2 Cents on Most Reliable Truck?

MrHippo

New Member
Thread starter #1
Im new to trucking.

Considering looking for a 2011ish T660 13 speed cummins as first truck.

Been a mechanic by trade before turning to trying this out.

Currently at Covenant Transport learning. Plan to eventually go Landstar.

I appreciate any input.

-MrHippo
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#2
First off, welcome to the forum. Search around and you will see lots of comments regarding your question.

As for a dependable truck, everything from 04 to current (and some 03) is equipped with emissions. Dealers will try to tell you that a 04-07 is non emissions, but that is not true (they have EGR, which was full of problems). My suggestion is to avoid any emissions truck up to at least 2012, and I personally won't touch one older than 2015. I have a non emissions truck, and I will be watching how the newer trucks perform long term before making my decision on my next truck a few years down the road.

You can get the truck you are looking for, in the forum of a non emissions Glider, only it is a new truck. Fitzgerald sold T660's, not sure if they do anymore as KW is stopping production of them. That said, if they have them, you can get one with a 13 speed, and with a Cummins N-14 (rebuilt by Cummins). If your credit is good at the time you want to purchase, it is much easier to finance a Glider than it is a new truck from a dealer.

used, I would be looking at 03 or older, or an used Glider.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#4
I've heard gliders are banned in Cali, is that true?
Yes and no. If you need to run out there regularly, you cannot unless you have a DPF installed. Not worth it to me. Beyond that, you can file for a 3 day pass, I think that is just once a year.
 

gearjammer

jammer
Staff member
Supporter
#5
take my advice and just rip California out of your map book there are 47 other states that won't give you near the hassles that CA will.
 
#9
As an O/O I wouldn’t touch an emissions truck. Like @Mike said 2004-2014-ish was pretty rocky for emissions trucks. The newer ones may be better. Want proof? CAT quit building on the road motors for a reason.

As far as dependability, non-emission motors won’t derate, threaten a parked regen, plug DPFs, **** and moan about DEF, or any other bullshit. If it’s running, leave it running it’ll get you home.

I carry a scan tool. I have access to the same software the dealer does. If I’m on the road I can look up the exact same info as any mechanic.

We’ve had a couple of good discussions on preventative maintenance. In my opinion, it’s better to replace parts at home, before they fail. Instead of trying to maximize service life from a part and having it fail on the road.

Another wallet grabber are tow trucks. $750-1500 for a tow kinda hurts. Knock on wood mines not been on a hook yet.

I carry tools, spare parts and fluids. Buying fluids OTR is expensive. @mndriver argued that if your truck is well maintained you shouldn’t need spares and fluids on the truck. I see his point and agree with him
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#10
LOL, I have some nice stories about my 2015 t680 here. Never again.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
#11
For newer trucks, reliability goes to Freightliner/Westernstar trucks with the DD series engines. Comparable Pererbilt and Kenworth trucks are still having problems in fleet reliability ratings.

The emissions systems in heavy duty trucks require actual maintenance. They've become a lot more reliable, but if not taken care of can cause problems related in other posts. Unfortunately, many treat these systems like mufflers on a car... yeah, its down there - and no other thought is given. Left maintained, they can cause all sorts of performance issues, including derating. If you're going to pull freight in California, you will need a newer truck to comply with emissions laws.

If you don't have the resources for a 2012 or newer emissions truck, then look for a '03 or older truck that can be rebuilt and made road- worthy. '03 was the transition year after which trucks were equipped with EGR emission systems that started the trouble. Some worked well, others were a disaster - across both manufacturers and within the same model/engine/drivetrain types. '03s must be approached with caution because some were equipped with EGR engines as manufacturers ran out of stock on the older engines.

If you're buying a used truck, the mechanical condition is paramount. New tires, a shiny paint job mean nothing. Look for reasons not to buy the truck. The condition of the steering suspension and equipment will tell you a lot about how the truck was treated during its life. Download the trucks ECM, and review the report. Try to get an oil analysis before the oil is changed.

Good luck.
 
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BirchBarlow

I hate KW 680s
#13
Yes and no. If you need to run out there regularly, you cannot unless you have a DPF installed. Not worth it to me. Beyond that, you can file for a 3 day pass, I think that is just once a year.
I was there afew summers ago..

Them Hay Haulers seem to run 80s era Cabovers without "impunity"...

At Ontario TA seemed to be a crapload of "foreigners" in late 90s early 2000s trucks who IDLED "allday" and nobody seemed to give a crap
 
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