Driver Cam News

Sinister

Smartass Emeritus
Supporter
#61
It was less winds than they see in Wyoming.

March 7th I rolled across elk mountain with 12K in the front third with 50-60+ mph gusts. High risk yes. He had a 35,000 load that cubed his box out and 20-25 mph winds.

So one raises an eyebrow when weather service is only reporting 20-25 mph winds.

No, ranger doesn't drive for me. But we have been talking.
Here they tell us it only takes a 38 mph wind to blow over a truck.

When would you okay a driver shutting down for wind?
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
#63
Here they tell us it only takes a 38 mph wind to blow over a truck.

When would you okay a driver shutting down for wind?
A lot of variables on that....

Going WEST on I80, I'd probably shut down a whole lot earlier than going east. One is a quartering head vs tailwind.

Going north on I35 is entirely different than going west on I80 in Iowa. As well as the opposite directions.

I have continued to drive heading east on I80 in Wyoming where I would have shut down going west. In January, I got freaked out going north on I80 just north of Des Moines but not quite to Ankeny. I pulled into the rest area and parked it till the next morning. Sustained winds over 50 MPH there. I figure if the CARS are suddenly backing away from you from a wind gust, it was time to park it. 12,000 lbs in the box is nuts. Had I been 35,000+ in the box. Entirely different picture again.

Him having only 12 months experience is different than someone with 18+ seasons of winter.

The kicker is learning for yourself WHAT your limits are. 25 mph winds reported though. Yeah, it sucks to drive in. Your arms WILL be tired by the end of a full day of it. These are the days you work for your money.

But does it justify shutting down?
 

Ranger_375

Well-Known Member
#64
It was less winds than they see in Wyoming.

March 7th I rolled across elk mountain with 12K in the front third with 50-60+ mph gusts. High risk yes. He had a 35,000 load that cubed his box out and 20-25 mph winds.

So one raises an eyebrow when weather service is only reporting 20-25 mph winds.

No, ranger doesn't drive for me. But we have been talking.
Every go/nogo decision has lots of factors to consider regarding if you can do it or not. If I had to travel 80 vs us95 with the same conditions, I would have had Octane blaring and would have been rolling. Totally doable with interstate road to work with. Wyoming has roads with more room to allow deviation due to wind.

That day was 20-25 steady depending on area, with >35mph multidirectional crosswinds as per DOT road weather monitors, on a raised roadway on sand/dirt with a paved shoulder small enough that you can't park a motorcycle safely. You will have your outer dual 3+ inches down on dirt/sand if your inner is on the white line.

You depart from the pavement, you get sucked down into a 45 degree hill to flat ground in some spots. Other spots its into a guardrail that won't stop your traverse and subsequent triple gainer off a cliff, or you eat hillside/cliff face. The terrain channels the winds in some spots, but there is nothing to give you any indicators that you are coming into anything, either on flats or in the hills. No trees, the dust has all blown away, etc.

Talked to the other 10 or so drivers that had come up with vans and similar weights at the full truck stop in town I had parked at. They started rolling prior to the warning signs being lit up... they were not happy and didn't recommend going.

Couple the winds with the immediacy of the load...or lack thereof, as the load was already >2 hours late when I was dispatched on it.... what is another 3, especially when there was no additional reward nor life safety concerns where the risk was validated. Either way, I had to take a 10 to have the total drive time necessary due to being tasked with multiple locals eating my time prior, as well as to have the time to hook and get out of socal with my next load, in an area that has minimal to no facilities for overnighting with a truck.

The zone with the wind hazard is also an area I know very well, as it's literally my current stomping grounds.
 
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mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
#65
We had that snow ban and the next night it was windy. I didn't go in for either.

I stayed in Indianapolis the night of the snow. I drove in the night of the wind.

I really didn't see what the big deal was.

A matter of perspectives though. The weather channel was making it out to be snowmagedon. For me, I was thinking, "they went all out for this crap?" It's NOTHING compared to a Midwest blizzard that won't even be mentioned on the news. We'd just had a 18-24" snow storm the week before in Minnesota. Nothing got shutdown, travel bans weren't put into place etc. Nothing like the NE the following week.

And yet here we are. Shutdown and all the hype that the weather channel can give it.

Again,....

A matter of perspectives. From the Midwest, it's normal to get 24+" snowfalls a couple times a year. I have seen years where there have been 8-10 blizzards in a season in ND/MN.

compared that to the NE and even the NW, you just chug along.

@Sinister, @Tazz are all from this area. Along with a few others. So it's not just my experience. We cut our teeth on this stuff. So running in a 2" snow that will destroy atlantians is kind of humorous yet sad at the same time.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
#66
Every go/nogo decision has lots of factors to consider regarding if you can do it or not. If I had to travel 80 vs us95 with the same conditions, I would have had Octane blaring and would have been rolling. Totally doable with interstate road to work with. Wyoming has roads with more room to allow deviation due to wind.

That day was 20-25 steady depending on area, with >35mph multidirectional crosswinds as per DOT road weather monitors, on a raised roadway on sand/dirt with a paved shoulder small enough that you can't park a motorcycle safely. You will have your outer dual 3+ inches down on dirt/sand if your inner is on the white line.

You depart from the pavement, you get sucked down into a 45 degree hill to flat ground in some spots. Other spots its into a guardrail that won't stop your traverse and subsequent triple gainer off a cliff, or you eat hillside/cliff face. The terrain channels the winds in some spots, but there is nothing to give you any indicators that you are coming into anything, either on flats or in the hills. No trees, the dust has all blown away, etc.

Talked to the other 10 or so drivers that had come up with vans and similar weights at the full truck stop in town I had parked at. They started rolling prior to the warning signs being lit up... they were not happy and didn't recommend going.

Couple the winds with the immediacy of the load...or lack thereof, as the load was already >2 hours late when I was dispatched on it.... what is another 3, especially when there was no additional reward nor life safety concerns where the risk was validated. Either way, I had to take a 10 to have the total drive time necessary due to being tasked with multiple locals eating my time prior, as well as to have the time to hook and get out of socal with my next load, in an area that has minimal tomnomfacilities for overnighting with a truck.

The zone with the wind hazard is also an area I know very well, as it's literally my current stomping grounds.
I went around Elk Mountain on US30. Not even on the interstate.

I am not saying what you did was wrong. I am not saying what I did was right.

What I am saying is that different experience levels have different perspectives on what the weather is and what are shut down conditions for one are not the same for the other.

I learned things this last go around in Wyoming that make the weather easier to deal with. For me, it was white knuckle and I admitted to a couple folks I was nuts for being out. I was scared ****less and I wanted to park it.

I learned to stretch my tandems all the way to the back and it really settled my trailer down for the cross wind. It was sustained 45 mph cross and gusting over 60 mph. one guy commented that he was from Houston and they consider Cat 1 hurricane to be 74 MPH. We were topping those speeds according to NWS and WDOT.
 

dchawk81

Well-Known Member
#67
I wasn't in the mood to run. I don't like fighting the wheel if I don't have to. It's bad enough that they still haven't put my truck in the shop for an alignment.

It's harder work for less money due to less progress. Not worth it. Sleep is better.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
#68
I loaded out on 3/3 the same day a 28" snow had just rolled through town. Rochester had called a "snow emergency". It meant you parked in your driveway not in the street. People went to work like normal.

On 3/6, I got stopped in Greeley CO on my way to Salt Lake because Elk Mountain was shut down for 80+ mph winds. On 3/7, the winds were down to 60+ and everyone was rolling.

3/13, I got stopped in Indiana for a snow in PA that was less than what we had on 3/2-3/3.

So in 18 days running, I lost 3 days work on account of weather in 3 different areas of the country. What shut down one area, didn't even count as "horrible" in another by the general population.

again. Perspective
 

ironpony

Well-Known Member
Supporter
#70
I try to use HOS breaks to my advantage to let the worst of a storm pass while I need to be stopped.

Sometimes a judicious rerouting will allow you to go around a storm.

Sometimes you get nailed, and have to shutdown. So far this winter season, I've not lost any time to weather delays. It helps that I'm usually 70,000+.