After 21hrs on a wonderful GreyHound I am here in Gary,IN for Roehl orientation

Spartan718

Well-Known Member
I am here in the hotel mentally preparing for what lies ahead. Tomorrow is "physical day" and then we get started on Tues. I will chronicle my adventures with Roehl's training here for other new drivers considering Roehl. :holdflag:
 

Tazz

Infidel
Good luck.

Keep one thing in mind worry about the mechanics of what you are trying to do not the speed.
 

Spartan718

Well-Known Member
Completed day 2 and passed the physical requirements for flat bed. Got a drive a little bit to day on what they call "The Track. I feel a lot more confident, my shifting is good. I just have to familiarize my self with the truck I am in. The shifting pattern in the Freightliner Classic I am driving is smaller than the Macks I learned in, and the cornering with the split-axel flat bed trailer really isn't that much harder than a dry van. I hope to get out on the interstate tomorrow. Having a little trouble with my trip planning, but I guess I should get better and faster with practice.
 

j911brick

Well-Known Member
They made you ride the bus to orientation? They don't think enough of you to buy a plane ticket?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gus

Spartan718

Well-Known Member
They made you ride the bus to orientation? They don't think enough of you to buy a plane ticket?
I could have flown, but i would have had to pay the difference, most companies will bus you in, but Roehl also covers lunch and dinner while here at orientation, most companies only give you lunch.
 

j911brick

Well-Known Member
I could have flown, but i would have had to pay the difference, most companies will bus you in, but Roehl also covers lunch and dinner while here at orientation, most companies only give you lunch.
Do they make the managers/execs they hire take the bus; or do they only think so little of truck drivers?
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Wow, if it wasn't bad enough that you had to ride a bus, you ended up being dropped off in Gary Indiana. yuck! :)
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
Do they make the managers/execs they hire take the bus; or do they only think so little of truck drivers?
Truckers are the only ones I know of who ***** about free transportation to their work location, often hundreds of miles from where they live. Name another job that will provide free transportation just to try out for the job. Besides the military.

Gawd!
 

j911brick

Well-Known Member
Truckers are the only ones I know of who ***** about free transportation to their work location, often hundreds of miles from where they live. Name another job that will provide free transportation just to try out for the job. Besides the military.

Gawd!
Pretty much all skilled or semi skill professions where the employer needs the labor. I know mechanics that have been flow cross country for an interview. Except for trucking, I have never heard of anybody being put on a bus. My attitude is: if they aren't will to put you on a plane they really don't need you. They are just looking for cheap labor.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Truckers are the only ones I know of who ***** about free transportation to their work location, often hundreds of miles from where they live. Name another job that will provide free transportation just to try out for the job. Besides the military.

Gawd!
KLLM put me on a bus several years ago from Fort Worth, TX to Jackson, MS. That was an absolutely dreadful ride, and I have never done it since.

Only other job I had to travel to for orientation was with Crete. They did my actual hiring in Dallas, then gave me a truck and I picked up and delivered a couple loads on my way to Lincoln, Nebraska for orientation.

I guess it is normal to take a bus to orientation, but I have been fortunate enough to avoid it other than that one time.
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
I opted to take the train when I came back to Swift. It was the same deal offered everybody. They reimbursed me up to the cost of a Dirty Dog ticket. My out of pocket, after reimbursement, was about $40. I didn't want to fly. Too much of a PITA.
 

Racer X 69

Member
Name another job that will provide free transportation just to try out for the job.
Many corporate positions are filled after "extensive" searches for candidates. Then they fly the person to the new location, even pay for relocation and travel costs for the family.

In the 30 years I worked at the electric utility the general manager position was vacated and refilled about a dozen times. Every candidate was flown in from whatever part of the country they were from for the interview, and the person(s) selected were then flown in for the job and their families were flown in and the moving expenses covered by the ratepayers (public utility). The compensation package was a negotiated part of the process, and always included relocation costs.

This was even done for division managers.

One manager, Manly Kanoa, was from Hawaii, and was the general manager of the customer service division. His wife refused to move stateside, and stayed "home". Mr. Kanoa commuted between the Seattle area and Hawaii for the entire year and a half he was GM of customer service. You can bet that his travel expenses were a negotiated part of his compensation package.
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
Looking around this TA I'm sitting at, most of these guys have no room to complain about riding the bus. These companies can't afford to fly every potential driver to where ever, only to have the asshat quit after six weeks. There is a very small minority of drivers who are worth flying all over the country and moving their households. Those who are worth that expense are usually independent owner operators or in a specialized sector of the industry. Joe Driver just getting started, with no credentials, not even a CDL, in many cases, is not worth the plane ticket.

When I first started, I was happy to have a job. I thought it was pretty cool that Swift paid my transportation, lodging and bought me a meal each day. If you want executive compensation, then work to get into an executive position. Many of the upper management people in this company started out as drivers. There is a reason companies (not just trucking) "head-hunt" their upper management. They want the best they can get to trust with their affairs. The mail room guy ain't it. Therefore, the mail room guy isn't going to get a flight plus moving expenses.

IMO, *****ing about free transportation hails back to the entitlement mentality. The company does not owe you anything just because you asked them to consider you for a job. When you get to be so good that you can start making demands, then you can demand a plane ticket. Until then, you're just another driver among millions. How can you tell you're there? You get personal calls requesting you go work for XYZ Company...from the CEO. I don't know of many truckers who are that awesome.
 

Nomad

Member
I've been flown a couple times. Bluebird even put me in first class. I had to sign that if I didn't stay so long I had to pay it back. No problem on that end. Riding the bus is a pain though. Too many stops. Old busses and such but I looked at it this way. I wasn't the one driving lol
 

Racer X 69

Member
There is a reason companies (not just trucking) "head-hunt" their upper management. They want the best they can get to trust with their affairs.
Well they seem to have failed miserably at it. The average tenure for a general manager at the utility I worked sat was 2.5 years. Somewhat better than the average tenure for some truck drivers, sure, but for the expense you would think they coul get someone who might stick around a bit longer and actually accomplish something worthwhile.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
Back in the '90's companies did head hunt drivers, There was a drver shortage that was projected to get a lot worse if the economy didn't go in the crapper. It was not un-common to be aproached at truck stops to work for so and so company, Bordering on annoying.

As big as this industry is and as big as Canada and the U.S. is, Trucking is a very small world. I have worked with, For and dispatched some of the same people.

Company owners will cold contact you if they have had a word of mouth reference or you have chatted and met them along the way.

There is a guy at a driver service that checks up with me waht I'm up to, Or I will call him if I need work and he puts me to work.

I would like to see the days when drivers were in heavy demand and drivers could get what they are worth and what they are willing and not willing to do,. With in reason of course.
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
Back in the '90's companies did head hunt drivers, There was a drver shortage that was projected to get a lot worse if the economy didn't go in the crapper. It was not un-common to be aproached at truck stops to work for so and so company, Bordering on annoying.

As big as this industry is and as big as Canada and the U.S. is, Trucking is a very small world. I have worked with, For and dispatched some of the same people.

Company owners will cold contact you if they have had a word of mouth reference or you have chatted and met them along the way.

There is a guy at a driver service that checks up with me waht I'm up to, Or I will call him if I need work and he puts me to work.

I would like to see the days when drivers were in heavy demand and drivers could get what they are worth and what they are willing and not willing to do,. With in reason of course.
The same has happened to me. It's how I returned to Swift. They called me and they met the few demands I made.

But, realistically, what is the percentage of drivers industry wide who are worthy of that?
 
Top