AfterTreatment

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
#21
If you don't have a pile of cash lying around to repair an emissions truck - if you happen to get a total dog, you're well advised to buy a pre-2004 truck and rebuild it as necessary.

I have a '09 Cascadia, that's done very well. Still, I had a wiring harness repair for an EGR valve problem, and a more pricey rebuild of the DPF system after the controller failed. Took out the DPF filter, DOC, eventually replaced the doser. Probably $14k total over 7 years. Had some warranty failures too.

That doesn't include lost revenue.

Mind you, with all of that, I count myself lucky. It could have been much, much worse. One of these trucks that refuses to work properly can easily suck up $30k or $40k of your money - that's bankruptcy level trouble.

On the whole, I like my truck. I'd have to really think about it before buying another one.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
#23
EPA 10 have DPF, EGR and def. They are from 2011 and newer.

EPA 07 have DPF and EGR. DPF seems to give the most issues and cost. Those would be in a 2008 to 2010 trucks.

EPA 04 engine only had EGR. They were from 2005-2007. Easy enough to get the EGR deleted and a rather reliable engine then.

EPA 98 was mainly a computer settings for NOx. They were 1999 to 2004 trucks.

Engine year is typically one year older than model year.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
#24
It was mentioned pre 2004 and pre 2007 trucks. Why? Educate me. I'm interested in Cummins or Detroit motors. Does it matter if it's freightliner ken or Pete?
EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) was introduced in all '04 engines, but some may be hiding in '03 trucks when the manufacturers started running out of pre-emission engines. EGR takes a portion of the exhaust, and re-circulates it as input air into the cylinders to achieve a lower peak combustion temperature. This was the first method used to decrease the formation of nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust. It was one of the worst things they ever did to modern diesel engines in the name of cleaning up what comes out of the exhaust stacks.

The engines made after 2004 had a patchwork approach used to meet the EPA mandate. Some worked well, others were junk - there was very little rhyme or reason to the difference. The CAT version of this - ACERT - was internal to the engine, and caused Caterpillar enough trouble that they exited the class 8 truck engine market.

To meet the next level of EPA mandate, soot reduction, Detroit and Cummins turned to DPF (Diesel Particulate Filters.) Early '08 Freightliners were equipped with a Series 60 Detroit engine and a DPF filter... it increases the back pressure on the exhaust which decreases engine performance. S60 and earlier diesels just don't do well with a DPF choaking them.

In late '08 Freightliner introduced the Cascadia with a DD15 engine. It was the first engine designed from the ground up to meet the new EPA requirements. They've gotten better as time has gone by and the design has matured. I have an '09 that does well.

In '10, the EPA mandated further NOX reductions. Detroit and Cummins went with SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) that requires DEF (Diesel Exhaust Fluid) to be injected into the exhaust stream.

Navistar using the CAT engine as a base turned to "massive EGR" as an approach with the MaxxForce series of engines. MaxxForce is easy... they're total crap, and the lawsuits forced Navistar into bankruptcy.

Early SCR engines - both DD15s and Cummins ISX engines are troublesome. Like the EGR and DPF technologies, some work well - others don't. The trick is finding one that works without investing a mountain of cash to keep it running until you figure out what is wrong.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
#25
EPA 04 engine only had EGR. They were from 2005-2007. Easy enough to get the EGR deleted and a rather reliable engine then.
Yup, but the risk you run is that it is illegal to tamper with emissions equipment - which is what a "delete" is. So far no one with the possible exception of California is checking for this. I understand inspecting for deletes is part of the Canadian truck inspection process.

I had a Pittsburgh Power Box on my truck for awhile, and at least one Freightliner dealership refused to work on my truck while it was hooked up.