3 Days til ELD mandate, and it is going to be a mess. (for carriers and brokers)

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#1
I am sitting outside of Indy (T/A in Clayton, Monrovia, or whatever it is here). Delivered my load in Plainfield late this morning, left the receiver close to noon.

Lots of hours to run, I checked out loads while getting unloaded, and after getting to the truck stop and getting a shower. Lots of loads, but also lots of trucks, so hard to find anything other than loads of bricks or heavier at an amazing rate of around $1.25/mile. Truck is posted, nobody is emailing or calling. Every load I call on is just too cheap for me to start the truck. I plan on running until I shut down for Christmas, so no point in racking up lots of miles at cheap rates, then running out of hours.

Anyhow, the day goes on, and rates start to climb, but the loads are 150 miles away (SW Indiana). I could get the loads picked up, but not delivered the next morning due to HOS.

It gets a little later (just 30 minutes ago), and the phone is ringing. Local rates have come up, but too late in the day now as the loads are 300 miles or so and need to deliver in the morning.

Brokers are having more and more trouble finding trucks at the last minute, because more and more trucks are now on the electronic leash. Drivers, like me, are having to really watch how the game is played because that clock is ticking while sitting back relaxing all day at the truck stop.

While I haven't done this on my own for very long, I have quickly gotten accustomed to what is called the "3 o'clock hustle". Basically, the end of the day approaches, and that is when all the business deals are made, other than those carriers who take whatever long load they can find as soon as they can find it regardless what it pays.

Lots of trucks right now with electronic leashes sitting in their bunk. On December 18th, they will be plugged in. When that happens, it's going to be a mess between brokers and carriers.

Going to be interesting to see how things change between now and the beginning of the year.
 

dave350

Well-Known Member
#2
I think it’ll be interesting to see how it goes for a single truck independent. Keep us posted.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
#3
This will be very interesting to see how it all plays out after the 18th as far as rates go and it could change the whole dynamic of booking and load brokering.
 

Keendriver

Hates all of you
#4
Better rates earlier in the day?

Tryna stay positive for ya Mike.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#5
Better rates earlier in the day?
This is what I am thinking. People are used to delivering in the morning, holding out to late afternoon for the best rates, then running the load to deliver the next morning. For me, I have been getting my loads a bit earlier than many because of the ELD. Even then, I have pushed the limits a little too close for comfort a couple times.

Brokers are going to have to let the money go a little earlier I think, that or increase their risk of a load not being covered.

The game is definitely being adjusted now.

This week, I had my Monday load booked on Friday morning. Then on Monday morning, same broker hooked me up with two more loads for Tuesday and Wednesday. Delivered that last load late this morning, waited out the low rates, and ended up sitting til tomorrow to try and get the rates I want for a weekend load.
 

Rigjockey

In Gord we trust!
Supporter
#6
This is what I am thinking. People are used to delivering in the morning, holding out to late afternoon for the best rates, then running the load to deliver the next morning.
That is just it!
I am not an O/O but as a driver It worked out real well when I could empty out in the evening and then load in the morning. Doing the exact opposite of what everyone else was doing meant little waiting time.
Of course as a driver I have no idea on how the rates were.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
#7
On December 18th, they will be plugged in. When that happens, it's going to be a mess between brokers and carriers.
Except for those of us who have been on electronic logs for awhile, and have it figured out.

Don't look like the Orange Knight is gonna ride in an' save th' day, huh?
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#8
Except for those of us who have been on electronic logs for awhile, and have it figured out.

Don't look like the Orange Knight is gonna ride in an' save th' day, huh?
Which are you, the broker or the carrier? ;)

Doesn't matter how much you have it figured out. For a carrier (particularly a small carrier without their own brokerage), there is an element of chaos coming into play, doesn't matter how well you know how to operate an ELD.
 

RamblingPete

Well-Known Member
#9
And of course rush hour . If they'd fix the split sleeper birth then it would not only solve the biggest obstacle ELDs present but ironically it would help reduce congestion during rush hour. I have a feeling congestion during rush hour will now be noticeably worst with even more trucks not being able to wait it out .
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#10
Of course as a driver I have no idea on how the rates were.
yeah, definitely two different worlds.

in this world, it's going to cause chaos and bankruptcy for some.

Listening to lots of drivers right now waiting til the last minute and trying to figure out how they are going to book loads going forward to be able to manage not only their time, but getting good rates. Lots of changes coming.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
#11
I was talking to an owner operator at the rail. He's a little old school in his 60s or so. He was on paper and had to install an elog the other week. First day he used it he got over 20 violations.

He said his beeps at you for everything and I can't think of how you'd get that many for HoS alone though. I'm guessing some had to be form & manner.

Either way, that's a lot. Lol.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
#12
Which are you, the broker or the carrier? ;)

Doesn't matter how much you have it figured out. For a carrier (particularly a small carrier without their own brokerage), there is an element of chaos coming into play, doesn't matter how well you know how to operate an ELD.
Sure it does. My carrier has been marketing it's expertise in operations under ELDs far and wide. The shippers who have taken advantage of this have their capacity locked in.

Chaos is for the mooks that have been pretending that Monday wasn't going to happen.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#13
Another disconnect that will have to be worked out between brokers and carriers is timing (talking spot market freight). Many times, these brokers are putting out high rates because a load is in jeopardy of being missed. Part of the learning curve is going to be realizing that more often, carriers will be calling to book loads further in advance, and brokers who are trying to get loads moved at the last minute are either going to lose the load, or end up paying even higher last minute rates in order to find a truck for the load.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
#14
They'll just learn to have more consistent load readiness and rates will stabilize because it'll eventually not matter when you pick up because everyone everywhere will be out of hours at some point. It won't be a matter of who's willing to run rebel, it'll be what driver happens to have hours at that moment.

It'll kinda be like one ginormous carrier sending whoever can cover at the moment. Except elogs will be dictating who can go rather than a dispatcher.

It'll take some time but that's how I see it eventually fleshing out.

Even grocery will have to get their **** together and spread out their receiving instead of having the clusters they schedule now. If they don't, trucks are gonna sit there and plug all their docks until they're legal again, and they won't be able to do a thing about it.

You can bully a guy on paper but you can't make a guy go into violation when there's an electronic record flagging it down to the second with a GPS lock telling everyone exactly where the truck was.
 
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Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#15
Sure it does. My carrier has been marketing it's expertise in operations under ELDs far and wide. The shippers who have taken advantage of this have their capacity locked in.

Chaos is for the mooks that have been pretending that Monday wasn't going to happen.
Yes, and the carrier that you work for runs it's own brokerage and really isn't bound as much by the issues I am trying to open up in this thread.
 

RamblingPete

Well-Known Member
#16
Those are the loads that teams will hold out for . I can't sleep while someone else is driving, at least not fully . But for those who can ... That might be the big payday their looking for . Truck technically would never shut down , in theory .
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#17
They'll just learn to have more consistent load readiness and rates will stabilize because it'll eventually not matter when you pick up because everyone everywhere will be out of hours at some point. It won't be a matter of who's willing to run rebel, it'll be what driver happens to have hours at that moment.
In time that will happen. During that time, lots of folks may be run out of business. Not so much because they weren't prepared, but because of things in the beginning that are out of their control. Doesn't take too many missed loads to lose a contract (this goes for the small brokers, and large carriers alike).
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#18
Those are the loads that teams will hold out for . I can't sleep while someone else is driving, at least not fully . But for those who can ... That might be the big payday their looking for . Truck technically would never shut down , in theory .
Won't happen. The loads out here, for the most part, are not something a team is going to touch, and they will never pay enough to make it worthwhile for a team to waste time on. The idea, for a long time, is that trucking would just go to team driving. It only works in some scenarios, not most.
 

RamblingPete

Well-Known Member
#19
In time that will happen. During that time, lots of folks may be run out of business. Not so much because they weren't prepared, but because of things in the beginning that are out of their control. Doesn't take too many missed loads to lose a contract (this goes for the small brokers, and large carriers alike).
Large carriers have the upper hand though , by far . Basically companies with five hundred or more trucks , can realistically have trucks in every state at any time , 10 by law of averages , and if they have two or three trucks with no loads and hours then their loads are safe . Theirs always someone or someones to make the load work if you got enough trucks .
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#20
Large carriers have the upper hand though , by far . Basically companies with five hundred or more trucks , can realistically have trucks in every state at any time , 10 by law of averages , and if they have two or three trucks with no loads and hours then their loads are safe . Theirs always someone or someones to make the load work if you got enough trucks .
Large carriers aren't really affected by any of the stuff being brought up here. What I am trying to open up here is the dynamics faced by the smaller carriers (mostly one truck operations), and the brokers out here handling the spot market freight. The sector of the industry that operates in an entirely different world than the rest of the industry.
 
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