Rand McNally GPS

Rigjockey

Well-Known Member
Supporter
#62
Absolutely. I always scope out where I'm going on satellite view, and frequently get lat/long coordinates for the GPS. Only makes sense to do so.

But Google Inc does not specialize in providing information about truck prohibitions, low overpasses, etc, and providing a safe route for large commercial vehicles.
No of course they do not provide truck specifics but, It is useful for final approach :thumbsup:
 

Rigjockey

Well-Known Member
Supporter
#63
My warnings are never accurate. How will say steep downgrade ahead. Popup will show a right curve ahead. Those thing have never been accurate.
No. Those setting are pretty useless now. I have never got a warning for hills, or curves. Maybe it is a feature set up for the future when users report conditions. Like a beta.
 

Rodger

Well-Known Member
#64
Rand McNally has by far the best trucker friendly features on their GPS. But the reliability of the unit sucks. My last two Rand McNally's made it to 300,000 miles and they both puked.The last one was the Tnd 80 tablet. I switched to Garmin because I know the unit itself will keep on going and going.
 

ironpony

Well-Known Member
Supporter
#66
My warnings are never accurate. How will say steep downgrade ahead. Popup will show a right curve ahead. Those thing have never been accurate.
This stuff all depends on the road database... but since you're a professional driver (I use that very loosely with others) steep grade and sharp curve warnings shouldn't matter. Its the other stuff that makes a route illegal or impassable that does. Since Rand publishes the RMCA, aka "The Bible of Trucking," at least that data should match, don't you think?

If you come up PA-309 from Quakertown towards Allentown, there's a section of a US highway that's heavily travelled by trucks that my Garmin shows as a truck prohibited road. The stupid thing wants you to detour onto a local road that is marked with no truck signs. This is just an example... there are many, many more I've seen with this stupid GPS. Sitting side by side, I can clearly say that the performance of a new Garmin GPS is markedly inferior to my old Rand GPS.

Further, when programmed for the same destination, following a route that I'm certain is good on my Rand unit, frequently the Garmin wants to put me on an Interstate route that added quite a bit of unnecessary miles to the trip. When I didn't follow that routing, many times it freaked out, and wanted me to run through narrow residential streets that a semi has no business on.

The Garmin is handy for getting me into the correct lane in some of these really tricky road splits.

I'd really be throwing it in the trash except for that. Its that bad.
 

Rigjockey

Well-Known Member
Supporter
#68
Thats the magic of a Free Market...ya got choices

In a true socialist country like Russia ya got 1 choice and the Politburo and Commissars had pre-made that choice for ya too
:stare1:
Okay, I am just going to skip right over this post and not comment,
Because,
Socialism and communism are very different!:thumbsup:

Sure, In communist Russia, GPS buys you.:rolllaugh::thumbsup:
In Socialist countries you get a choice, if you have any money leftover after taxes
 

Rodger

Well-Known Member
#69
I'd call that a serious problem. Too much bad GPS for too ****ing long.
Lol!



I bought the Dezl cam which has a great dash cam. The dash cam on my Rand McNally tablet wouldn't even work. Garmin also has voice command which is really handy for entering addresses while you drive.

I guess I've been out here long enough to know most of the roads. I really don't need most of the gadgets that are on the Rand McNally. I basically use the gps for ETA's .
 

ironpony

Well-Known Member
Supporter
#70
I guess I've been out here long enough to know most of the roads. I really don't need most of the gadgets that are on the Rand McNally. I basically use the gps for ETA's .
Same here... miles to go mostly.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#71
This stuff all depends on the road database... but since you're a professional driver (I use that very loosely with others) steep grade and sharp curve warnings shouldn't matter. Its the other stuff that makes a route illegal or impassable that does. Since Rand publishes the RMCA, aka "The Bible of Trucking," at least that data should match, don't you think?

If you come up PA-309 from Quakertown towards Allentown, there's a section of a US highway that's heavily travelled by trucks that my Garmin shows as a truck prohibited road. The stupid thing wants you to detour onto a local road that is marked with no truck signs. This is just an example... there are many, many more I've seen with this stupid GPS. Sitting side by side, I can clearly say that the performance of a new Garmin GPS is markedly inferior to my old Rand GPS.
My point in an earlier post is that my RM does all the stupid stuff that your Garmin does. It will route me onto prohibited routes, away from the truck routes, and onto roads that simply make no sense at all and would take me hours longer to make a trip.

I'm not saying one company is better than the other, though, ,based on one unit.

Literally none of my settings work correctly. If I don't follow the route, it will try to get me to uturn back to the route for miles and miles, even though I have uturns turned off.

Instead of recalculating to a new route, it will continue to route me back to a route that I passed up, even to the point of taking me 2-300 miles out of the way. I've let it go for 2-3 hours, just to see if it would ever start calculating the proper way. I have to literally cancel the route and run it again, sometimes have to shut the unit off and start it back up.

Freezes constantly. Have to shut it off and start it back up. This usually happens in town, when I am actually needing it to maneuver through streets. A few fixes ago, they made it where it will reboot if this happens, not very helpful in town though, and even then, that often doesn't work.

The steep grades/curve warnings thing is just humorous as I don't depend on it for anything. audible warning will say left curve, screen popup will say right curve or steep downgrade. the two warnings never matchup. Ever.
 

ironpony

Well-Known Member
Supporter
#72
My point in an earlier post is that my RM does all the stupid stuff that your Garmin does. It will route me onto prohibited routes, away from the truck routes, and onto roads that simply make no sense at all and would take me hours longer to make a trip.

I'm not saying one company is better than the other, though, ,based on one unit.

Literally none of my settings work correctly. If I don't follow the route, it will try to get me to uturn back to the route for miles and miles, even though I have uturns turned off.

Instead of recalculating to a new route, it will continue to route me back to a route that I passed up, even to the point of taking me 2-300 miles out of the way. I've let it go for 2-3 hours, just to see if it would ever start calculating the proper way. I have to literally cancel the route and run it again, sometimes have to shut the unit off and start it back up.

Freezes constantly. Have to shut it off and start it back up. This usually happens in town, when I am actually needing it to maneuver through streets. A few fixes ago, they made it where it will reboot if this happens, not very helpful in town though, and even then, that often doesn't work.

The steep grades/curve warnings thing is just humorous as I don't depend on it for anything. audible warning will say left curve, screen popup will say right curve or steep downgrade. the two warnings never matchup. Ever.
My 510 doesn't do any of that, although if I don't constrain the routing algorithm enough, it will do as you indicate.

For example... Michigan to the east coast, all of them will put you on the toll road. I can't stand paying for that piece of **** road. So unless I need to really haul ass, its down to Perrysburg OH go catch US20 > OH18 > I76 > I80. To get either unit to route properly I have to enter Stony Ridge OH, Fremont OH, Norwalk OH and Youngstown OH to get me onto I80 after the toll road split.

I don't need the routing because I'm so familiar with the roads. It does provide reasonably accurate ETAs at a glance, and miles to go information. It also helps me accurately determine where I'll get to in a day, and whether I'll need to reserve parking. The boxes have their uses.

It would be damn nice if the vendors would fix some of this crap, because I can hear your frustration with just basic operation. With as much computational power as is in these units, you'd think they could supply us with a user interface that would allow us to push the route line to where we want it with a finger, and pin it where we want it.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#73
With as much computational power as is in these units, you'd think they could supply us with a user interface that would allow us to push the route line to where we want it with a finger, and pin it where we want it.
This would be perfect.

I basically use them for the same thing as you, ETA and mileage. It's nice to see what's up ahead as far as fuel stops and rest areas.

I connected mine to wifi for a while to get fuel price updates, but those were never accurate either, so I gave up and went back to just looking on the truck stop apps.

Google would be my best friend if they utilized truck routing. I would have my phone going and never have a GPS unit again. I love how traffic can become a problem up ahead, and google manages to find a faster route, and when you don't take google's route, it is magically able to reroute to another route rapidly.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
#74
CoPilot has drag & drop routing but it puts in weird nonsensical turns instead of being smart enough to cut them out when your finger doesn't land EXACTLY where it needs to. So you're doing a buttload of dragging and missing on a tiny screen. It's not a particularly useful feature.
 

ironpony

Well-Known Member
Supporter
#75
This would be perfect.

I basically use them for the same thing as you, ETA and mileage. It's nice to see what's up ahead as far as fuel stops and rest areas.

I connected mine to wifi for a while to get fuel price updates, but those were never accurate either, so I gave up and went back to just looking on the truck stop apps.

Google would be my best friend if they utilized truck routing. I would have my phone going and never have a GPS unit again. I love how traffic can become a problem up ahead, and google manages to find a faster route, and when you don't take google's route, it is magically able to reroute to another route rapidly.
My 510 doesn't seem to have the "rerouting stupidly" problem, so that's why I've stuck with it. Plus, being a non-cellphone platform, I don't have to worry about some flatfoot ruining my day with an unwarranted BS ticket.