Bought a set of Andersen Eco-Flaps

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
So, got a bit of extra time on my current load and decided to shut down early at the Petro in Joplin, MO. Stopped at the J first to get a shower then came over here because I have been wanting to get a set of eco-flaps for the truck. I was planning on special ordering them from the eco-flap website so I could get truckersforum.net put on them, but decided against spending any extra money on custom stuff like that.

I've talked to a few owner operators about the mud flaps over the past several months and those that actually track fuel economy and installed them on truck and trailer claim various gains in fuel economy. Those installing on just the tractor were about 50-50 in regards to a noticeable gain, but it is hard to track any difference in fuel economy unless you are looking at more than .2/gallon when you make a change.

Everyone I talked to though swore by a significant reduction in road spray, which in itself makes them worth the investment.

Even if I get only half a tenth increase in mileage, they will still pay for themselves very quickly and put a little extra money in my pocket each year.

If anybody here has or is running with the eco-flaps, or maybe another brand, it would be great to hear your experience with them.

I installed mine tonight, just in time for weather to start changing, so my chances of documenting any noticeable changes will be slim.
 

Duck

Trump
Supporter
I don't see how there's any way in hell those things will save any fuel at all, being located behind your tires.

Might reduce road spray though.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I don't see how there's any way in hell those things will save any fuel at all, being located behind your tires.
Lots of turbulence is created because of the mudflaps. It's not something where I would expect to see a significant gain, but I can see where it could result in small gains. 1/10th is $1,000/year. All I need is 1/100th to pay for the mudflaps in the course of a year.

I will have no way of telling because I haven't tracked numbers long enough on this truck, dealing with mechanical issues, and I've been totally inconsistent with speed.

I've seen the difference in road spray from trucks using these, and to me, that alone makes them well worth the money.
 

DubbleD

Color Commentator
Are you putting plan "B" into effect already?

...I was losing my mind!... Read some of my posts!
 

Southern Fried

Well-Known Member
I notice a lot of the Love's tanker fleet have these.

Years back, we had something similar (from Europe I believe) that were marketed solely on the "decreased spray" safety aspect... which they did do. I think Imperial Oil tried them on their tanker fleet. Took them all off the first winter though, they packed snow and ice too bad and froze solid several inches thick; which either pulled them off the hangers and or busted em all up when drivers tried to knock the ice off them.

Don't remember them ever putting them back on. :dunno:
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I notice a lot of the Love's tanker fleet have these.

Years back, we had something similar (from Europe I believe) that were marketed solely on the "decreased spray" safety aspect... which they did do. I think Imperial Oil tried them on their tanker fleet. Took them all off the first winter though, they packed snow and ice too bad and froze solid several inches thick; which either pulled them off the hangers and or busted em all up when drivers tried to knock the ice off them
Road spray was the purpose of the flaps. The fuel economy was actually a side effect that the company wasn't even going after.

Time will tell on the ice build up. Supposedly they do well, but they can't be any worse than the cheap flaps that were already there. I busted my regular flaps on the freightliner with the first kick to remove ice.
 

Southern Fried

Well-Known Member
Road spray was the purpose of the flaps. The fuel economy was actually a side effect that the company wasn't even going after.

Time will tell on the ice build up. Supposedly they do well, but they can't be any worse than the cheap flaps that were already there. I busted my regular flaps on the freightliner with the first kick to remove ice.
They well may do better, probably different materials. We routinely ran in much rougher snow/ice conditions than most of the U.S. The only flap we found workable was the "old-fashioned" heavy rubber ones. Like you said, plastic shatters.

Good luck with them.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Oh, and here are my mpg results after installing them.

20141031_093410.jpg

Do that with solid mud flaps!

I know you're thinking the average went down after that pic was taken........

But........

You can't prove it!
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
What is your real MPG? the one you figure off mileage and gallons purchased?
 

Jonas Jones

New Member
Mike,
I sell Eco-flaps to a lot of fleets in the Western U.S. and Canada and there is no breakage problem with ice, snow or cold. Keep your sales receipt as we have a two-year warranty on that kind of breakage (including stone throws). Was it an Eco-flap that broke when you whacked it to knock off ice? That should not happen. Most of the aero drag is trailer flaps, tractor flaps second. You will always use less fuel with Eco-flaps at any speed, although highway is where the drag is the highest. I have heard from a fleet in WA that says the spray reduction is like night and day. Remember, they are made of nylon, not plastic and have survived 6 Canadian winters and Arizona summers with no breakage. I think the European ones were actually from England and they were overbuilt and not flexible enough to survive. Eco-flaps are surprisingly flexible yet will not sail which in AZ saves you a ticket.
 
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