pain, No Stain.
Have you ever heard that you're MORE likely to wipe out in snow when you're running down the road with the diffs locked? It's only for when you think you might get stuck and not be able to go forwards. It's not for adding stability going down the road.
 

Racer X 69

Member
Have you ever heard that you're MORE likely to wipe out in snow when you're running down the road with the diffs locked? It's only for when you think you might get stuck and not be able to go forwards. It's not for adding stability going down the road.
Every time I stepped out to pass in the chewy stuff in the hammer lane the tractor got real squirrely. With the diffs locked in it straightened right up and got good forward bite.

Kinda like using the 4 wheel drive on my pickup.
 
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